Doorbell voltage

I needed to replace my old doorbell chime. I purchased a new, simple chime, that merely said "low voltage" (e.g. wired, not wireless) on the outside of the box. My door bell transformer puts out about 22 volts. (It's probably supposed to be 24). The instructions to the new unit, which has the name "Zenith" (probably under license by the Zenith company to Home Depot) says that it runs on just 16 volts.
The unit has two solenoids, one for the front door, and another that has the second tone blocked for the back door. Would 22 volts be too much for the unit? I'm not going to be replacing the transformer on the breaker box, so my options are to use the unit as is, return the unit for something else or calculate what size resistor to put in series so that the voltage received by the chime is 16 volts.
Does anybody have any experience with door bell voltage? Is it important to have the exact voltage?
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Fred spake thus:

No, don't sweat it. The transformers are never exactly 24 volts, even if that's what's stamped on them. Close enough is close enough. As they say, it ain't rocket science.
Think about it: the doorbell solenoids are only energized for moments at a time (unless some kid leans on your doorbell or something), so they'll handle it just fine.
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replying to David Nebenzahl, Ken wrote:

I just had the fire department out due to the door bell button sticking in and the coils burning. I had 34 volts at the transformer.
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It'll be fine.
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"Fred" < snipped-for-privacy@no.spam> wrote in message news: snipped-for-privacy@no.spam...
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You know that e.g. means "for example", right? If so, I don't understand your sentence. ("i.e. means "that is". For some reason, more than half the population seems to have this backwards. :) )

No. Especially in the case of a doorbell, where people only press the button for a couple seconds.
I wish though that I could remember what the voltages normally are. Everything was fine for me when I had a doorbell like your new one in the front hall, and bell with a clapper in the basement, so I could hear the doorbell when I was in the basement.
Then I saw a really nice doorbell at a very big discount, pretty much like the one in the hall but much nicer. So I put the new one in the hall and the one from the hall in the basement. Great, but now the transformer wasn't big enough to power the two. It was either 12, 14, or 18 volts. I think it was less than 18. I went to the store and bought the only other size they had, which was more than 14, either 18 or 24. Then the first floor hall doorbell was too loud, and every time the mailman rang the bell, the glass and wood breakage detector set off my home burglar alarm! Fortunately I didn't have monitoring, but otoh, it might have taken less than a year to find out about this if I did. It was a year before someone told me about the false alarms.
There is nothing very fragile in your new doorbell and 24 volts isn't enough to melt or overheat the wires, probably even if they leaned on the doorbell for hours, but certainly not in 15 seconds.
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You needed more power, not more voltage. Look for a xformer with a higher mA rating but the same voltage.
-Tim
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On Sun, 24 Sep 2006 23:56:30 -0500, "Tim Fischer"

Thanks. I think either one will do.

I didn't see one, but I did see a higher voltage xformer, so that's what I got. It's been ten years since I did this and everything has worked fine.
I forgot to say before that in order to stop the false alarms, I put a resistor in series with the first floor doorbell. I started with a potentiometer to find the minimum resistance that would keep the glass breakage detector from setting off the burglar alarm. When I found the value I replaced the pot with a cheap fixed resistor.

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wrote:> I forgot to say before that in order to stop the false alarms, I put a

Which, oddly enough, effectively reduces the voltage to that doorbell <g>
-Tim
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wrote:

Probably 16V. That seems to be the standard.

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mm wrote:

Heh. Having spent many years of declining and conjugating and Latin nouns and verbs, how could I forget? Actually e.g. stands for "exempli gratia" which pretty much means something like "for the sake of example." I.e. stands for "id est," which could mean this is or that is. So writing a e.g. was a brain dump on my part. (It happens sometimes, like when I type the wrong homonym and then wonder how I wrote that!) I hope this helps clear up your confusion.

Thanks. I wasn't worried about a few seconds, but I may be worried if the button sticks and the coil is energized for days while we're away. Anyway I wired it up, and the solenoid doesn't seem to work too well. If I press and release the button very quickly it sounds ok, but otherwise it the striker seems to get stuck or not hit the chime very hard.
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I have a similar doorbell. The transformer is marked 16V, but actually puts out 19.7V with no load. This is normal for low-voltage transformers. A Load will bring the voltage down.
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24 vrms = 34 v p-p.
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Pico Rico wrote:

Hi, Regardless of voltage, if there is dead short it'll smoke/burn as a matter of time.
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On Fri, 19 Sep 2014 11:53:55 -0700, "Pico Rico"

And 34 volts open circuit could well be 22 under load - depending on the resistance of the windings.
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wrote:

Most now, by code, are "impedence protected" meaning they will not burn out (up) under overload.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Hi, Also there ought to be a fuse. Wondering what kinda meter is reading p-p voltage?
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wrote:

Never seen a doorbell with the secondary fused.. Shorting the secondary won't blow the 15 amp fuse or breaker on the primary.
I'm sure it was not a p-p reading - it was just an open circuit voltage on an impedence protected transformer. The resistance is high enough to limit the maximum current, and to more or less regulate the voltage to 24 with the design load applied.
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