Draining Hot Water Heaters

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On 02/16/2016 05:56 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:
[snip]

"Heating hot water" is preferable since it takes much less energy and time than heating cold water.
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On Wednesday, February 17, 2016 at 2:38:28 PM UTC-6, hah wrote:

It might be preferable...but more than likely, unnecessary!
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bob_villain wrote:

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On Wednesday, February 17, 2016 at 3:51:48 PM UTC-6, Tony Hwang wrote:

That happens at the mixer, remember...you wouldn't need a tank if you already had hot water!
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On 2/17/2016 4:01 PM, bob_villain wrote:

We had a new water heater installed a couple of years ago, but it had a problem with a gas smell around it, off and on. The installer came back several times looking for leaks in the gas line and couldn't find any, but still there was the smell of gas. At one point he adjusted the thermostat a bit higher so the water would be just a little bit hotter than previously, and no more gas smell after that adjustment was made.
I never understood how that adjustment would affect the gas smell issue, but the tank has worked well since then.
--
Maggie

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Muggles wrote:

Same smell can come from Sulphur rich water(often well water) Do you use well water?
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On 2/17/2016 4:10 PM, Tony Hwang wrote:

No, we use city water.
It took the installer 3 visits over about a weeks time looking for leaks before he adjusted the heating temperature on the tank. After he did that there was no gas smell at all.
--
Maggie

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Muggles wrote:

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On 2/17/2016 8:47 PM, Tony Hwang wrote:

ok So, if the temp is lower it's not high enough to burn all the gas feeding it?
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Maggie

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On Wed, 17 Feb 2016 22:06:19 -0600, Muggles

all water heaters have an adjustable shutter, but on those that do, a bad air adjustment can cause incomplete combustion, resulting in a mercapitan smell.
The thermostat doesn't affect the flame at all - all it does is turn the fire on and off depending on water temperature.
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On 2/17/2016 10:15 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I'm not sure about any shutter, but it's possible he could have done that. I was just glad the gas smell stopped.
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Maggie

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On 2/17/2016 11:06 PM, Muggles wrote:

|| [christmas presents]
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Muggles wrote:

NG when burning normally flame tips look blue in color. Yellowish color means poor combustion due to lack of fresh air or too much gas. In the case of car you can smell gasoline or black smoke(unburned gasoline) out of tail pipe. Also gas pressure feeding water heater or furnace have to be correct. Your gas meter has a pressure regulator. Your gas BBQ has a pressure regulator, etc. My house is built on R2000 specs back then. If I don't bring in outside fresh air, furnace and water heater will be starving for combustion air causing danger of CO level rising indoor.
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On 2/18/2016 11:14 AM, Tony Hwang wrote:

Ok I understand. Thanks!
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Maggie

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On Wednesday, February 17, 2016 at 4:07:18 PM UTC-6, Muggles wrote:

...now you'll get all theorists chiming-in, good God!
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On 2/17/2016 4:12 PM, bob_villain wrote:

Well, at least it's a home repair topic! LOL Maybe someone with more experience than the guy who installed our water heater has heard of this before.
I haven't touched the thermostat because I'm afraid if I change it, it'll start having that gas smell again.
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On 2/16/2016 4:28 PM, SeaNymph wrote:

How "hard" is your domestic water supply?
The "textbook" recommendations include: - replacing the sacrificial anode (it "corrodes", bt design) - draining the tank (mineral accumulations) - "testing" the high temperature/pressure relief valve
But, almost all of these can find folks with associated horror stories.
It's not possible to replace the anode in ours with a "stock" anode (no clearance above the tank to withdraw and insert). [though I think someone makes a "hinged" anode for this reason]
If the drain valve breaks (some are plastic!) or refuses to reseal properly (drip, drip, drip), you're faced with replacing it. You may not be able to find a suitable replacement (many tanks are glass lined; metal into glass is a big FAIL)
Likewise, testing the TPR valve can leave you with a valve that no longer closes. In addition to depriving you of future hot water, you may also end up with *no* water (if there is not a shutoff on the intake and outtake of the water heater so you can isolate it from the COLD water supply!)
Bottom line: don't do any of these the day before you have house guests scheduled to arrive!
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On 2/16/2016 6:06 PM, Don Y wrote:

We're on a well so all of our water is softened. No hard water here.
The water heater is heavily insulated.
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On 02/16/2016 06:09 PM, SeaNymph wrote:

Water here is soft. Heater that was here when I bought the house lasted 30 years, without ever being drained.
The once or twice a year advice would be for hard water
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Since women like things HARD, does that mean they like HARD WATER?
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