Drilling hole in Quartz Countertop


What is the best drill bit to use to drill a 1/2" hole in a quartz countertop? It might need to drill throug the sink (iron) as well.
thanks.
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I'd be guessing if I said carbide masonry bit. I'd contact the countertop guys first. Drilling the cast iron sink is another challenge to keep the porcelain from breaking away in big chips. I'd be looking for other ways to achieve whatever you are trying to do.
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Diamond edge hole saw. Maybe even carbide tipped. Milwaukee has latter, Harbor Freight the former.
Joe
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On Sun, 21 Feb 2010 10:48:15 -0600, "mook johnson"

Best way is to get someone who has done it successfully several times to do it for you.
Sounds like a disaster waiting to happen to me.
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Jeff The Drunk wrote:

Just try it on samples of both materials first.
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They make drills just for glass, where the rake and angles minimize chipping. You'd proly be best off just switching to regular HSS drill for the sink, which may or may not have trouble with any porcelain coatings, but it should get through. Do *not* use oil when drilling cast iron.
Quartz ountertop??? Sound nice, exotic. What color? Where do you get these?
--
EA


>
> thanks.
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Its what the builder called Zero Maintenance granite. Its made by a company named Avanza. A similar product is Silstone. Its an engineered stone with a quartz base. Has the look of granite with excellent stain resistance with no need to seal.
I'm trying to add a filtered water spigot but have put it off for years because I didn't want to mess with drilling this stuff. The boss is REALLY ready for one now because she HATES the PUR filters on the water faucet.
Time to dive in. :)
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mook johnson wrote:

Hi, When I was installing same on our granite counter top, I had a guy come in and drill the hole for me. Same cost about same as buying a drill bit which I may use only once in a long time.
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On 2/21/2010 3:53 PM, mook johnson wrote:

Engineered stone, to me, means that it is stone in plastic and probably similar to Corian where you can google up stuff like this with specific directions:
http://www.naturalhandyman.com/iip/infxtra/infdrillingcorian.html
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replying to Frank, RYAN wrote: Quartz is definitely not Corian... Corian is acrylic and Avanza is ground up basically ground up granite and glued back together. Great in kitchens as there is no maintenance like with granite... but it is much more durable than Corian.
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Easy solution. Install a whole house type filter under the sink for the cold water line. All the cold water will be filtered and taste good with no additional holes needed. I change the cartridge every three months or so. If you have access from the basement, install the filter there as it is easier to work there. Problems solved.
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Second the suggestion, why take a chance on making a good-looking installation look like junk. An under-sink cold-water filter will be much easier and less risky.
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I have never had this problem myself but when ever you see it done on TOH and similar programs, they seem to use the diamond hole saw. Consider some way to keep the saw exposed to coolant
Joe G.
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GROVER wrote:

On TOH, they use a dam made from from clay, or cardboard and tape, and the gofer stands there and squirts water(?) from a lab bottle on the bit as it turns. If it is a big cut, a second gofer uses a suction line on the other side.
-- aem sends..
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