Drain connector in older laundry tub is deteriorating

I have a laundry sink made of what looks like concrete in my basement. The house is about 50 years old, I don't know if the sink itself is that old.
Under the sink, there is an small extension where the drains are located. This is the rusty-looking thing at the top of the picture in the URL below.
There is some kind of bushing which is screwed into this extension into which the drain pipe is inserted that prevents water from running onto the floor (this is the white thing on the left of the pipe at the top).
This bushing, which I think is made of rubber, is deteriorating and has broken off on the right side of the pipe, so that water is running out from a crack between the drain pipe and the extension under the sink -- not a lot, but enough to be annoying.
Does anyone know if this bushing is some part which is still available? I have checked a few online sites for information, and can't find anything...
http://www3.telus.net/~mjq/sink.jpg
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"Mr. Mike" wrote

I took a peek and recognize it as something I used to have under my sink though smaller. When it went, we had the sink piping upgraded and a new stainless steel sink put in. The old porcelin one was stained beyond recovery (which wouldnt matter in a laundry but did in the kitchen).
I remember the plumber mentioning that it was best to just replace with PVC as some of my older stuff wasnt sold anymore or if it was, was very expensive and normally only used now in reconstructing old houses to 'historical specs'. It definately wasnt worth extra money fr under the sink <g>.
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Fix it the way I fixed my leaky concrete sink many years ago:
- Locate the nearest drain connection that is in good condition. - Open up that connection with a pipe wrench. - If the concrete sink is attached to the wall with brackets, remove those. - Turn off the supply lines and disconnect the faucets. - Making sure your toes are out of the way, tilt the sink forward and let it fall sharply onto the concrete slap. - Put the pieces in a wheel barrel and take them out to the trash. - Install a new fiberglass sink with PVC drain pipes and a new faucet.
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On Thu, 1 May 2008 13:18:10 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

...snip...
Agreed. When those old concrete beasts start leaking it's nearly impossible to make a good repair.
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the labor of writing a check to an old plumber is the easiest thing to do. see fernco adapters at: http://www.fernco.com/ note you will miss the sturdy quiet old sink. if you replace it with anything lighter in weight it will be noisier.
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