Drilling Through Faux Marble?

Cannot be more specific because I have no clue...
But our shower is built from sheets of plastic-ish stuff that is obviously supposed to look like marble - about 1/2" thick.
Seems pretty hard at first look, but I took a pair of el-cheapo scissors and was able to scratch the stuff.
What are the chances I will be able to drill holes in it to install a grab handle - without buying a special drill ?
Techniques for getting the drill started without having it walk all over the place?
--
Pete Cresswell

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(PeteCresswell) wrote:

In all probability, it is polyester resin. Easy to drill/cut. Just drill a small, shallow starter hole. Or even use a knife to dig out a small & shallow cone.
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On 03/31/2016 10:56 AM, dadiOH wrote:

My guess as well. Treat it as if were wood, basically. Use a sharp center punch or ice pick/awl to make the starter hole and start first hole with small diameter bit
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There is enough aggregate in that matrix to dull a regular drill pretty fast but if you are ready to chuck it when you are done, it might last long enough for a couple holes.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I haven't seen miles of "faux marble" but none I have ever seen has any aggregate. Color (swirled into the resin), yes; aggregate, no.
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wrote:

I know "Cultured marble" will destroy a regular carbide saw blade. I never drilled it. You may be thinking of something else I guess.
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On 03/31/2016 01:10 PM, dadiOH wrote:

'Faux marble' usually refers to a finish on a wooden surface to resemble marble. The molded man made marble used for bathroom sinks and so forth is essentially fine sand in a polyester matrix.
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On Thursday, March 31, 2016 at 11:58:56 AM UTC-4, dpb wrote:

...but don't rap the center punch with a hammer, just use it scratch the surface enough to remove any glaze. That will help prevent the drill bit from walking.
I would also consider drilling very slowly and maybe even using a little bit of lubricant. Depends on how hard the material actually is.
Do you know where the studs are?
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You won't need a special drill, but you will need a masonry bit. They aren't particularly expensive.

Put some masking tape where you want to drill, don't use excessive force, keep the area wet with a squeeze bottle. There's plenty of Youtibe videos.
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On 3/31/2016 8:40 AM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

Dip the end of a soda straw into epoxy, liberally. Stick that end onto the surface where you'd like the hole. When epoxy has cured, cut straw off. This leaves a ring of epoxy adhering to the surface. Center drill bit in this ring. Proceed slowly.
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Per (PeteCresswell):

Dremel tool with the little burr-like bit: http://tinyurl.com/j8zfrsa
Coincidentally the right hole size too.... Went through the faux whatever-it-was like a hot knife through butter. I stopped when it hit the wood, and then followed up with a regular wood drill.
--
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