drill or screw driver

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On Fri, 19 Jul 2013 19:34:13 -0700 (PDT), leza wang

BTW, I bought at a yard sale a battery operated drill and small saw. I didn't pay much but it still wasn't worth it because everyone has switched to a higher voltage with more power, even for home-use quality tools. Including, I'm sure, the guy I bought these tools from. I can't remember what I have or what the new voltage is.
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wrote:

For driving screws, a 9.6 or 12 volt is really all you need most of the time. But men being men, we often go to the higher voltages because we can. I prefer something lighter that gets the job done.
That said, my car has a turbocharger and a top speed I'll probably never see even though I've already hit 123 mph.
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Isn't there a saying, "The guy who has most toys wins at the end"
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wrote:

I don't expect to win, but I'm in the top half for sure.
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How do we count?
Do they have to be functioning on their own, or can I count every spare part I have?
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Another problem is that the batteries that came with my tools were almost dead. Of course, that is when people sell things that use batteries. They would work for 5 minutes. But I didn't want to spend money for new ones.

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On Friday, July 19, 2013 9:34:13 PM UTC-5, leza wang wrote:

not cordless and i am thinking to use it as a screw driver to screw a big board for my front house, or do I need special device? Thanks https://www.y outube.com/watch?v=fkOVc9FtozA
Leza,
We need to know if your drill has one speed, two speeds, or is a variable s peed control type of drill.
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wrote:

Thank you.

I recently bought a cordless impact driver for the task of driving screws instead of using my cordless drill/driver for both driving screws and drilling holes.
There was a big increase in performance over the drill for the task of driving screws. Not only that, the impact driver was smaller so it was able to get into tighter spots AND it weighed less.
Try one out. You'll like it too I'm sure.
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Interesting. I first thought of impact wrench, and was confused so Google to the rescue. Looks like it supplies an impact force at the same time it delivers turning force so you're less likely to strip the screw and it will push the screw in a bit the same time it's turning it.
A tool to keep in mind.
--
Dan Espen

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wrote:

Exactly. Other tools tend to come off the head, or the screwdriver blade comes out of the slot, damaging it. These things are pushed the hardest into the slot at the same time they are twisting. By the time the pressure pushing it in has ended, so has the twisting.

I'm not a tool expert, but I havent noticed t hese for sale at Ace Hardware or HD or HF.. 4 years ago, JCWhitney sold two different models, one about the size of a toilet paper rollm akk netak, and another bigger one with a rubberized handle and something to keep the hammer from hitting your hand.
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On Sunday, July 21, 2013 10:16:59 PM UTC-4, micky wrote:

Phillips screws are designed so the screwdriver will cam out and slip, to ensure you can't put too much force on them.
Does the impact driver avoid that? Not sure if that's good or bad.
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Impact drivers don't have clutches... at least I don't know of any that do.
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Why not? So as to not ruin the head?

What I call an impact driver will probably not come out of a phillips head screw. But I don't think it will ruin the head either.
What the vendors have recently started calling an impact driver seems to me the wrong tool for the job an impact hammer does well, unless it has the ability to make only one impact when you pull the trigger.

I see that google adds to the confusion here. Googling for "impact driver" comes up with a bunch of power tools, like the one in the video. It even shows pictures. I've always called these things impact wrenches or hammer drills. We've been talking about an impact driver, which by convention refers to a hand tool It gets hit with a real hammer, like a ball peen hammer. And it's much cheaper and takes much less space than electric.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Impact_driver The first picture. Not the second picture.
'In some situations however, this type [the electric "impact driver"] falls short since current designs cannot deliver the downward blow of a manual unit. This can be especially true on very stubborn fasteners. It is a common misconception that motorized impact drivers deliver a downward force when in fact they deliver no downward force at all. The drill which exerts a downward force is a hammer drill.'
I've never turned on my hammer drill, but i"m sure it keeps running as long as the trigger is pulled.
"These are not to be confused with the impact wrench, which is a motorized tool (usually powered by compressed air) with a similar name and function. These also use a rotary hammering action to apply torque to fasteners. The difference is that impact wrenches do not provide the positive engagement that impact drivers offer as mentioned above. Otherwise impact drivers and impact wrenches operate in essentially the same fashion."
What does this mean, "not provide positive engagement" Doesn't sound like "downward force" to me.
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On Tuesday, July 23, 2013 5:11:56 AM UTC-4, micky wrote:

No, to avoid torquing the screw too much. Here's a snip from wiki: ********** To cam out (or cam-out) is a process by which a screwdriver slips out of th e head of a screw being driven once the torque required to turn the screw e xceeds a certain amount.[1]
Frequently, camming out damages the screw, and possibly also the screwdrive r, and should normally be avoided. The Phillips head screw and screwdriver combination was designed specifically to cam out, as at the time of its inv ention torque-sensing automatic screwdrivers did not exist.[citation needed ] The Phillips design is auto-centering, that is, the screw does not slip o ff the screwdriver, unlike a normal slotted-head (flat-head) screws, but ca ms out once the screw has been driven home. These properties were used to s peed up automobile production in the USA in the early years of the industry .
In recent years, automated manufacturing insertion tools can now precisely sense fastener torque. Consequently, it is typical for computer parts, auto mobiles, and other highly-engineered products, to be assembled with Torx or Pozidriv head screws,[2] which have been specifically designed not to cam out. **************
I have the hand tool you hit with a hammer. It has downforce (obviously) a t the same time as twisting force. I've never used the impact tool being d escribed, which apparently just twists the screw in intermittently?
Most of the DIY jobs I've done have been fine with a nonpowered screwdriver , though a bit slower.
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wrote:

In college at a post office auction, I bought a broken SLR camera. I twisted the heads off of three screws before i realized every second screw in the gear train was CCW. Ruined that, but haven't made the same mistake since, iirc.
FWIW I've had the impact driver 20 years before I needed it, and I've only used it to remove screws, never to tighten them.

I think so.

Me too.
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