Doorbell always uses electricity!

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E Z Peaces wrote:

I don't understand why this is a problem.

Or rechargeables. The precharged NiMH ones seem to hold their charge for a long time.
Ours just emits a strangled sort of buzz; replacing it with a cheap wireless one would be a definite advantage if it weren't for the fact that our friends all know to knock -- anybody who rings the "bell" only wants to convert us to something or sell us something.
--
Cheers,
Bev
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Make your own batteries? As mentioned before; in the 1950s I found the remnants of of some original LeClanche cells. Leclanche cells were renewable. A glass jar with a carbon stick positive anode that never wore out, immersed in a strong solution of alkali (called Sal-ammoniac) and a zinc plate negative. Wires were attached to the carbon and zinc. When the zinc wore away and/or the Sal-ammoniac dried out spares could be purchased at a local hardware/iron-mongers store. With todays low power solid state (transistor) devices perhaps we could make our own batteries out of sea water, vinegar or household bleach and scrap iron???????? Now if I could only make one (several) big enough to run those 'dud battery' cordless drills I have lying around!!!!!! :-)
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well I suppose you could use a battery to power the normal doorbell button with no light and trip a solid state relay, that would power the transformer just to ring bell.
taken futher a solar panel could keep the battery charged.
or heck go solar completely with LED lights you might be able to have the button light up:)
probably cost a few hundred bucks, to save a dollar or two a year.
put the solar panel somewhere it cant be stolen. they can be costly.
someone has too much time on their hands:(
cut out a decent candy bar a day, at a buck each and save 300 to 400 bucks a year
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on 11/20/2008 8:03 AM terry said the following:

How about the electrodes being stuck in a potato? :-)
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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On Wed, 19 Nov 2008 20:51:58 -0600, Vic Smith

Why not just a plain-old fashioned door knocker? No batteries, works well, very reliable, even works if the power is off, and it's *green* (especially if made from cheap brass imported from China!)
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the cheao chinese brass was a big polluter in china ands added to world pollution
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With any luck, he'll also remember the computer, the hair dryer, the pump in the fish tank, and all the other big power drains.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

Don't forget the clock on the microwave.
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Cheers,
Bev
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wrote:

Gotta dig back in my 60's damaged memory synapses but the AC wires in the walls generate an electromagnetic field. Metal that passes through these fields gets induced voltage. So, if you have any metal in what you wear or carry in your pocket you're sucking "some" level of power. Maybe can save another .04 a year by instituting a buck naked policy indoors. Huh?
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Red Green wrote:

Depending on the climate zone you're in (I keep my house at ~55F in the winter, and treatment for hypothermia will eat up your savings). In the right climate, a buck naked policy could be well worth it in entertainment value alone.
Dave
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On Wed, 19 Nov 2008 18:44:47 -0800 (PST), Mikepier

Go "Amish"
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My first thought when reading this was "ok...so we'd save a few pennies a month". But I investigated and found a rather interesting read related to your theory where the author actually tested the doorbell transformer using a Kill-A-Watt:
http://www.newenglandbreeze.com/nl/TEM20080901.html
Luckily my doorbell isn't lighted, so it's probably not worth my time and effort to change.
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wrote:

Great... I'll eat the three bucks a year and take the beating for being an environmental criminal.
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wrote:

The KillA Watt does not compensate for the terrible power factor of an idle transformer - It will be indicating significantly higher than the actual power disipation of the transformer. The incandescent lamp in the lighted doorbel button is likely 80% of the real draw.
Put a power factor correction capacitor across the transformer primary and I'll bet the KillAWatt reads less than 1 watt.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

The 4400, which I think is their base model, is supposed to show volts, amps, volt-amps, power factor, watts, Hertz, kilowatt hours, and hours. Accuracy is advertised at 0.2%.
Almost all customers love it. I was about to buy one until I read a review by someone who claims to have bought several for an R&D lab.
He found them inaccurate when new, and they were likely to freeze when current exceeded 7 amps. This made them useless for anything with a starting surge that high.
All failed between 30 and 50 hours, giving wild readings or none at all.
I believe him because his description is good. It reminds me of problems I've had with DMMs that can measure up to 10 amps. If you run several amps through a resistor with little mass, I suppose sudden temperature changes can lead to microscopic cracks, which affect accuracy and cause increasingly fast deterioration. I imagine Kill-a-watt's manufacturer could solve the problem with R&D.
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On Thu, 20 Nov 2008 17:14:47 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:
[snip]

Can you get doorbell buttons with LEDs?
[snip]
--
34 days until the winter solstice celebration

Mark Lloyd
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The incandescent lamp probably consumes about 1/4 watt maybe less, while the idling transformer consumes a couple watts.
I still do delivery work and I have done so for many years, and I have only seen one transformer-powered doorbell button with an LED. The LED was a model with efficiency similar to or less than even the models of incandescents lamps being used in doorbell buttons, as used in doorbell buttons, with intended life expectancy of decades. The LED appears to me to be from the 1970's or possibly early 1980's.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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wrote:

My first thought when reading this was "ok...so we'd save a few pennies a month". But I investigated and found a rather interesting read related to your theory where the author actually tested the doorbell transformer using a Kill-A-Watt:
http://www.newenglandbreeze.com/nl/TEM20080901.html
Luckily my doorbell isn't lighted, so it's probably not worth my time and effort to change.
============================================ $3.15/year. Pretty good deal.
Olddog
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Seerialmom wrote:

yeah, the article stated 3 lousy watts for a *lighted* doorbell. I doubt that an unlighted doorbell switch even draws a watt. It's a transformer but it has *no* load on it at all except for the brief moment it's pushed. Much ado about Nothing.
One watt for a year would be about a dollar a year. The payback on all the OP's effort will take a Long time. <g>
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Leroy wrote:

But a transformer with no load consumes power which is largely given off as heat. You can observe this by feeling the transformer. Such loads collectively add up to a lot of waste. If you have purchased any devices that use external power supplies (cell phone charger, router in recent times you will notice that that they no longer use transformers and come with much more efficient switching power supplies. When it comes to power waste slow and steady wins the race.

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