Drill Bits

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Roger Shoaf wrote:

Excellent information, Roger. Regarding masonry bits, some packages say they are usable in hammer drills, some are not. Is there a way to look at a bit and tell whether it is rated for use in a hammer drill? While cleaning up my shop yesterday, I found a brand new, in-the-box, hammer drill that I received as a Christmas present a few years ago. Go figure.
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I know you got a new drill, but in the future, if you need to do any serious drilling (lots of holes, or holes larger than 3/8") consider a roto hammer with SDS bits. They lock in, and a roto hammer compared to a hammer drill is like comparing a hand drill to an electric drill. Lots of good used ones available, too. I got a nice Makita at a yard sale for $20, and have used it to drill holes up to 1". It also has a chisel setting, and I have bought a set of points for breaking concrete and stones and such. Be sure to get the SDS, as some brand names (Hilti comes to mind) have proprietary drill bits that can run $100! SDS bits at the Borg are very reasonable, and if you can find them at yard sales, DIRT CHEAP.
Just a FYI thing.
Steve
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On 12/24/2009 12:51 PM Steve B spake thus:

I was going to say before you replied that there are hammer drills and there are rotary hammers, which aren't the same thing.
But what's the difference? I know I've used rotary hammers w/SDS bits, and that they make short work of drilling holes in concrete. But I really don't know the difference between the two types of tools.
One thing's for sure, for the OP: those carbide masonry bits you get at the big orange store or equivalent are *not* made to be used in anything but a regular old drill. That much I know.
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From personal experience, I've found that Harbor Freight titanium coated bits are worth about what you pay for them. Not sure why, but they do not cut well at all.
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wrote:

Harbor Freight bits are good for wood. Very soft wood. And use light pressure.
Steve
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mcp6453 wrote:

Wrong __________
Yes if you are drilling masonry, glass, tile, etc. ___________

Cobalt = hard = for steel especially thick steel. Ditto titanium but those are coated, not solid. Black oxide is just a finish, helps prevent rust (red oxide), nothing more. ______________

For wood, brad point bits are nice, no good for anything else except maybe plastic. If you don't want brad points, just get HSS. ________________

Any place ____________

Not much point in it unless you are buying a bunch and can get them cheaper including shipping.
IMO, bits are disposable items...when they no longer cut well, toss and buy another.
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dadiOH
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My local CostCo has a set of 99 Toshiba (or Hitachi) branded drill bits. Multiple copies of various and sundry sizes for $20. It's the gold colored metal, whatever that is.
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HS steel is my choice. If you can find them made in the US or Canada, all the better. You can use HS steel bits for either wood or metal. My masonary bits are carbide tipped, but hat is not what you want for wood or metal. Not sure if Craftsman bits are China-made junk or not? I prefer to replace the bits, but you can certainly sharpen your old bits if you spend the time.
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High speed are used for soft stuff like plastic. They last a while on metal.
Colbalt and black oxide and titanium are supposed to last longer than high speed.
Carbide are for masonry, ceramic, glass, etc.
I'm not sure an indsutrial is any better. My problem is that most drill assortments take up a couple dozen cubic inches of air space around a dozen or so drill bits. They used to sell drill bits in a flat case that I really liked.
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HSS are good enough for most home uses.
A Black Oxide drill is just a coating that makes the original drill lasts a little longer than HSS, but the drill loses its benefit once the coating is gone.
Cobalt last much longer
Titanium coated drills are for very hard steels but once the coating wears you lose the benefits.
Carbide drills made for metal are for extremely hard materials but chip with interrupted cuts. Hard to sharpen. Must use a diamond wheel for sharpening.
**************** HSS and Cobalt can be sharpened easily without losing any quality. This can be done by hand with a little practice. You can buy a drill gauge to lay the drill against and check your work.
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