Drilling out a bolt

I'm trying to drill out some very old (but recently broken) Tapcon bolts from a brick wall. They are 3/16" diameter bolts, and I tried using a 3/16" Titanium bit, but it didn't get me anywhere. I also tried drilling a smaller 5/64" starter hole, also with a Titanium bit, but that didn't work either. I am using a Black and Decker 3/8" corded drill.
Do I need a more powerful drill, or should I be using a different kind of bit? Any suggestions are appreciated.
BTW, these bolts are about 20' up the wall. They held the letters of an old sign, and the bolts broke when the letters were being removed for repair. We'd like to put the letters back up in the same place they were before, using 1/4" Tapcon bolts.
Thanks!
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My suggestion is to move over a inch or two and drill another hole. Tapcons are really hard and if they are broken off below the surface moving over is the only practical idea I have.
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You might try a drill bit made of "carbide" or carbide tipped. jeff
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drilling
of
were
Yup...
A carbide "screw machine drill"......(this a "stubby" drill bit ).....also, suggest use of an air powered drill motor to get your surface speed up, as electric drills generally will run at too slow of an rpm for effective use with the smaller diameter drill bits.
--
SVL






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Greetings,
I have had this same problem. In my case I drilled out a 1/2" hole immediately BESIDE the tapcon to get it out. I filled the hole with mortar which I was able to drill into to place another tapcon into the exact same position. Depending on why the tapcon is there a filled 1/2" hole might not even be noticeable (remember, you can put the hole on any side of the tapcon). If it is noticeable you could mix the mortar with red latex paint colour matched to your brick instead of water.
Hope this helps, William
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I should add that I already tried to use a screw extractor, but I wasn't able to drill into the broken bolt far enough to hammer the extractor in.
Brian Anderson wrote:

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The bolt and the bit are both harder than the brick. probably end up with a ragged hole even a 5/16th bolt wouldn't fit in. You're better off moving over 1 inch and starting with new holes. It will take less time, cause less frustration and is more likely to succeed.
If the bolts are sticking out a bit, try a vice grip and unscrew but it dosen't sound like you have that option.
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Brian Anderson writes:

Drilling isn't gonna work.
What the world needs is a hollow carbide-tipped drill that fits over Tapcons. Then you could just drill over the busted Tapcon, reaming out a little ring of the surrounding masonry, and then replace with epoxy anchors or fresh masonry fill. Kind of an anti-Tapcon drill.
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In alt.home.repair on Fri, 22 Jul 2005 21:08:42 -0500 Richard J Kinch

Send me your plans and 500 dolllars and I will get this patented for you. If you act now, you will also receive two free books, Inventions that Changed the World, and How I made 2 Million Dollars in Real Estate with Only a Thousand Dollars Down.
Meirman -- If emailing, please let me know whether or not you are posting the same letter. Change domain to erols.com, if necessary.
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I think I'll go with the consensus suggestion and simply drill new holes. Thanks!
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Brian Anderson wrote:

you could search the archives of rec.crafts.metalworking
this is a recurring problem in their sandbox
My own experience is that KROIL brand fluid has incredible power to self-wick into the threads of stuck bolts. Give it time to wick in there.
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