Drain connection to sewer for condensate drain?

Anyone with experience in typical plumbing codes have advice on this? I need to route the condensate drain on a high efficiency furnace/AC to an appropriate drain.
It appears that going outside is not a good idea, because it's subject to freezing here and also I'm not keen on putting extra water near the foundation in the most logical area. I don't have sump pump, so can't drain it to a sump basin.
Here it's permitted and apparently a preferred method to route it into the sewer system. The simplest way would be to route it to a laundry sink drain. Problem is I don't have one in the basement and the first floor one is on the other side of the basement and running anything up there to it isn't going to be easy either.
So, what I came up with is this. I have a shower on the first floor that is within range. The trap is accessible with maybe 7 inches of DWV pipe between it and the shower drain. I am looking to connect into there, above the trap. I've seen online where HVAC guys have tapped into all kinds of sewer or sewer vent lines using some kind of barbed fitting where they just drill a hole and screw it in. But I know some or all of them don;t meet code. But I'm wondering if you do it in the right place, ie it's protected by a trap, is that kind of connection code compliant? And what kind of fitting would one use? I don't recall seeing any barbed fitting other than standard pipe threads. Would think you'd need some different thread to screw into a hole drilled into DWV pipe.
Or alternatively, let's say I cut the drain pipe, install a wye fitting, reduce it down to a barbed fitting and then connect the hose to that, is that code compliant? I would think it would be, but not sure.
Any thoughts?
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On 12/24/2011 7:41 AM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

with the water.
Paul
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Why does the condensate need a trap if there is already a trap in the shower drain?
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In some situations, the furnace is slightly below atmospheric pressure. With an open drain, the inrush of air prevents the water from draining properly. More often a problem with AC condensate drains.
Please consider a condensate pump, and move the water to a highe spot, like going into the top of a drain line.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Why does the condensate need a trap if there is already a trap in the shower drain?
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On Sat, 24 Dec 2011 16:37:41 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

I don't have a trap on mine. It's all 3/4" PVC running to the sump. All gravity. If you have a condensate pump and tank, your idea of going to the closet drain is fine. Check your local codes. You are talking about running the condensate line from near the basement floor to ceiling height, right? If the condensate pump check valve is near the pump, the line going to the shower drain will always be full. So you can use a saddle instead of a Y above the trap. Saves space and work.
--Vic.
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Yes.
Check valve is on the pump.

What do you call those saddle valves for a drain? Sounds like exactly what I need. Only ones I'm familiar with are the type for copper water lines.
Thanks!
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wrote:

As they used to say on Saturday Night Live, "Never mind...."
I figured out what you are talking about. I've actually used them on water lines, but I called them snap-on tees because they snap over the pipe. Googling for saddle tee I found DWV versions. Thanks for the suggestion as I was not thinking of one for this and it would be a time saver.
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On Sun, 25 Dec 2011 06:42:31 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

Pipe saddle http://www.mcmaster.com/#pvc -(schedule-40)-pipe-fittings/=fin994
You may be able to find something cheaper, but this will work.
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In your setup you dont have to worry about any obnoxious gases backing up into it. Not only is sewer gas stinky it is corrosive. Dont trust the check valve on the condensate pump. We use them here at work on our humidifiers and both failed within a year. I think we put in a Watts check valve and it has had no problem since. Use a trap anyway it keeps things out of the pump you dont want in it as condensate is often contaminated with mold and algae.. Use some couplings so you can take it apart if it ever becomes clogged.. The other line of thought is glue it all up and put the couplings in when and if you ever need them.
Jimmie
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On 12/24/2011 10:41 AM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Mine goes into the French drain where the system is located. There is not that much water and drain is only wet for first 5 feet or so. I have no real water problem and no sump pump.
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wrote:

Easiest way is start with saddle tee to a handy vent line. NIBCO, others have them, Google a search for online catalogs to get the right part number you want and go to a real plumbing distributor. Glue it on, drill the hole, run the line with a homemade trap using a return (180 degree) bend and you should be good to go in an hour.
Joe
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Isn't tapping into a sewer vent line for a condensate drain or any kind of drain a plumbing code violation? And even if it's legal, since this is the basement, that isn't going to be easy.
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wrote:

I tapped into the sewer, then I had a flood backup, it flooded and ruined my furnace. Plan ahead.
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On 12/24/2011 9:41 AM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Most common is an indirect connection where the furnace drain goes to something like a floor drain and drains through an air gap. Several of the posts are an indirect connection.
Or there is a condensate pump at the furnace that pumps to an indirect connection.
If you actually connect into the sewer pipes the furnace drain likely needs sewer system features including a trap, a vent, and correctly sized pipe.
Plumbing codes vary, but in my limited experience that is what codes are likely to want.
--
bud--

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Sorry for not making it clear. There is a condensate pump and that is how the condensate would get from the furnace up to the first floor shower drain pipe.

Which I believe I have, since it will connect above the shower trap. So it will be very similar to a dishwasher connection to a sink drain.

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On 12/25/2011 8:45 AM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

A short search gave http://www.hartell.com/Files/Hartell/Global/US-en/site_files/KTP_Instructions.pdf 10. Condensate can be drained out a window, along the air conditioner freon line to outdoors, to a french drain or floor drain, sump pit, or to a laundry tub or sink. (Leave an air gap between the end of the discharge tube and drain). 11. Comply with all local codes for discharge water requirements.
These are all indirect wastes through an air gap, not directly into the sewer system.
The short search didn't turn up anything else specific.
Ask an inspector? Codes may vary on this.
Furnace condensate is somewhat acidic, if I remember right.
--
bud--

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wrote:

It will be acidic because it picks up CO2 from the air and created carbonic acid. It is a fairly weak acid tho.
In my case I ended up with a mini-split evaporator on the wall behind a bathroom so I snaked the condensate line down the wall, installed a "garbage disposal" type tail piece in the sink drain, above the trap and let it go there.
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