Drip edge discouraged


Hi,
I am getting reroofing bids for my 25 year old house, and I have gotten conflicting advice regarding installation of drip edge.
The first roofer told me he does not recommend installing it because it is not necessary when the shingles are installed properly, and can cause the shingles not to lay straight if the underlying roof structure has irregularities.
The second roofer said that was nonsense, and they always install drip edge.
Both of these roofers have highest ratings in a local consumer ratings service (Washington Checkbook).
Any advice would be appreciated.
Thanks.
GB
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GB wrote:

Both ways work when done properly. I would suggest that if a specific contractor has had good experience with one and poor experience with the other, only a fool would tell them to use the method they have had problems with in the past.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia \'s Muire duit
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NRCA ( National Roofing Contractors Association ) Manual say perimeter flashing / drip edge "should be considered" depending on climate, amount of snow and rain. It Then says NRCA " recommends " its use to allow water to drip off roof without affecting underlying construction. T
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On Mar 1, 7:27?am, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

JERK ROOFER failed to install drip edge here, pittsburgh snow and ice.: (
Well extended bad weather had water and ice get between gutter and home, 2 foot wide 1 foot deep ice flow down side of 2 story home, ice flowed in window area. I was out chipping and melting ice flow daily.
had another roofer by oh no drip edge:(
That summer he added drip edge and no futher troubles! over 10 yeears ago,
I wouldnt consider a roofer who didnt want to install a drip edge, wonder what other corners he is cutting.
drip edge is cheap too.
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Drip edge into a gutter? Here in WI we would always use gutter apron or site built flashing into gutters, and drip edge on all the rakes. Both are very easy to install, and very cheap. I can't imagine doing a roof without them.
JK
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Same here. Worst case for installing them is 'they do not add anything'. They for sure aren't going to 'hurt' anything and the cost of material and time installing is miniscule. I would move on rapidly past any roofer claiming they would cause the shingles to lay badly.
Harry K
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they're not? MLD
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"GB" wrote

Drip edge "is" neccessary, depending on a lot of circumstances. For instance, if your structure has a aluminum or such covering, the drip covers the top edge of it. If drip edge isn't installed, you will get blown, or dripping infiltration which will eventually cause substantial damage.
There are different types of drip edge. Do _not_ let anyone install a "c" channel drip edge, under any circumstances. I could write pages on why not to have this type of drip edge. Even in my area, city localities will not let this type of drip edge installed.
As far as the first roofer telling you his version. I say BS, and this is coming from someone that had close to 30 years in the business.
Drip edge isn't really isn't "cheap", as some others have said. It's priced about 28 cents a lineal foot, at suppliers in my area. If you have a hip style home, it adds up fast. But, having an after-thought about getting it installed after a new roof is installed, is too late.
As a side note: Shingles are supposed to over hang the drip edge, never even with it.
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| | "GB" wrote | > Hi, | > | > I am getting reroofing bids for my 25 year old house, and I have gotten | > conflicting advice regarding installation of drip edge. | > | > The first roofer told me he does not recommend installing it because it | > is not necessary when the shingles are installed properly, and can cause | > the shingles not to lay straight if the underlying roof structure has | > irregularities. | > | > The second roofer said that was nonsense, and they always install drip | > edge. | > | > Both of these roofers have highest ratings in a local consumer ratings | > service (Washington Checkbook). | > | > Any advice would be appreciated. | > | > Thanks. | | Drip edge "is" neccessary, depending on a lot of circumstances. For | instance, if your structure has a aluminum or such covering, the drip | covers the top edge of it.
why not just bend the aluminum so it is tucked under the shingles?
If drip edge isn't installed, you will get | blown, or dripping infiltration which will eventually cause substantial | damage.
that's BS my wood shingled roof has no drip edge haven't seen any substantial damage yet (20 yrs.later). it's the gutters that seem to always cause the damage from what I have replaced for customers.
| | There are different types of drip edge. Do _not_ let anyone install a "c" | channel drip edge, under any circumstances. I could write pages on why not | to have this type of drip edge. Even in my area, city localities will not | let this type of drip edge installed.
sometimes for the right application "C" channel is needed, it all depends on the trim. for instance, on a bitumen roof application it hides the nailing strip around the perimeter.
| | As far as the first roofer telling you his version. I say BS, and this is | coming from someone that had close to 30 years in the business. | | Drip edge isn't really isn't "cheap", as some others have said. It's priced | about 28 cents a lineal foot, at suppliers in my area. If you have a hip | style home, it adds up fast. But, having an after-thought about getting it | installed after a new roof is installed, is too late. | | As a side note: Shingles are supposed to over hang the drip edge, never | even with it. | |
I am a firm believer in drip edge for the bottom so it overlaps the fascia board but not on the rake boards unless it is a re-roof (it hides the edges of the original roof nicely).
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You can, if you have a brake. It's called a drip edge.

If you're going to reply to something, don't take it out of context. It's not BS to what I said. WTF, you have a reading comprehension problem also?
I said: "Drip edge "is" neccessary, depending on a lot of circumstances. For instance, if your structure has a aluminum or such covering, the drip covers the top edge of it. If drip edge isn't installed, you will get blown, or dripping infiltration which will eventually cause substantial damage."

Ut oh, I think I smell a butcher.
> I am a firm believer in drip edge for the bottom so it overlaps the

It is, it's a butcher. Someone to lazy to trim edges. I've seen hundreds of your kind in my days. The faces change, the name remains the same, butcher.
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wrote | > why not just bend the aluminum so it is tucked under the shingles? | | You can, if you have a brake. It's called a drip edge.
I meant bend the aluminum rake trim to fit under the shingles. it is called "rake trim"
| | > If drip edge isn't installed, you will get | > | blown, or dripping infiltration which will eventually cause | > substantial | > | damage. | > | > that's BS | > my wood shingled roof has no drip edge | > haven't seen any substantial damage yet (20 yrs.later). | > it's the gutters that seem to always cause the damage from what I have | > replaced for customers. | | If you're going to reply to something, don't take it out of context. It's | not BS to what I said. WTF, you have a reading comprehension problem also? | | I said: "Drip edge "is" neccessary, depending on a lot of circumstances. | For | instance, if your structure has a aluminum or such covering, the drip | covers the top edge of it. If drip edge isn't installed, you will get | blown, or dripping infiltration which will eventually cause substantial | damage." | | | | > | > | > | > | > | > | | > | There are different types of drip edge. Do _not_ let anyone install a | > "c" | > | channel drip edge, under any circumstances. I could write pages on why | > not | > | to have this type of drip edge. Even in my area, city localities will | > not | > | let this type of drip edge installed. | > | > | > sometimes for the right application "C" channel is needed, it all | > depends on the trim. | > for instance, on a bitumen roof application it hides the nailing strip | > around the perimeter. | | Ut oh, I think I smell a butcher. | | > I am a firm believer in drip edge for the bottom so it overlaps the | > fascia board | > but not on the rake boards unless it is a re-roof (it hides the edges of | > the original roof nicely). | | It is, it's a butcher. Someone to lazy to trim edges. I've seen hundreds of | your kind in my days. The faces change, the name remains the same, butcher. | |
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Now just why would you go to all that trouble when standard drip edge does the same thing? Clue, drip edge is used on the rake also. The drip edge and installation would be cheaper than the time spend dicking around bending your 'rake trim'. I have to agree with MOe yo don't know WTF you are talking about.
Harry K
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wrote | > | > why not just bend the aluminum so it is tucked under the shingles? | > | | > | You can, if you have a brake. It's called a drip edge. | > | > I meant bend the aluminum rake trim to fit under the shingles. | > it is called "rake trim" | > | | Now just why would you go to all that trouble when standard drip edge | does the same thing?
wind gets under drip edge it can not get behind a bent rake trim. that IS the difference a high wind can rip off the drip edge on a rake causing substanial damage. you obviosly have little or no experience in repairs. wind is more of a problem than rain rain falls down wind................well.................goes every direction.
so if your drip edge is over lapping the rake trim and wind gets in there it will rip off the drip edge, aluminum rake trim and some roof shingles.
my way you may get a shingle or 2 ripped off from the wind. repair is much faster and less expensive for the home owner.
I understand that those of you who install drip edge on rakes are looking for job security.................for me...................I'm already secure.
Clue, drip edge is used on the rake also. The | drip edge and installation would be cheaper than the time spend | dicking around bending your 'rake trim'.
it is the repairs that get costly for the homeowner.
I have to agree with MOE | yo don't know WTF you are talking about. | | Larry Fine
no wonder why you agree Larry..........where's Curley. that's the way stooges always do it. | |
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Strange. I just did a google on 'roofing rake edge'. Guess what. Not one entry on the first page (I didn't go beyond that) mentioned a thing called a 'rake edge' to be applied to the 'rake edge'. Every place that 'rake edge' was mentioned it referred to that part of a roof and specifically said to apply "drip edge'.
I have roofed in Texas in the heat (repairs), Wa. Built my own house, reroofed my house and my mothers house, helped my brother reroof his house and put a roof on his new machine shed... Drip edge applied to the rake as follows - tarpaper, drip edge, shingle. Just as the shingle bundle always says. i;.e., 'apply DRIP EDGE to the rake' (I don't have a bundle laying around or I would quote the exact phrase).
What are your qualifications?
Perhaps you can tell all of use experience types who don't know what we have been doing just what the hell that magical 'rake edge' is your are talking about.
Drip edge is a 'bent piece' of trim, It is bent at 90 with a very short back bend on the long leg. It comes with both short and long sides so you have a choice. In all the roof damage I have both worked on and seen, never once did I see where the 'drip edge' was damaged by the wind unless the entire roof was destroyed.
Work on your reading comprehension. My name is not "Larry".
Harry K
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I forgot to ask you to give a description of just what that mysterious 'rake edge' is that you are talking about.
Harry K
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have rentals, use the drip edge. it helps the edge of the roof wood covered to keep it from rotting.been there.lucas
http://www.minibite.com/america/malone.htm
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