Door stops

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Stormin Mormon wrote:

Probably a little spendy for a small church, but at work some of the fire doors have magnetic hold-backs. Alarm trips, the magnets let go, and the doors fall closed. They also have similar mechanical hold-backs that drop over the top of the open door, but when alarm system trips the solenoid (like big electric doorbell dinger), the arm lifts and the doors fall closed. The technology is definitely out there, your fire alarm company can point you to it. And they will know what is code and insurance legal. Of course, all that takes money, and if you are like most churches, the building fund pot is always close to empty.
-- aem sends...
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wrote:

They could save money by using magnets and when the alarm trips, the siren sounds and the ushers go shut the doors. :)
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My old middle school used to have those magnetic hold opens. Like you say, when the fire alarm went off, the hold opens released. The church has been, over the years, cutting way back on the paid maintenance staff hours, so I'd have to guess that the magnetic hold opens aren't going to happen. Plus, they need power to run the magnet.
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Sounds right. They're fire doors and suppose to be closed.

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Stormin Mormon wrote:

Carpet?
I made a special door stop for an elderly friend when they had a problem with robberies at her retirement home. It was a wood wedge with a vertical handle so she could place it without bending. It also had several finishing nails pounded into the bottom so the heads stuck out 1/4", so it would bite into the carpet and not slide.
A shallow angle and "sticky" bottom will both increase the hold on most surfaces. The top surface would idealy be hard and slippery to increase downward pressure and decrease sliding.
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On Tue, 6 Oct 2009 19:54:52 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

Seems like the metal door stops that flip up and clip against the door are the most practical. A gallon plastic jug filled with (holy) water is another practical solution. You will want to keep people from tripping over such an object.
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On Tue, 6 Oct 2009 19:54:52 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

There's nothing in the door closer that will keep it open?
How about a 1 or 2 foot piece of 2x4 where the hinges are?

What if you kick the tall end towards the door. Or maybe put your foot against the tall end and force the door into the stopper, but that's not as good.

Probalby not. Make a couple and see. You probably have to kick them into place to make them stick.
I agree; Sandpaper will sand the floor. Worse than scratching the bottom edge of a door, which can be touched up if necessary with stain or Old English furniture polish/stain.
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There's nothing in the door closer that will keep it open?
SM: I havn't seen it, if there is.
How about a 1 or 2 foot piece of 2x4 where the hinges are?
SM: I'd like to avoid anything at the hinge end. Don't want all the leverage of the wide door concentrated on the smaller hinge end. Not only the door closer pulling on the hinges, but someone sure to walk by and bump the door. That's a lot of leverage, pressing on a very small place.

What if you kick the tall end towards the door. Or maybe put your foot against the tall end and force the door into the stopper, but that's not as good.
SM: I've tried assortment of techniques. A couple days ago, I tried to wedge the kitchen door. The gap to the floor is maybe 3/8 inch. I tried every this or that with a door stop, including turning the door stop upside down. Finally went and got another door stop that was a bit more grippy.

Probalby not. Make a couple and see. You probably have to kick them into place to make them stick.
SM: The construction place near me had some cut scrap out, the other day. Some of the pieces were triangle. We'll try thm.
I agree; Sandpaper will sand the floor. Worse than scratching the bottom edge of a door, which can be touched up if necessary with stain or Old English furniture polish/stain.
SM: Need something grippy, but not sandy.
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On Wed, 7 Oct 2009 07:19:21 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

For that small a gap, how about a magazine or thin piece of carpet, or vinyl linoleum, or something that bends but has some stiffness, folded over but not creased, so the flat area where the two pieces meet will go under the door, but when the door gets to the rounded area where it is bent bends over, the door won't go any farther.
For the magazine, you'd open it at the middle and fold the front half behind the back half, so the part away from the spine or staples is flat, but the part near the staples is taller and round.
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A couple days later, I was scavenging some cut wood scraps for the single adults campfire and marshmallow roast. The construction place near me had some scraps I got for the fire. They also had some various triangle pieces, which I took to the church. Aparently, they work well enough, as door stops. Assortment of sizes and angles, so one's bound to work here or there.
Great ideas, all who wrote. Thank you, to all.
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

Bricks. Or concrete blocks if the doors are really big :)
PS - the church ladies could crochet pretty covers for the bricks :)
--

dadiOH
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"dadiOH" wrote

There ya go. It was my first thought and figured someone would suggest it.
Stormin, to expand on that a brick may not be heavy enough (you'd have to judge that but I suspect it won't be enough). You know those smaller 'half cinderblocks' (one hole, not 2). That's perfect. Tall enough they do not pose a trip hazard and heavy enough. To protect the doors finish, and floors, put a rubber matting on the bottom (there are silicone caulks that will hold it) then have one of the ladies who sews, make a little top cover (open at the bottom). One strip around it with a seam, and a square sewn to the top. Drop over cinderblock. Now, it even looks pretty.
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Change the door closers to a model that has a lock to hold them open, this type has been around for decades, I just don't know what the trade name is for them.
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wrote:

I guess what he was saying is that since these are fire doors, they're not allowed to have those.
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on 10/6/2009 7:54 PM (ET) Stormin Mormon wrote the following:

Try these door stops that stay on the door so you don't have to search for your home-made wedges when you want to hold the door open. http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=productList&NB94961544&NeB94967294&Ntk=i_products&Ntt=door+stop or: http://preview.tinyurl.com/yck5ktp
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Bill
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