Double disposals

I had an idea today about installing a second garbage disposal in my kitchen, so I'd have one in either basin. It'd be swell for the way I use the kitchen.
This is something I haven't seen before. Aside from the obvious drawback (higher cost), is there any reason this would be a bad idea?
Thanks, -Scott
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running one could possibly push garbage into the other when not being used, or even just into the other's drain tube, and could then dry and get clogged up
not supposed to be good idea to run hot water through garbage disposals, prematurely ages them (though hot water drained from dishwashers is often routed through garbage disposals), you won't have a nongarbage disposal side to run hot water through
more danger, more possibility for accident
running both at the same time could overwhelm your drain if you had a lot of water in both sinks, unless they could be wired on one switch which would turn one or the other on, but not both
some say draining a dishwasher through a garbage disposal makes it stay cleaner, you'd have to y the dishwasher drain into both garbage disposals if you wanted that arrangement
dishwasher drains into garbage disposals, if garbage disposals aren't kept clean and drain line from dishwasher gets clogged up, dishwasher might not drain properly etc., with two garbage disposals, you doublt the possibility
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effi wrote:

Maybe, but the intended function of a disposer is to grind up SMALL bits of food washed off kitchenware, NOT to be stuffed full of potato peelings, corncobs and other detrius by a lazy cook. That stuff properly belongs in the kitchen garbage can, and it usually takes less time to grab it and toss it in the can than it does for the disposal to get rid of it, 'eh. If more folks used disposers properly they'd last longer and clog less frequently.

Aw, c'mon, pray tell us what parts of the disposal can get "aged" by hot water? even the rotating seals are carbon on ceramic, so what's a few more degrees of temperature going to do to a disposal? Is everyone with a single sink and a disposal supposed to only wash stuff in it with cold water?
(though hot water drained from dishwashers is often

So maybe using the same reasoning we should legislate that no household can own more than one automobile?

What does "overwhelm" mean in this sense? Surely there's not enough pressure created by a disposal to burst the drain pipes, is there?

Yeah, but...

Surely you jest now...
Happy Holidays,
Jeff
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Jeffry Wisnia

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whole chickens have been through garbage disposals, garbage disposals are commonly misused

comment below

supposedly, the only thing that cools the garbage disposal motor is the water runing through it
thus, supposedly, the motor will last longer if no hot water is run through it during use

your humor is getting stale ; )

plonk!
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Jeff Wisnia wrote:

Just about any disposal manufacturer will tell you that their disposals will handle all of this just fine, and will have no problem with most bones or chicken carcasses either. If you check with your local solid waste disposal agency (garbage collection company) you will find that they are making efforts to reduce food waste in landfills.
The best thing to do is to save most of your food scraps for a compost bin. In general terms, composting any leftover vegetables, fruits, etc, is easy to do, and can be mixed in with your lawn clippings and leaves in your compost bin. Or you can get a worm bin and compost other things too. Don't cook more meat than you plan to eat, and give the scraps to your dogs or pigs. You can throw away the dried bones, or use them for soup first.
Some things, such as egg shells, should never go into a disposal, because they clog up things at the treatment plants. But most of the things mentioned can go into a disposal with little trouble. It's best to minimize food waste in the first place, and then compost as much as possible of what's left. More progressive cities have a food scrap recycling program too. But if you are going to dispose of those things in another way, check with your local agencies to see what they prefer. If they are like mine, they will tell you to use the disposal over the garbage can for environmental reasons when it comes to some items. They will probably also tell you to save your oils and fats in a jar and where you can take them too. And they will tell you to avoid putting some things in the disposal if at all possible.
A good general rule is to put nothing in the disposal or landfill, but it may not be practical.
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I once had a disposal pump water up the vent pipe and onto the roof of a one story house because of a clogged up drain. I do not see how you could get enough pressure to damage drain pipes when the drains are properly vented.
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It could be done, but your going to complicate the under the sink plumbing a bunch depending on your layout. Biggest deal would be a lot less free room under neath. Why not get a commercial man eater with the 6 inch maw? I have connected 15 hp 3 phase garbage disposals for commercial kitchens. You sure would not need two of them.
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Scott wrote:

Kosher kitchen perhaps?
I'm half way through reading this book, having purchased it when we went to hear the author lecture on it last Sunday night:
(Amazon.com product link shortened)03902639/sr=2-2/ref=pd_ka_b_2_2/103-5199975-0967818
Some of the modifications ultra observant jews do to their kitchens (like installing dual dishwashers)are pretty far out. And, things like microwave ovens and Teflon coated cookware weren't exactly commnplace a few thousand years ago when those rules were first commanded and codified.
There's no fundamental technical reason why you can't install dual disposals, and it shouldn't be very difficult either as long as the drain holes in the two sinks are far apart so that there's clearance for the bodies of the two disposals.
Depending on whether you're using existing wiring, if you get big ballsy disposals, you might not be able to run them both at once without tripping a circuit breaker. But, you could easily add a three way switch to direct the electric power to only one disposal at a time to get around that.
Happy Holidays,
Jeff
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Jeffry Wisnia

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use
Had one once; unnecessary, never again. Keep a used milk carton/container near sink and put 'non meat' leftovers such as peelings, carrot tops, corn husks etc. in it. When full, fold over and stick on a clothes pin to keep closed. Every few days, no matter the weather, toss filled container onto compost heap. Occasionally when outside shake out contents of carton/s onto compost and chuck the now empty waxed paper milk carton into the burning barrel. Every few weeks/months burn contents of barrel including other semi confidential material, not that there re IS anything of interest in MY garbage! Taking note of wind direction and/or washing on neighbours clothes lines! Result; a small amount of ash and excellent garden compost next season! And, provide you do not burn anything toxic and your compost is NOT used for growing edible vegetables the ash can often be added to the much larger quantity of compost. The presence of all those live worms that you found around the garden and have previously put in the compost, crawling and multiplying while they make good earth, will testify that the compost is healthy and suitable for growing shrubs, trees and flowers! I find that one uses two litres (that's approx a quart to the metrically challenged among us) of milk, at about the same rate as usable compost material accumulates. I'm a retired senior and cook for only myself.
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Terry wrote:
<snipped>

<anipped> I take it you include yourself in that challenged group Terry. Last time I looked a litre was 1.06 quarts.
Happy Holidays,
Jeff
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Jeffry Wisnia

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Jeff is correct; since one litre is 2.11 PINTS (not quarts). Then two litres = 4.22 pints which is a bit over two quarts! I stand corrected; for trying to be smart without checking first! :-( Thanks Jeff. Seasonable greetings. Terry.
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Some people live in apartments. Not everybody can have a compost heap.
Don <donwiss at panix.com>.
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Why not? They make window boxes for plants, just covert one to be your own window ledge compost heap. Fresh compost available no matter what floor you live on.
Only $19.95 . . .but wait. there's more . . . . . .
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wrote in message

you
That's right. Your new apartment buddies. The rats with fluffy tails.

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Wire it up on a Edison circuit, with a tied breaker. Has the effect of running them (in series) on 240V, with the added advantage of being able to shut them both off, safer when working on them.
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That sounds dangerous. Is it code?
My disposal is socketed, not hardwired, which is my preference for safety. If I stick with 5-20 sockets, this Edison circuit could concievably put 240v across one of them. If I use 6-20 plugs, someone someday might think it's OK to put 240v across a 120v disposal motor. Either way, not good.
At any rate, responses in this thread have been enlightening.
-Scott
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snipped-for-privacy@xmission.com (Scott) wrote:

Yes it is. Fairly common actually.

The only difference is that only one neutral wire is used, instead of two. You still use the same socket, just break the tie bar between the two hots in the socket.
Using a tied breaker will make it obvious what is going on, as well as safer, with one breaker to shut off both disposals.
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On Fri, 24 Dec 2004 03:02:14 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@xmission.com (Scott) wrote:

I had thought of this. Since I haven't redone my kitchen yet, I mostly have been thinking about which of the two basins would get the disposal. The Basic Sink 19" x 18", 12" deep. Or the Smaller Task Sink 13" x 18", 8" deep. Since I only have one window, and the kitchen isn't all that large, my plan is to put both of these on a 45" sink base as far apart as possible. Then two faucets.
Don <donwiss at panix.com>.
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