Door Locks

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Not sure you want colloidal, wiki defining it as, "colloidal graphite (a permanent suspension in a liquid)". I can see where the "liquid" may become a problem. I got a graphite pwdr in an evaporating liquid suspension for my door locks on my Toyota p/u, where temps get 20-30 deg below zero F. Don't want no liquid turning to ice. Squirt it in, carrier evaporates, jes graphite pwdr remains. I used it 2 yrs ago and haven't needed a reapplication, yet. Yer local NAPA auto parts store has it.
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I despise that product. Dries out, gets gummy, then it's hard to unlock or lock the lock.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .

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On Sun, 4 Mar 2012 17:44:20 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"

excellent results.
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hydrocarbon carrier that evaporates after distributing the graphite and disolving old oily lubricants in the lock. I was first exposed to the stuff in dealing with sticky TOYOTA locks by a local locksmith while I was service manager at a TOYOTA dealership. He claimed it was the only effective method he had come across that did not require removal and dissassembly of the lock.
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On 3/4/2012 2:22 PM, Dottie wrote:

Dottie, several questions.
Trouble with the key or trouble with the knob?
If it is the key: If you would be comfortable taking the lock out, I would spray plenty of WD40 or similar to wash the keyway and pins trying to get as much dirt and crud out as possible. If you have an air duster, I would blow out as much of the dirt and WD40 as possible. Give the keyway a few quick puffs of graphite. If this doesn't fix it, it is time for a fresh lock or a repin at a lock shop.
If it is the knob: Again, you need to take the lock out of the door. Look over the parts that turn. It may have a build up of old grease caked up with dirt and actually hard. Wipe everything off clean. Apply a light coat of grease on all the moving parts. Vaseline if you don't have grease.
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On 3/4/2012 3:22 PM, Dottie wrote:

If this is a deadbolt type lock, try locking and unlocking with the door open. Sometimes deadbolts bind against the striker plate.
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Yes, I was going to suggest that she check the *door*. It could be sagging or out of alignment. Trying to unlock the lock with the door wide open should help determine whether the door is actually responsible.
-- Steven L.
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On Sun, 4 Mar 2012 23:05:21 +0000, "Steven L."

relatively certain it IS a lock problem - not a door problem.
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I also like silicone spray. Sounds like you're not mechanically minded. Do you have a friend or relative who might help out?
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
My door lock has become difficult to unlock. Don't know why -- I sprayed it with WD-40 and it seemed to help but then a few days later it started again. I don't want to have to change the lock if I can help it. Anybody know what to do? Thanks.
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wrote:

I agree mostly with others except it's okay to use WD-40 on common door locks. Heck I've seen at least 2 locksmiths use it. Yes, it can leave a film that can collect dirt but I've used it over and over on a lot of common door locks without a problem ever. Now whether there is anything better, dunno.
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On 3/4/2012 6:14 PM, Doug wrote:

WD-40 has become a brand name and there are now multiple formulations, some are suitable for lock lubrication.
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Jerrod, it's about time someone injected some common sense into this thread.
So many posters never bother to check the links, but just go one repeating what they have known for years and have not kept up with what is happening. If they had checked the link way back at the beginning of this thread they would have seen a different WD-40 than what they have been referencing.
To really catch up one might go to http://www.wd40specialist.com/ and see what they have been missing.
Charlie
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On 3/4/2012 2:22 PM, Dottie wrote:

At one time I installed and serviced automatic doors and commercial store fronts. I've also repaired a lot of interior doors and locks of all kinds. The one lubricant I've found that works for everything on the type of things that need lubrication on doors is industrial chain lube. It contains molybdenum disulphide along with a thick oil that stays put resisting moisture but will also penetrate into tight clearances. I've use it on all sorts of locks and mechanisms without a problem and it lasts a very long time.
http://preview.tinyurl.com/88hwm83
http://preview.tinyurl.com/7xftcr8
TDD
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Should be OK on hinges, but I'd never spray such into a keyhole, or latch bolt.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
At one time I installed and serviced automatic doors and commercial store fronts. I've also repaired a lot of interior doors and locks of all kinds. The one lubricant I've found that works for everything on the type of things that need lubrication on doors is industrial chain lube. It contains molybdenum disulphide along with a thick oil that stays put resisting moisture but will also penetrate into tight clearances. I've use it on all sorts of locks and mechanisms without a problem and it lasts a very long time.
http://preview.tinyurl.com/88hwm83
http://preview.tinyurl.com/7xftcr8
TDD
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On 3/4/2012 8:17 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

By golly it works and keeps on working especially on commercial outside doors that get pounded by rain from time to time. It's especially good for the lock mechanism inside hollow aluminum doors in store fronts. ^_^
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Moly is good stuff. I've got a can of chain lube that I bought, many years ago. I havn't ever tried it on locks. Maybe the new formulation is better. The stuff I got was black, and sticky. I see you wrote "along with a thick oil".
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On 3/5/2012 6:34 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

You know that a lube for chains must be able to get into the tight spots in the rollers. It doesn't take more than a tiny amount of the stuff sprayed on the key and run in and out of the lock multiple times to get enough into the lock itself. I wipe the key off and run it in and out several times again. If the lock is real sticky, I may spray a "tiny" amount into the lock. On hollow aluminum doors, there is usually a spring loaded pin for the top pivot and I'll remove the door so I can properly lube the top and bottom pivots and vertical locking rods if the door has any. You can always pick up a can for around $5.00 at most auto parts stores or industrial supply houses. Try it yourself and let me know how it works for you.
TDD
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Won't know for a while. Might be able to find my can of spray, that's burried behind clutter. Might buy a newer spray can, some day. Won't know for a while. I'd have to find a lock to spray, and then check it in a few days or weeks.
I could imagine using the stuff on hinge pins (not anything people touch, and could tolerate some sluggish lube). Locks, well, still unconvinced.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
You know that a lube for chains must be able to get into the tight spots in the rollers. It doesn't take more than a tiny amount of the stuff sprayed on the key and run in and out of the lock multiple times to get enough into the lock itself. I wipe the key off and run it in and out several times again. If the lock is real sticky, I may spray a "tiny" amount into the lock. On hollow aluminum doors, there is usually a spring loaded pin for the top pivot and I'll remove the door so I can properly lube the top and bottom pivots and vertical locking rods if the door has any. You can always pick up a can for around $5.00 at most auto parts stores or industrial supply houses. Try it yourself and let me know how it works for you.
TDD
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(Amazon.com product link shortened)
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New keyway? Reversed, left to right, of the KW1 keyway I know and love.
Are you totally sure Dottie has a key in knob lock with the new standard door prep? And do you know how many relatives, cleaners, etc, have keys? Is she in apartment building which is master keyed? Or, the sticky lock may be a deadbolt?
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Change the lock. $14 &10 minutes.
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