Door swing question

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I watch TV programs like Miami, Dade County SWAT.
Lots and lots and lots of front doors on people's houses swing OUT. I know that sometimes they can flip the editing, and things get reversed, but that would be impossible for front doors. I guess it's so people can't kick them in so easily, but then, they get pulled off a lot easier.
Anyone know about this practice? They sure look funny, and wouldn't be the best way to mount a door. Bang someone in the forehead, or knock them off the stoop, or get it wet when it's raining.
Steve
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On Fri, 18 Feb 2011 08:39:58 -0800, "Steve B"

It is a hurricane strategy. The wind is less likely to blow them open and the harder it blows, the tighter they seal against driven rain.
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On 2/18/2011 11:48 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

front and rear doors opening out. My reason ... the back opens into a screened porch and can be left open and not be in anyone's way. On the front door, it just made sense from how it looked, however, it could have been either way. One problem is that you have to use non-removable hinge pins or something similar to avoid break-ins, or should I say, "remove pin -ins". Also, we have no hurricanes here.
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Steve B wrote:

    How would you install a storm door on a door that opened out?
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With conflicting results?
Steve ;-)
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On 2/18/2011 11:17 AM, Ken wrote:

you put the storm door on the inside. LOL! Well it wouldn't be any more ridiculous than having the regular door swing OUT! LMAO!!
--
Steve Barker
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Most doors around me have additional storm doors, so they HAVE to swing in.
greg
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In commercial situations doors swing out. It's a safety thing. In the early 1900's there was some incidents where entire crowds were killed. If you have 60 people running from a fire they will push up against the door and prevent it from opening inward in their panic.
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On Fri, 18 Feb 2011 09:38:44 -0800 (PST), jamesgangnc

Actually there have bee incidents in this century. The "Great White" night club fire in 2003 had people trapped behind an in swing door.
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wrote:

In commercial situations doors swing out. It's a safety thing. In the early 1900's there was some incidents where entire crowds were killed. If you have 60 people running from a fire they will push up against the door and prevent it from opening inward in their panic. -------------------------------------------------------------------
You might be thinking of
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cocoanut_Grove_fire
which had a single revolving door and other doors that opened inward against the mass of people
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triangle_Shirtwaist_Factory_fire
where exit doors were bolted to prevent workers from sneaking out
But I suspect it's the Iroquois Theatre fire that you're thinking about. It resulted in significant changes to fire and building codes worldwide, among them the "panic bar."
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iroquois_Theatre_fire
The ITF killed 605 or more in 1903, making it the most deadly one building fire in American history. Deaths there were mostly caused by iron gates, meant to keep people from swarming the stage, at the bottom of the staircases. Generally, the place was a firetrap and inspectors, who had noted the deficiencies, were told not to anger the powerful syndicate that built the theater. Allegations of bribes were also made (it was Chicago - what else is new?).
Some perished while trapped in dead ends or while attempting to open "doors" that were in reality windows designed to look like doors. The Iroquois doors used bascule locks that were not familar to theater patrons and thus hard to open in the dark What's a bascule lock?
http://schlagelocks.wordpress.com/2009/03/04/the-extinction-of-the-bascule-lock /
-- Bobby G.
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wrote:

http://schlagelocks.wordpress.com/2009/03/04/the-extinction-of-the-bascule-lock /
If I ever have sixty people in my house, I would probably run out screaming. For the other times, I just have never ever really seen an out swinging door, except as in some of the special circumstances noted. I just thought that the proper install was IN.
Steve
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Robert, thank you for an intelligent and concise answer. This has become so extremely rare on usenet. It is the type answer that made usenet possible and popular.
It is tragic to see the depths to which it has come with politics and name calling. I miss the usenet we once had.
--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
DanG
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Still, you gotta wonder why people would want to literally push someone off their stoop so they could come inside. And have the door open outwards and get rained on. You knock on the door, then have to jump back or step backwards off the stoop because a door is coming at your face. Doesn't make any sense to me. Just thought we might have some LEOs or druggies who might chime in with their take on the question.
For commercial buildings, it is just plain common sense, although it did take a few disasters for everyone to get on the same page.
And I agree about your Usenet comments. But this is just like the real world, rude people and all.
Steve
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That's no different than an in-swing door with a storm door. People on both sides still have to step back.
People are pretty good about not getting hit in the face with a door, and other people are pretty good at not hitting other people in the face with a door. Usually happens once and then they learn. It's a vertical learning curve.
R
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I understand that an outward opening door would not be a problem to people who lived there, or who were knowledgeable about how the door worked. For everyone else, people with groceries in their hands, new visitors, small children who don't understand to get back, and people who might have to step back and DOWN a step or five on the stoop just to swing the door open so they could get in, an outward opening door is something that I can not understand being installed in that configuration. That makes as much sense as putting an INWARD opening door in a tiny closet so that you could not open the door once you threw anything in there, nave no floor storage space, couldn't open the door if anything fell off a shelf and blocked the door, nor have access to any shelf behind the door. To me, an outward opening door looks like it belongs on a crack house. They are just not "common", and makes as much sense as installing shingles from the top down, leaving the shingles to collect instead of repel water.
Steve
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He seems dead set against it, so let's give him two votes against. That should make him feel better. ;)
R
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If you ever _had_ a house with an out opener, you would never again want one opening in...assuming you don't have a little bitty stoop outside it. Why? Because it saves an amazing amount of space inside.
As for the 'stepping back' bit. Why is it any different than when you want to go out of an in-swing one? The arguments _against_ an out- opener are mostly nonsense. The one about 'easier to pull it off' is really nonsensical. True I suppose if you hook a car or something to it but the average burglar isn't going to be doint that. He for sure is not going to be able to kick-in an outopener.
Harry K
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On Sat, 19 Feb 2011 20:51:45 -0800 (PST), Harry K

Never had an out opener. And never noticed the in openers taking an amazing amount of space. They open into an "entryway" in every house I've lived in. While the door is open it covers a part of the wall. Big deal. I don't put a TV there anyway. Biggest difference is "space" I would see is we'd store our boots/shoes 32" closer to the door. Might make a difference in a real tiny house or a mobile home.
--Vic
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On 2/19/2011 11:30 AM, DanG wrote:

I'll note that in my last house I changed the sealed building plans to have the rear/kitchen door swing out instead of in so it didn't hit you in the butt if you were cooking, (it was a little tight). The inspector saw it and said it was a problem, I needed 2 doors that open inward. I then showed him the bedroom that was modified to be my home office... complete with a door that opened inward. He said OK, no problem. (front door also opened inward)
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I'm wondering if the inspector was addressing issues other than solely the direction of the door swing.
I couldn't find anything for Pennsylvania online that prohibited an out-swinging door. Mainly checked the PA Uniform Construction Code.
And the IRC addresses out swing doors, providing conditions for them, so they are allowed.
From the 2006 IRC. - R311.4.3 Landings at doors. There shall be a floor or landing on each side of each exterior door. The floor or landing at the exterior door shall not be more than 1.5 inches (38 mm) lower than the top of the threshold. The landing shall be permitted to have a slope not to exceed 0.25 unit vertical in 12 units horizontal (2-percent). - - Exceptions: - - - 1. Where a stairway of two or fewer risers is located on the exterior side of a door, other than the required exit door, a landing is not required for the exterior side of the door provided the door, other than an exterior storm or screen door does not swing over the stairway. - - - 2. The exterior landing at an exterior doorway shall not be more than 73/4 inches (196 mm) below the top of the threshold, provided the door, other than an exterior storm or screen door does not swing over the landing.
R
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