Drain pipe in wall to washer outlet?

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Anybody know any good step-by-step instructions for going from a 2 1/4 inch plug in a vertical 'plastic' drain pipe (at the floor level) inside the wall to the washer's outlet?
I know, I know, a search but you guys KNOW this stuff and can do a simple paragraph *and* most importantly any 'gotchas' .
Embarrassingly, over the years I have NEVER gotten a drain system to work right, always leaked/dripped, ie around one of those work sink drop inlets, no amount of plumber's putty, nor teflon tape ever solved these types of problems. Even a simple J-Trap would start leaking in less than a year! In defense, it was one of those 'thin' metal ones from HD and our chemicals ate through its lowest section. THAT taught me to use plastic, but still...I finally gave up and simply put plastic glue on the threads. Now THAT worked. but posed other problems.
I would like to avoid that permanent scenario this time. Future cutting the pipe out of the wall is not a viable option.
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The only thing I know, is that the washing machine hose has to go over the level of the washer basket. The discharg hose hooks on the back with a clamp. The hose is maybe three feet long, and ends with upside down J. The loop part of the J needs to be higher than the top of the basket.
So, you've got to get various fittings, and make a rigid tube that goes up from the floor, to about the level of the top of the washing machine. Hard to explain in text.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Anybody know any good step-by-step instructions for going from a 2 1/4 inch plug in a vertical 'plastic' drain pipe (at the floor level) inside the wall to the washer's outlet?
I know, I know, a search but you guys KNOW this stuff and can do a simple paragraph *and* most importantly any 'gotchas' .
Embarrassingly, over the years I have NEVER gotten a drain system to work right, always leaked/dripped, ie around one of those work sink drop inlets, no amount of plumber's putty, nor teflon tape ever solved these types of problems. Even a simple J-Trap would start leaking in less than a year! In defense, it was one of those 'thin' metal ones from HD and our chemicals ate through its lowest section. THAT taught me to use plastic, but still...I finally gave up and simply put plastic glue on the threads. Now THAT worked. but posed other problems.
I would like to avoid that permanent scenario this time. Future cutting the pipe out of the wall is not a viable option.
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On Mar 6, 7:23 am, "Stormin Mormon"

My last installation of sticking the J-tube down a very long chrome drain pipe held up against the wall like that yielded 'squirting' out the tiny vent slot! from time to time.
I was kind of hoping for a list from HD, and some experienced, "Watch out for...."'s.
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It's likely the plug is there as a code required clean-out, so you can't use it, now would you want to. Next, assuming the existing is just a vertical waste line with no trap, then you need a trap. And behind that trap you need a vent line. That is usually the real fly in the ointment because unless there is one you can legitimately tie into, you normally would need to run one all the way out the roof. If that isn't feasible, as is often the case you can use an air admittance valve. That's basicly a check valve that allows air into the drain system, but won't let water flow out. Then you need a vertical pipe up to the height of the washer.
So you have to cut out a section of the existing waste line. Then you'll add in sequence:
sanitary tee fitting in existing line air admittance valve or vent line trap pipe up to height of top of washer
To glue back into the existing pipe you'll need REPAIR couplings. Those look like any other coupling except they don't have a stop ridge in the center. So, you can slide them all the way on both ends of the new piece then move them back over the ends of the existing pipe. A little tricky and you have to be quick as the glue is setting. Alternative is to use a Fernco type on one end.
Also make sure you use the right materials. If existing line is ABS, use that. If it's PVC use that. You can't join PVC to ABS by gluing, it's not permitted by code, at least not here. You can use Fernco type couplings, but if it's cheaper and more reliable to stick with glue where possible.
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wrote:

This is new construction with everything else installed - the hot/cold pair, 6 inch vent pipe to outside, 220Vac, etc
The drain pipe looks like a 'hurry up and make it look finished so we can get out of here' cover.
Don't think it's for cleanout since it is a T junction. and cleanouts tend to be 45 angles elsewhere.
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That's a very strange way to leave it and would not seem to have anything to do with hurrying up. If it was installed correcly with a trap and vent, then all that was needed was to glue in about a 4ft section of pipe instead of that fitting and plug. Is it visible from the basement to check for a trap? Sounds like it's probably there, but can't hurt to check if possible. If you have a trap, then all you need is a piece of 1 1/2" or 2" pipe up to the level of the top of the washer and a male adapter that's the same size as the plug to glue on the end. Use teflon tape on the threads.
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wrote:

After posting the above, I took another look and this part is puzzling:
"Anybody know any good step-by-step instructions for going from a 2 1/4 inch plug in a vertical 'plastic' drain pipe (at the floor level) inside the wall to the washer's outlet? "
How can you see it and access it if the plug terminating what's there is inside the wall at floor level? Perhaps some pics would help.
In the new construction in these parts, NJ, plumbers use one of the washer connection box units where the drain and water supply valves terminate in a recessed box inside the wall at a height near the top of the washer.
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wrote:

thanks for that one, the box is there for the hot/cold, and saw a tube, no idea what that was for. Looks like a flexible 3/4 inch OD creasible type.
I'll see if I can find out whether a trap is in there
there's an 'unfinished hole in the wall to view its contents. A temporary cosmetic cover was over the hole.
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That doesn't sound right either. Here's a link to a typical washer box that supports 1.5" or 2" drain:
http://www.hardwareandtools.com/Oatey-38934-2-Inch-Washing-Machine-Outlet-Box-u261555.html?utm_source=Google%20Products&utm_medium=Product%20Search&utm_campaign=Google%20Products
If the link doesn't work. just google "washer connection box". I don't know what you're looking at that's 3/4", but it sounds more like the hose that comes with the washer than the drain that should be in the house for the washer. The drain should be 1 1/2" or 2".

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wrote:

that looks about like it, but ours has two drain plugs to snap out and the hot/cold are both to the right side.
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It's unbelievable they left it like that. If I understand it correcly, what you have is the typical washer connection box in the wall, at a height near the top of the washer, with the water valves connected and working. The box has knockout for 2 different size drains, but none is being used. Then in the wall area near the floor, you have some kind of hole in the drywall where you can see the top of a plug that;s in a 2" waste line.
So, what's apparently missing is the run of pipe from where that plug is up to the box. Is there a trap visible? Or if there is a basement below it could be there. Should be a trap, but since they half-assed it, who knows? If you have the trap, then all you need to do is connect that missing pipe. Unfortunately, that will mean opening up the drywall.
And since the box is already in and connected, you'll probably have to do it in 3 sections. One section of pipe near the bottom with a male adaptor so that it will screw into where the plug is. Another section at the top where it will fit into the box in the wall. And then a third piece in the middle which you will insert last and use repair type couplings to join it to the other two pieces.
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wrote:

THANKS TO ALL!!!
Inside the wall, propoerly attached to the box is a plastic Y that then becomes a plastic drain pipe on down to a ....J Trap! and into the side of the drain pipe that has a 'clean out' plug exposed via a very badly finished hole through the dry wall.
Lesson Learned: NEVER ASSUME! I have never seen these plastic boxes for washer connection before. The drain access inside the plastic box looked more decorative, than functional, purely cosmetic and sealed. The very badly finished hole in the wall revealing the plug in the side of the drain pipe made me think "rushed, didn't finish" so I assumed I would have to add a J-Trap and drain to that location!
But thanks to you all. I found that the washer connection is complete, PLUS even has a cleanout access!
Never saw any of this stuff before, because that part of the drywall is perfectly finished. Even the box is mounted better than the outlets so really difficult to see through any slots to see that drain pipe.
Ok, now why two drain holes the same size?
and inside the box, what's that plastic tube coming down from the top for? not a pipe, but tube that is thin walled so creased where it's folded behind the faucets.
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wrote: ..snip...
???
the tube is white plastic vinyl like about 9/16 OD and is inserted into another tube, beige in color, just large enough to hold it. The white tube has no termination and is folded over creasing it where it's stored inside the recess of the 'washer box'
the white tube can slip up and down into the other tube [which is rigidly mounted] and feels like there's a lot of weight above pushing down.
almost looks like separate water supply like near a fridge, but seems to be a lot larger. I have NO idea what's at the other end of this tube.
So again the washer box has two identically sized drain plugs then hot/ cold faucets, but coming down from inside the top is this non-robust white plastic tube that can slip inside another rigidly mounted tube.
soft water feed? or something along that line? Definitely part of the washeer box.
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Sounds about the size of tubing for a condensate drain. Is there a condensing furnace or AC located somewhere that could be connected to it, either by gravity or a condensate pump? The condensate has to go somewhere and routing it to a washing machine drain is a popular option.

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Sounds like the ground level drain is the primary and the one located higher up is the aux overflow. That's a good way of doing it, with the idea being if the primary clogs up, you'll see the water coming out up higher on the side of the house and know something is wrong.
The AC in the attic should have a pan with a float switch in it to cut it off in case the pan fills. It would be a good idea to make sure it's there and working.

I guess it depends how curious you are. It's possible the plumbers roughed in that extra line up to some point for possible use for the attic AC, but the HVAC guys didn't use it. It's possible it doesn;t go anywhere, just ends above the box in the drywall, etc.
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put some compressed air back up from below, might make searching easier.
look for insulation moving or air leaking sound
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good idea!
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wrote:

Now, HOW to remove the plastic plug that blocks access to the drain inside the 'washer connection box'?
I could just go after it with a sawzall, but does anybody know whether this thing breaks out, or unscrews, or ...?
One last irksome...The dryer vent access is an excellent metal panel [for fire safety] and has a large insert area to store extra vent hose as you slide the dryer back against the wall. However! the idiots placed it on the wrong side of the stud! Not centered behind the dryer, but more like centered BETWEEN the washer dryer! Is this ok? standard pratise? just ignore and squash the vent hose and live with it?
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I guess that depends on what kind of plug it is. If it's a screw type plumbing plug with a square head on it, then is should unscrew. But, I didn't think those wall boxes had a threaded opening, just regular pipe.

A pic would help.

Usually the dryer can't and doesn't need to go back all the way anyway. On mine the vent exists and makes a 90 turn, hence the dryer is probably 6" or so from the wall. So, I don't see any problem with where yours is located. And what's the alternative? Tear open the wall and re-route it?
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wrote:

Ok, I'll leave alone.
Since posting I've found several descriptions for removing the 'test cap'
so I guess it's just "have at it" and break it out.
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