Draining Hot Water Heaters

Page 1 of 4  
I apologize if this was discussed before my time.
We have an 85 gallon Marathon water heater, which I really like. I've read different things about periodically training water heaters and I don't know what to believe.
I'm not sure if its necessary, just wondering what others think.
--
Visualize "Whirled Peas"

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Yes, at least once a year. Twice is better.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/16/2016 5:50 PM, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo wrote:

And is this something that I can do or is it best left to the professionala?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload


It is very complicated. AOn the side near the bottom is what looks like a water spicket. You cut off the breaker if electric powered or cut to the pilot light or off if gas. Cut off the water going to it. Then you hook up a water hose to it or some other way to get rid of the water and open the valve. On top is a relief valve that you want to open so air can get into the water heater. Sometimes the relef valve will not reseat and you have to replace it. Then fill the heater back up after cutting off the drain valve and apply the power or gas. You may want to turn on the hot water valve at a sink to help the air get out of the system.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/16/2016 7:31 PM, Ralph Mowery wrote:

Why so complicated? Hook a hose from the spigot to a drain. Open the valve, let the water pressure blow some sediment out. Don't touch the power or TP valve.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 17 Feb 2016 02:30:35 -0500, Stormin Mormon

+1. No need to drain-to-empty. All you need to be doing is flushing a few gallons out the bottom to remove the sediment.
--
Web based forums are like subscribing to 10 different newspapers
and having to visit 10 different news stands to pickup each one.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Depends a lot on the water heater. I might consider draining an electric heater, but have found it a total waste of time on gas - but then I buy the better heater with the "turbulator tube" that does not allow any sediment to build up.
I have not been following the thread - so this may have been mentioned - but the "drain valve" on MOST water heaters is so pitiful that even if you drained it monthly it would never last the life of the water heater. Many fail the first time they are used. Cheap chinese plastic crap. That is one more difference between cheap and better quality heaters. The good ones get rebuildable brass drain valves.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload


Ditto to that. A neighbor had a leaking water heater a few years ago. I remember having a hard time opening the plastic valve without risking breaking it. Mfr probably saved $10 cost.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/17/2016 8:46 AM, Snuffy "Hub Cap" McKinney wrote:

I'm sure they saved *much* less than $10!
People would be amazed to know what things actually cost. And, in most cases, unable to understand why the *price* was so much higher ("Wow! Look at all that PROFIT!")
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 17 Feb 2016 07:46:15 -0800, "Snuffy \"Hub Cap\" McKinney"

Would you believe less than a dollar at manufacturer's cost??? Mabee as much as $2 on a real good day.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 17 Feb 2016 20:14:32 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

When they break or leak, I just replace them with a solid brass spigot.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/16/2016 7:04 PM, SeaNymph wrote:

Many HO do their own water heater drains. You can likely find instructions on the web. In my case, the WH drain points out the cabinet door, out to the ground. Once or so each year I open the valve, and let the water and sediment blow out to the ground.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload


I've

I have always heard this and never done it. Unless there's something I don't know, which is very likely, the sediment would be in the bottom. If the valve is in the bottom, sediment would flow out first. If the valve is 6-inch above the bottom like mine and unless there is a pipe inside taking water from the very bottom of the tank, the sediment would never drain out.
I did test the pressure relief valve every few months on a previous water heater as recommended, starting when it was a couple of years old. Within a couple of years it got so it wouldn't reseat completely and always dripped after that.
Latest water heater sits in the corner of the garage with a drain pan underneath that is plumbed outside, and the relieve vent plumbed to outside. I'm not touching it until it stops working or blows up.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
message news:7eadnfXAiqZ2IF7LnZ2dnUU7-I have always heard this and never done it. Unless there's something I don't know, which is very likely, the sediment would be in the bottom. If the valve is in the bottom, sediment would flow out first. If the valve is 6-inch above the bottom like mine and unless there is a pipe inside taking water from the very bottom of the tank, the sediment would never drain out.

I have never drained a water heater either. Heard it is good for them,but never did . Last house I lived in for 35 years and had to replace the heater one time due to a leak. Bought this house about 10 years ago with an electric heater and never touched it either.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 16 Feb 2016 19:34:13 -0500, "Ralph Mowery"

The 6 inches is on the OUTER SHELL of the heater. It's probably 1 to 2 inches above the bottom on the actual tank (inside that shell). Most of the crud will come out, but not all of it. If you drain the tank, then turn on the cold water while the drain valve is still open, more crud will come out.
If you live in an area where there is excessive lime (calcium) in the water, you may never get it all out, especially if you have not drained it in years.
Not only does this prolong the life of the heater, but it saves energy. A gas heater has the flame under the tank. If there is 6" of crud in the bottom of the tank, you're heating that crud, not the water. But soem of the heat will transfer thru the crud and eventually heat the water. But a lot of the heat is wasted and goes up the chimney.
I once saw a water heater that was half filled with lime. I'm not exaggerating either. After the heater was replaced, the guy took off the shell, then sawed the tank in half. A 5ft tall tank had over 2 feet of lime in it. It was an elec, heater. The bottom element never touched water and was all twisted and deformed (and electrically dead) from operating in that lime. They could not even take one shower anymore before the hot water ran out.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/16/2016 6:28 PM, SeaNymph wrote:

I've found that it's a good idea to drain the sediment once a year or so. However, doing so does not train the WH to do it by itself. You have to do it for the WH.
Why do you heat hot water? Most folks have cold water heaters.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/16/2016 5:56 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Damn it. Can't hot water heaters learn?
As for the hot water, it's heated at certain times and then stays hot. The thing doesn't heat water constantly.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/16/2016 7:05 PM, SeaNymph wrote:

Splendid! How did you train it periodically to heat?
As to draining. The drain valve is generally about two inches from the bottom of the tank. They often have garden hose thread. You may wish to run a hose from the WH to a drain. The valves some times stick closed, as few people drain them as needed.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/16/2016 7:21 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

I didn't have to train it, it came pre-trained. I think that's a function of the type of water heater it is. Costs me almost nothing to use it because it's set to only heat water during off peaks times.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I all ways heat the hot water. Who wants the cold water to come out hot.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.