Drilling Brick?

My girlfriend wants me to add an outside faucet in her back yard that will require a 1" hole through the brick foundation. There is an adequate crawl space for me to work and it looks like I'm about to get an education in working with PEX. But before I tackle that, I need to punch through the brick. To that end, I bought a 1" Bosch masonry drill bit that I intend to use with a 18 volt Milwaukee hammer drill.
I've read conflicting statements concerning *where* to drill: should I try for between the bricks in the mortar line or just center a single brick? It seems that I would potentially damage as many as four bricks if things don't go well drilling in the mortar joints. Brick and masonry obviously isn't one of my skill sets.
Your thoughts?
--
Mortimer Schnerd, RN
mschnerdatcarolina.rr.com
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Mortimer Schnerd, RN wrote:

concrete block? Or is this just brick skirting on a house that is really sitting on piers? If it is multi-layer or over block, it doesn't matter much, since the joints won't line up anyway. If it is a single layer of brick, avoid the mortar joints, and take care to drill at 90 degrees to the face. If you can go higher, and drill through the space between the joists up in the floor, that would be better, and reduce the chances of the pipe freezing,
-- aem sends...
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Even among real brick, there can be considerable variation.. I've seen bricks that yield relatively easily and others that are hard as hell. Personally, I wouldn't attempt to drill a 1" hole in brick with a cordless drill, unless I had no other choice for some reason. I'd use an AC one that has more balls and is really suited to the application and likely to survive. And I would go for the mortar joint if possible. But either way, drilling one hole is not that big of a deal. It's when you have to drill 50 of them that it's a real bitch.
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On Jul 12, 7:28�am, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

start with a quartyer inch hole and work up.
I bought a corded hammer drill at harbor freight, best bucks i ever spent
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"Mortimer Schnerd, RN" <mschnerdatcarolina.rr.com> wrote:

Don't use a masonry bit with a hammer drill. You need a hammer drill bit. For a masonry bit use a regular drill. No big deal though, it will just destroy the bit. If you'll only use it once, then so what.
CL
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On Sat, 12 Jul 2008 05:29:04 -0400, Mortimer Schnerd, RN wrote:

This doesn't help your drilling problem, but put the spigot as high as you are able so you can conveniently put a bucket beneath it. My house has spigots with less than 10" clearance. It is impossible to put any container under them.
I'm doing a rehab and my intent is to put the spigot about 24-36" off the ground. No more stooping!
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Franz Fripplfrappl
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"Mortimer Schnerd, RN" <mschnerdatcarolina.rr.com> wrote in message

A 1" bit for a cordless drill may exceed the drill's capacity. Start off with a smaller bit such as 1/4" and go up in increments.
Are you drilling through above ground fascia bricks or below ground foundation block? Fascia bricks may have wood behind them. Try drill a small test hole to see how it goes.
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On Jul 12, 4:29am, "Mortimer Schnerd, RN" <mschnerdatcarolina.rr.com> wrote:

A Star chisel works well and will save the drill.
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