Dremel/mototool "bits"

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On Tue, 16 Feb 2016 18:30:49 -0500, "Ralph Mowery"

I dont plan to buy one from HF, but I'd like to see a picture of it. What is it listed under on the HF website? (Or the page URL)?
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for just under $ 30. Or you could use the weekly 20% off.
Item #61613
http://www.harborfreight.com/catalogsearch/result?q=chain+saw+sharpner
Lowes has one that looks similar for about $ 43.
Home Depot seems to have 2 brands that are similar.
I bet they are all made in or near the same place in China.
You can go to You Tube and look around for them to see them use.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n89jWZ7x0ZM

I put mine on a piece of 2x4 about a foot long and clamp it in my vise when I want to use it.
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On 2/16/2016 5:25 PM, Ralph Mowery wrote:

Yikes! It's BIG! Would almost require as much space as the *saw* to store it!

People's Chain Saw Sharpener Factory #8774

Seemed to have only interested itself in unboxing and skipped over how to set it up for a particular chain. (no doubt another video! :> )

Makes sense. Not the sort of thing you'd probably want to leave out, taking up bench space!
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snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo posted for all of us...

Jeezus you are too lazy to look something like this up yourself.
What a putz.
--
Tekkie

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Hi Ralph,
On 2/16/2016 4:30 PM, Ralph Mowery wrote:

Do you do that "by eye"? I.e., with the device powered off, lower it into/onto the blade until it's "where you want it". Then, set a "stop", retract the mechanism and begin sharpening?

OK, so it's going "in and out" (on an angle, from the side, so to speak) instead of "up and down".

Because of variations in chains? Or, because you can't get the new chain into exactly the same spot that the previous chain was in?

I've sharpened so many chains with a round file+guide that it's now almost second nature. But, I don't let a chain "get real bad" before touching it up. So, there's nothing discouraging me from doing it (whereas if I'd let the chain get really bad, I'd want to postpone sharpening it -- cuz it was going to be a big ordeal. That, in turn, means the chain will end up duller when I finally get around to doing it. <frown> Easier to just keep it sharp with a LITTLE effort so it only ever NEEDS a little effort!)

You should always stop "fooling with the saws" -- or any tool/activity, for that matter -- the day *before* you screw up! :>
I've inherited a few tools from a friend. Whenever I protest (i.e., I really don't need to OWN one of these -- esp if I can come borrow YOURS!), he holds up his mangled (injured) hands with missing parts as if to prove *he* doesn't need it, either!
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eye' and set a stop as to how far down you want it to cut. There is another adjustment as to where the chain stops at. Once you get the two or three adjustments made all you have to do is advance the chain to the next tooth and bring the wheel down. When this is done for all the teeth facing one direction you move the part that holds the chain to the othe side and then repeat the cutting of the othe teeth.

Because of the variations in the chain. If you start with a new chain for the first sharpening, the second sharpening will need to be adjusted to compensate for the removed material of the chain tooth.

It probably would be easier to hit it with a file if you have the skill to do it. I just don't seem to be able to develope that skill. I don't use the saw very much so don't get a chance to practice. For less than $ 30 it is about the cost of the files and guides. If it only sharpens about 10 chains it would be worth the cost.
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On 2/19/2016 10:54 AM, Ralph Mowery wrote:

OK. And, the chains where the chain length precludes "evenly spaced" teeth you would notice a cutter "in the wrong position" (it would be out of place by one or more "links" so unlikely you'll fail to notice)

OK.

No doubt! I'm overly concerned with storing things as we don't really have (enough) places to do so. E.g., no attic or basement so that leaves closets and garage. Garage gets warm -- even with insulated door -- and I'm not keen on reaching into boxes that have been out there (scorpions, black widow spiders, etc.).
So, I opt for small things that I can "inspect" at a glance ("Any spiders hiding in that mechanism?"). All of my "power tools" (larger items) are stored in "sealed" containers -- which means they take up even MORE space!
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On Mon, 15 Feb 2016 23:49:05 -0500, "Ralph Mowery"

Years ago, I bought one of those guides, and probably spent close to $30 for it. I was never happy with the results and I still wasted at least an hour on a chain. I think I got $2 for it when I sold it at an auction. Replacement chains are about $18 for my small saw. Hardly worth the cost of the guide, files, and all the time involved. In the time I spend shapening the chain, I can have a whole tree down and cut up. Time is money!
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On 02/15/2016 06:55 PM, Don Y wrote:

I'd stick with Dremel bits. I've never used HF Dremel bits but their drill bits are suitable for drilling softwood.
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On 2/15/2016 8:14 PM, rbowman wrote:

That's been my experience with other items that I'd expected to be "hardened". E.g., a tap & die set was a very ornate set of paperweights! (when tapping ALUMINUM and soft BRASS)
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Don Y wrote:

My HF tap and die set was OK , didn't like tapping 5/16" holes in 304 stainless though . Had 'em since like '03 or so , still chuggin' along . Except the 5/16-18 ...
--
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On Mon, 15 Feb 2016 18:55:50 -0700, Don Y

I have a bunch of those offshore diamond bits and they work for a while but get a bunch of them if you are doing any serious work.
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On 2/15/2016 8:38 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Do they just "go dull"? Or, more spectacular failures?
I tried using one of the cylindrical "grinding stones" to make a shallow "scallop" in the edge of some reasonably soft steel. All I succeeded in doing was wearing the stone down to nothing (as if I was dressing a grinding wheel!).
I took out a rat tail file and got the desired result with two or three strokes!
(i.e., I suspect the grinding stones are for use on plastic or balsa wood)
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Don Y wrote:

From this and other posts in this thread , you apparently don't know how to use a Dremel properly . I have a clamp and mount that attaches my Dremel to my machine lathe . I use it to finish grind precision bearing and other surfaces using those same stones you're complaining about . Most of the time it's about choosing the proper tool for the job . You should have grabbed the file first . Grinders - other than angle grinders , which are another subject entirely - are usually reserved for finishing operations rather than shaping or heavy stock removal . .
--
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On 2/15/2016 9:58 PM, Terry Coombs wrote:

Stand doesn't work when you're trying to deal with something fastened to the ceiling or *in* a wall. Hence the value of small, and handheld.
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wrote:

I never found those tiny dremel grinder bits to last long either (on metal). The one thing I did use mine for was grinding a nice (almost square) hole in a door frame for a door-knob striker plate. I'd just drill a 5/8" hole, then use the dremel tool to make a nice hole to fit the striker plate. Much nicer job than a chisel. That's probably the only real useful thing I got from that tool. If I need to cut off a bolt, I use my angle grinder. A $2 wheel will cut 30 bolts, but it would probably take $15 or $20 worth of dremel bits to cut one 3/8" bolt.
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On Mon, 15 Feb 2016 21:22:14 -0700, Don Y

The "diamond" part stops working pretty fast. I was cutting holes in glass and it took a bit per hole but the price was right.
I also had some of the stones and had the same result as you but it did get the (small) job done.
I tried a radial brass brush to clean up a battery holder and again, one bit, one job.
The real dremel bits seem a bit better.
Dremel tools are really just for working on tiny things anyway except for chain saws. If you get the real chain saw stone, they make sharpening a chain saw a couple minute thing. It is a lot faster than a file and it seems to be a lot easier if you don't have a jig. We have palm trees here and they will eat a chain (sand migrates up into the trunk) so sharpening is a constant thing.
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On 2/15/2016 10:12 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

So, just like other HF tools that "loose their edge" quickly. Drill bits can be resharpened; these more ornate "milling bits" are essentially use until discard...

Yeah, but CONSIDERABLY pricier. :<

Most things here are softwoods (though we have palms, as well -- I've just never felled one... too messy to *want* one!). Pick the right time of year (when sap isn't flowing) and they're a piece of cake. I felled a 25 ft Mulberry (some 40 feet in dia) with just a bow saw by carefully selecting *when* I did it.
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On Tue, 16 Feb 2016 00:12:54 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Really, I never knew that. How does the sand get into the tree trunk? That's weird!
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On Tue, 16 Feb 2016 05:20:51 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo wrote:

It gets pulled up with the water. This is not beach sand, it is a very fine grit but it will knock the edge off of chain saw teeth right away. The closer to the ground you get, the more sand so always start cutting up a palm log from the top and when you get about 6-8 feet from the root end, plan on sharpening your saw a couple times before you are done. If I really do not need to cut it off right at the ground, I will take a palm about eye high and leave the rest. After about a year, you can just push it over. The roots rot out pretty fast after it dies. On a sable, shove a bunch of air plants in the boots and it looks like you planned it to be that way.
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