doorbell - is LED avail

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Our doorbell is the standard one with the small rectangular "illuminated" button, that is screwed to the door frame. Every so often, usually just prior to Halloween :) I go out and replace the button - as the tiny bulb has burned out.
Wonder if there are any LED style replacements ? I had seen some comments on an electronics forum about how you might contruct one - but was curious if any retail versions existed ?
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*They are available, but I would avoid them. I have received at least two phone calls about problems with them and someone posted on here months ago with a similar issue. Evidently some door bells require that a diode be added to the circuit. The button instructions even mention the diode, but none are offered as an accessory to buy. Stick with neon.
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Neon ?
I've modified buttons putting LEDs in. So far the new ones fail because the plastics breaks apart cheap junk. Need to find some better buttons. It might take a bit of talent to find a small led and figure out what size resistor to use, and cram everything in there. These plastic models I used had sun uv damage. Obviously need transparent buttons or housings. I don't even remember what voltage, 24 vac ? I'll do the math later.
Greg
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On 04/23/13 07:48 pm, John Grabowski wrote:

AFAIR, the lowest voltage on which neon lamps will work is 70 or thereabouts. Door bells typically operate on a far lower voltage.
Perce
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.

He said LED, not neon!!!!
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On 4/23/2013 8:18 PM, snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net wrote:

(snipped)

I think that he was referring to what John said.
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at

on.

rather than light the button why not light the area around the button area? say build it so it lights the lock too.....
use the power of the bell circuit, and diodes are cheap, under a buck or two and available at radio shack.
one of my favorite purchases is a touch pad door lock, push any button turns the lights for the buttons, push my choosen code and the door unlocks. It has a key too, although I havent used it in over a year.
Best 100 buck purchase in years, no fumbling for keys:
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Your using way too much common sense.
I never thought of using a side light, but since I have problems, might give it a try. You can put a diode in series with an led to limit dissipation. A value of 1 k to 5k ohms is also needed in series, but needs to be pretty big as it gets hot. I got long led strip, and each led has it's own resistor, but very small in physical size. I want to check temperatures. It designed for 12 volts dc. One led at 5-10 ma is plenty bright.
I need to get a touch lock.
Greg
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How long do the batteries last? Are the batteries changed from the inside or from the outside?
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her

itting

my keypad lock has battery life over a year, which is fine. the batterys arent charged.
if the electronics fail for any reason the key still works in manual mode..
I had some work being done here, I asked the contractor what PIN he wanted and deleted it when he was done:)
the best 100 bucks I ever spent:) At night pushing a button brings up all the buttons lights:) for easy button pushing:)
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wrote:

I put a similar setup on my front and side doors a couple years ago. Like you, haven't used a key since - stopped even carrying one as I have hidden ones for emergencies. Wish I'd added these 30 years ago. Now that I'm practiced I can open the lock faster then using the key.
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On 4/27/2013 2:03 PM, Ashton Crusher wrote:

I think there's one out that has a thumb print reader? I want the one with the robot eye on a stalk that pops out of the door to look me over then scan my irises or retinas. I seem to remember a movie "Gattaca" where the access control to office buildings required a blood sample to verify your DNA. The line of workers coming into a building stuck their index fingers in a gizmo that popped a needle into the finger to get a blood sample. Ouch! ^_^
TDD
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n

y

im/her

y sitting

ME TOO, the fast entry is really nice in rain:( freezing weather:( and when you just HAVE to go to the bathroom:(
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Is there a limit to the length of the PIN? If there is, what is the limit? Is there a limit to the number of active PIN numbers that you can have at one time?
Does the keypad have letters on or near the numbers like a telephone keypad? (I find it easier to remember a word than to remember a number.)
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On 04/23/13 09:29 pm, IGot2P wrote:

Precisely.
Perce
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On 4/23/2013 7:55 PM, Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

The standard NE-2 neon lamp takes at least 90 volts to fire and most doorbells operate on 16 volts AC. The standard lighted doorbell button has a simple low voltage incandescent lamp parallel to the switch contacts and it lights due to the small current flowing through it and the solenoid coil of the doorbell as long as the button is not pressed. When the button is pushed, the full current goes to the doorbell making it ring. ^_^
TDD
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90 volts dc. 63 vac will fire the lamp. Temperature and external light probably affect voltages. Trouble with most indicators, including led, they try to get too much brightness, shortening life.
Greg
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wrote:

Um, 63VAC has ~90V peaks. He was right, NE-2s "take at least 90 volts to fire". Yes, you are also right, in that it is temperature and (interestingly) external light dependant. The problem is that to save a fraction of a cent, they're built like crap. I've never had a bulb fail before the switch, though. I just had one go after less than a year (plastic button broke, exposing the bulb).
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*Thanks TDD. I keep thinking those small bulbs in the buttons are neon.
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at

on.

cts

oid

ton

.
neon bulbs even in continious service last nearly forever....
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