Drain field for washing machine only

I have a 30 year old septic system and the guy who pumped it out recently tried to sell me on having a separate leach field installed for the washing machine. He says it would prolong the life of the main septic system, espeically now that our kids are getting to the age where we are doing lots of laundry. It sounds logical, considering the washing machine dumps lots of water, detergent and bleach into the main system. Our old wash machine is 12 years old and showing signs of its age. I will probably be getting a new unit within a year that uses less water.
But I wanted to get more opinions before I do anything.
If I do go through with it, it will mean running a drain line through a wall into the garage, then running it along the inside wall of the garage about 20 feet and through the exterior wall before going underground. Any concerns there?
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On Feb 11, 9:53am, snipped-for-privacy@hboi.edu wrote:

Make it oversize, properly sloped and with cleanouts in case it gets clogged and you should have no problem with a french drain for your washer. Septic guy knows that synthetic lint will clog your leach field .
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On Mon, 11 Feb 2008 06:53:51 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@hboi.edu wrote:

I have been recycling the waste water from my washing machine for 25 years. I just pump it out on the ground under the banana trees and they love it. I just have a small pile of pea gravel right where the pipe ends to prevent erosion.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:
... > I just pump it out on the ground under the banana trees and

benick wrote: ... > NOT in Maine you can't...It HAS to go into septic....
Banana trees don't grow in Maine.
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Your guy is correct. You never want to run your washer into a septic system. What you CAN do however, is just stick a pipe out the back and put a splash block under it and forget it.
Or if you have a gravel driveway by chance, it can run down it. Many options. You certainly don't need the expense of an elaborate leach field just for a washer.
s

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wrote:

I assume the rocks in Maine do not perk and anything that hits the ground keeps going until it falls into the sea.
There are still plenty of places where the water from a washing machine would not travel more than a few feet before it soaks into the ground. They are trying to get us to recycle water like this here and not irrigate with potable water.
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benick wrote:

MAINE: GRAYWATER: 1509.0 Separated Laundry Disposal Systems. The plumbing inspector may approve a separate laundry system for single-family dwelling units. A separated laundry field requires an application for subsurface waste water disposal system completed by a licensed site evaluator and a permit to install the system. Only waste water from a washing machine may be discharged to the separate laundry disposal field designed for that purpose. Separate laundry disposal fields may be designed and used for hot tubs or backwash water. A separated laundry disposal field does not require a septic tank.
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Google "graywater" and sites such as www.oasisdesign.net/greywater/ will tell you a lot about using washer drain water ( and other non-toilet waste water) for irrigation. Any water that has been used in the home, except water from toilets, is called grey water. Dish, shower, sink, and laundry water comprise 50-80% of residential "waste" water. This may be reused for other purposes, especially landscape irrigation.
There can be permit and legal issues, so probably best to check into it. Surprisingly detergents and bleach are generally such a small percent of the waters content, they don't pose any real threat to vegetation. Besides, they are going into your leach field anyway, so they're getting into the environment eventually either way.

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I'm on sand, so I could just pump right into the yard and it will go straight down. Not sure local codes will allow, but assuming they do, I will have about a 50 foot run (including a couple 90 degree bends) cause I need to go through some walls as discussed in my first post. What is the minimum size pipe I should use. I want it as small as possible.
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On Mon, 11 Feb 2008 10:21:31 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@hboi.edu wrote:

I used 1 1/2 for the stack and transitioned to 2" once I got through the wall (mostly because that is what I had). 1 1/2 would probably be fine. Use DWV elbows so you don't have a clogging point. They are the radius curves, not the sharp right angled ones.
Just some Gee Whiz info, if you look at the MSDS on various detergents you will notice the powders seem generally better for the environment than liquids. They are basically soda ash where the liquids are borates. It will bring down the pH of the soil but if you mulched with pine straw it is probably a "wash"
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On Mon, 11 Feb 2008 06:53:51 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@hboi.edu wrote:

Will the Filtrol 160 work for you? http://www.filtrol160.com /
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Yes. I wondered about filters, but just thought the detergent was bad too. Sounds like the lint is worst.
Thanks for the help.
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replying to borne, DJ wrote:

STEP One: Become familiar with related codes in your area. Often a person can be fined HEAVILY for taking the actions suggested thus far[although there are some splendid suggestions]. Step Two: This what I have done in the past: 1- Dig a hole large enough to accommodate a 55 gal drum and a considerable amount of rock. Best to use rock NOT in the limestone family[it tends to breakdown and become almost like a crush-n-run after a period of repeated water saturation... clogging the drainage area]. 2- Drill MULTIPLE holes in the drum for drainage. 3- Apply a layer of rock in the bottom of the dug hole before drum placement 4-6 inches should suffice... more is better in this application. 4- Set drum[as upright as possible], begin filling around drum with rock... you want the rock around the drum wide enough to allow leaching [min 18-24 inches]... this will alter with type of soil in area. Also note that during the draining process, a sandy soil may leach back into the rock bed causing blockage. Two cycles of an older washing machine will darn near fill a 55 gal drum. Many of the newer machines use considerably less water. 5- Run the drainage line to the larger bung-hole of the drum... some elect to go with oversized piping which is a good move also and can be done by cutting a mating diameter hole in the UPPER SIDE of the drum just below where the lid fits. 6-Seal entry connection with a marine type caulking, as best you can. [This side entry also is good because it maintains a better, straight, direct, flow]. 7- Finish filling area around drum with rock. Cover drum with rock a few inches... 8- top that with heavy mil plastic layer... another thin layer of rock and finish covering with dirt/topsoil. Here is another option I did. The secondary bung-hole should have inserted in it a small piece of thick wall PVC that comes up ABOVE ground level but below lawn-mower level. It should be well sealed at point it enters the drum. This is to allow air to escape and thusly no back pressure to the washing machine and if water comes through this pipe you know that the leaching process is not fast enough for the machine use. Corrections will need to be made. The same steps can apply for "two drum" systems which may be an option dependent on amount of use. Expense incurred: Cost of the drum[s], additional piping, sealant/caulking, rock[ I found recycled concrete works good, size #4{it has *some* limestone... however during the recycling process most of that characteristic is removed. If you pick it up/not delivered under $20 a ton], your labor. The labor worth varies according to type of ground you are working in ;o)
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DJ posted for all of us...
I may not have read all messages.

I think (my opinion only) is that a premade plastic french drain tank would be better, it would have the holes in it and have a cover that one would not have to kludge fittings into.
--
Tekkie

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On Tue, 30 Sep 2014 12:44:02 -0700, DJ

Our septic guy said we were allowed 600 gal per day. There's NO way we can go through 600 gal per day!
BUT, he said be careful because the water from underwear laundry contains ecoli.
... However, you can solve that potential problem by 'prewashing' underwear in a bleach solution.
People constantly prewash their dishes, but rarely prewash their clothing.
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On Wed, 01 Oct 2014 06:58:52 -0700, RobertMacy

Why not just wipe your butt? This E-coli thing in your underwear is pretty much bullshit (not to mix metaphors) One squirrel turd will have more E-coli than you would have in all the underwear you wash in a week.
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