Double Pane window - Internal Condensation

I have a double pane window that is showing a fair amount of internal condensation after our Southern California rain storms.
Is there a remedial re-sealing/repair option available, or is it "new window" time?
Joe
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Joe S wrote:

There is no way to fix the unit, but you can replace just the glass and that is usually reasonably priced.
How old is the window and do you know what kind of warrantee came with it. It may be covered.
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Joseph Meehan

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Joseph Meehan wrote:

The window is almost exactly 20 years old...house was built sometime in '85. I do not know the manufacturer...it came with the house when I bought it 16 years ago. Is the frame usually stamped with the mfg name when you remove the trim or pull the window out?
Unfortunately, it's about 5' x 6' and is set in a second story bay...not the easiest access in the world!
Any guesstimates on what a 'reasonable' price is for a window like this? Are we talking $100? $200? $300? More?
Joe
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Probably not an easy fix. I imagine you would need to drill two holes in one pane only, bake the moisture out by forcing hot dry air in one hole and out the other, back fill with nitrogen and seal the holes. Then there is the question of how did that water get in there in the first place.
Can't imagine that process costing less than replacing the window or at least the pane (unless it is a particularly large window) especially if the window must be removed to do it. Frankly, I don't even know if this process is offered by contractors.

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I don't believe that the OP was asking you to use your imagination. Heck, I can imagine many solutions, including having the tooth fairy come and wave a magic wand to fix it.
Have you ever done the above process successfully yourself or seen someone else do it on a residential install? If not, why do you feel compelled to make things up when someone is asking for an experienced answer.

Again, I don't believe the OP was asking you to use your imagination :)

So why are you suggesting it then?
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New window time, a plus is a new Low E Argon will perform much better if you old did not have it.
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First thing is to determine the brand and age and whether still under warranty. Some brands have 20 year warranties against leakage.

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I have the same problem, the seal leaked and condensation forms between the pains. You can't fix this and you need to replace the glass. Getting replacement glass was very expensive because the manufacturer of my windows went out of business. I decided to replace the windows. Ron

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Ron wrote:

Normally replacement glass can be made up for you by a local shop. Small towns may not have such a shop, but most larger cities will have them. They can do a lot of custom work to reproduce the glass in almost any existing window.

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