Drilling hole without splitting underside?

Is there any way to drill a hole thru a finished cabinet, as in installing handles, and not have the wood finish at the other end of the hole (the exit point) become splintered or otherwise split when the bit comes thru? FWIW, I'm using a variable speed drill.
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Paul R
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Paul R wrote:

Clamp a piece of scrap to the back, and do clamp it; don't try to hold it.
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use a brad tip bit. when the brad tip breaks through, stop, and drill from the other side.
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Paul R wrote:

Use a brad point or forstner bit and when the pilot breaks through, finish drilling from the other side. The best method was already mentioned. Clamp a piece of backing material to the piece you are drilling.
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masking tape on the back should be plenty... no clamp needed.
randy
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How well is masking tape going to hold when you're on the other side leaning into the drill going through particle board?
Not much.
The "drill almost all the way through, and finish from the other side" works with augers, spade bits and some large diameter brad points.
But for a teensy hole for a handle screw? You'd be lucky if you pulled it off one time out of four.
1/8" forstner? You must be joking ;-)
With care, you can do this with _sharp_ brad points when the material is simply held down flat (the firmer the better) sacrificial horizontal surface. Like a piece of scrap plywood on a workbench. But don't push too hard on the drill.
If you have to do this "in the air", clamp on scraps. Really.
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For twist drill bits, what about drilling a smaller hole all the way through from one side, and then enlarging from each side?
Cheers, Wayne
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try it before you judge it. and if you are leaning on the drill to get through particle board, you dont know how to use a drill.
randy
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I have. Lots.

"Leaning" was an exaggeration. You can't drill thru PTB without at least _some_ pressure. With fragile veneers or melamine, it's too much, even with a very sharp brad point without _firm_ backing.
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wrote:

Clamp a scrap piece of wood on the exit side. There are other methods, but I found this one works every time.
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Phisherman wrote:


Agreed. Usually don't even need to clamp it if you can get both hands involved in the action, the weight of drilling will keep the good and the scrap pressed up against your other hand.
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Phisherman wrote:

I had thought of this one, for it makes sense intuitively. However, I didn't have a way of clamping the wood at the time I had to drill the holes, so I didn't. Thanks for the info!
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Paul, i read the replies to this post and while they are good ideas they are indeed overkill....i install kitchen/bath cabinets for a living, so drilling for hardware is an everyday occurance...i never use a backer, or a bradpoint bit, i never have to drill from both sides, and i don't have the backside "blow out" in either real wood or laminated particleboard...secret? sharp bit and let the tool do the work...don't force it, don't "lean" on it, just hold light steady pressure and the bit will do its job quickly and neatly...
Chris Perdue
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Chris Perdue wrote:

Thanks! I had brand new bits so it must have been my adding extra pressure to the drill. I was able to repair the splintered areas with wood filler that came with the cabinets. Can't tell it happened, actually. Next time I'll let the drill do its work.
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Clamp a piece of scrap wood over the area where the bit will emerge.
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Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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The head of the screw that holds the handle from the back will cover the small amount of tearout. Ease up as it goes thru.
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Clamp a piece of scrap in place on the backside. No tearout.
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sharp bits used properly....no tearout ------------------- Chris Perdue "I'm ever so thankful for the Internet; it has allowed me to keep a finger in the pie and to make some small contribution to those younger who will carry the air-cooled legend forward" Jim Mais Feb. 2004
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Paul R wrote:

The most common way is to clamp a scrap on the back. You can also take a very small bit all of the way through, then use the full size bit from both sides going half way each side.
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