dripping hotwater tank

My gas hot water tank drips water from the overflow pipe everytime it is heating....every day I need to empty a full bucket of water. It doesn't drip when I run water(like at the sinks) but it will definitely drip(like a faucet left on a slow run) after showers/baths, when the tank must be close to empty(of hot water), It has a manuf. date of '95...is this a sign the tank is going? Thanks
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GNTRY wrote:

Actually, it's probably just a sign the overflow valve is going.
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GNTRY wrote:

No, the tank is not going. When the heater is firing, the water inside expands. That expansion can raise the pressure in the tank to the point where the relief valve opens. That's why it only drips at times.
This pressure buildup occurs when there is no place else for the (expanded) water to go. That can happen when the supply piping has a check valve or pressure reducing valve in place.
The fix is to add a "thermal expansion tank". For more info, go here: http://www.flexconind.com/html/wh-series_.html
Jim
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GNTRY wrote:

If P&T valve is sweating, lower the temp setting little bit and see. Tony
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GNTRY wrote:

The safety valve is bad, can't hold the pressure, and needs to be replaced. A bucket a day is a lot, considering that most tanks don't drip any water, ever. 95 doesn't mean anything, except that it is nearly 9 years old. Fix the drip by buying a new safety valve ($10-15) to replace the failed valve.
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You have been offered three of the four problems I can think of.
The valve could be bad.
It could be too high a temperature.
It could be a water pressure/lack of a pressure relief device problem caused by a check valve and the natural increase pressure of heating the water. A functional pressure relief device may help.
It also could be too high water pressure coming into your home. To check for this (and above) you can get your own pressure gauge check it out. If this is the problem, you need a pressure reduction device on the incoming line.
So what to do? My suggestion is to start cheap and work up. Try reducing the water temperature for a while. If that does not work, and I would not bet on it, try the new valve, they are cheap and easy to replace. Next the gauge if that does not work.
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Joseph E. Meehan

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No, it's a sign that when the cold water in your tank expands, it doesn't have any where to go. Water expands as it's heated.
Does your water system have an expansion tank some where? Which needs to be drained now adn again?
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Christopher A. Young
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line. When the water heater runs the water expands and can't go back into the company system so it goes out the valve. I'd consider an expansion tank. I had the same problem (not to that extent) and with the tank my bucket stays dry. You could also have a bad pressure relief valve, I believe Lowes sells a gauge you can put on a hydrant connection that'll show current and highest pressure. I'd start with that and bring the readings back here for further help.
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GNTRY wrote:

You have been offered a lot of info on water pressure increases, check valves, etc. The facts are simple, check valves can be a problem, but seldom are. Most houses don't have expansion tanks. If you have water hammer reducers, they can serve as expansion tanks. Bottom link, go check a store that sells the relief valves and look at the pressures. It would be highly unusual for the pressure in you house system to exceed that pressure. The problem is a failed valve, a common problem. Replace the valve, and don't look for highly unusual or strange problems. If replacement doesn't solve your problem, then look for exotic fixes, which will probably include a complete examination of your system for damage due to very high pressures.
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