Door Locks

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My door lock has become difficult to unlock. Don't know why -- I sprayed it with WD-40 and it seemed to help but then a few days later it started again. I don't want to have to change the lock if I can help it. Anybody know what to do? Thanks.
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Dottie,
I don't ever use WD-40 on locks. The residue is greasy and attracts too much dirt and gunk. I always use the silicone sprays for locks and hinges. It goes on wet but dries leaving a very slippery film.
Good Luck, Steve
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Bullshit as usual!
I use WD-40 in all my locks.
http://www.wd40specialist.com/products/silicone-lubricant /
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Many of our local door companies do not recommend WD40 because of the very reason as stated by Steve
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We ain't talkin bout your grampa's WD-40 here, there are 5 new formulations of WD-40.
The WD-40 SPECIALIST WATER RESISTANT SILICONE LUBRICANT looks like a good choice for locks.
WD-40 SPECIALIST WATER RESISTANT SILICONE LUBRICANT safely lubricates, waterproofs and protects metal and non-metal surfaces, including rubber, plastic and vinyl better than leading competitors. It dries fast and leaves a clear, non-staining film that doesnt stick or make a mess, so it wont attract dirt. Effective in a temperature range from from -100F to 500F, it's ideal for use on cables, pulleys, guide rails, valves, linkages, hinges, locks and more, and is 50-state VOC compliant.
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Damn, I'll have to let Gramps know about those. But when you're calling bullshit, perhaps it would be wise to elaborate about the WD40 "Specialist" blends instead of the regular WD40 which is most commonly used and fits the bad description many indicated. BTW, they went with "Specialist" blend because even they knew the regular the blend didn't live up to the task.
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On 3/4/2012 7:38 PM, Detective Sergeant Joe Friday wrote:

Really? The OP said they used "wd-40". And not some "specialist" product (lets put actual stuff that has been around forever in a can and call it "wd-40 specialist"). I would say the "specialist" line is them finally admitting how worthless their "use this on everything" wd-40 is.

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Steve said to use wd40 . Does anybody read the above link ???
Any lube should be a temporary fix. If it does not work, replace. I usually would use CRC 2-26 .
Greg
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Detective Sergeant Joe Friday wrote:

No, you are using WD-40 SPECIALIST, not WD-40. They are two different things and have two different purposes.
--

dadiOH
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If you asked me what kind of vehicle I drive, an accurate answer would be Toyota.
I could also say Toyota Tundra.
Or I could say Toyota Tundra 4x4.
They would all be accurate answers.
Get it?
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If we plan to venture through a safari and I asked what type of vehicle you had, simply answering "Toyota" wouldn't work. You see, a Toyota Camry wouldn't handle the rough terrain of a safari but your Tundra most likely would. Obviously, the point is clear. The "specific" product is for the "specific" task.
Get it?
You make a bad detective, Joe.
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Detective Sergeant Joe Friday wrote:

Of course I get it. You didn't.
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dadiOH
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Oh stop crying. You made an assumption, your assumption was wrong.
It happens. Get over it.
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On Sun, 04 Mar 2012 14:26:55 -0800, bob haller wrote:

The bit that always worried me is that the makers of wd40 claimed it to be a lubricant on their own website, despite evidence that it wasn't (at least not long-term). It's awful stuff, about the only thing it's good for is emergency use (e.g. it's handy in the toolkit in the car) where you know you can take things apart and do the job properly soon after.
I've just been fixing an old typewriter which certainly smells like it was drowned in wd40 at some point; half of that was gummed up and needed stripping, cleaning and oiling to get it working again.
(I agree with Steve, I use a silicone spray for locks - last thing I want is to stick an oily key back in my pocket!)
cheers
Jules
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Can you tell us more about the lock? Does it take more force to turn the key that it used to? What kind of lock is it? Double bolt, doorknob lock, etc. Is this an original key or a lubricant? Is this a new lock or an old one? When my front door lock gets "hinky" it's usually because the bolt and striker start to bind. The house is old and settling and the alignment between the door and frame has drifted.
Steve's right about WD-40. It may give some temporary relief but it's likely to just add to the problem in the long run. I'd still be looking for friction sources. A bad duplicate (and even good ones) can wear down enough through use to become "sticky." I alway try to preserve the original key on a keyring of originals I keep in the FireKing and use only duplicates for daily use. That way, if a key gets lost, it's a dupe and I can have a new dupe cut from the original master key. If you have another copy of the key that's not in daily use, compare the two to see if there's been any serious wear (or if the dupe wasn't cut well to begin with - a very common problem).
-- Bobby G.
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WD-40 is a solvent rather than a lubricant, thus fairly good at dissolving or washing off random gunge that clogs lock mechanisms (e.g. from tobacco smoke). The Pella Windows company recommends it for window mechanisms (to remove atmospheric gunge.)
As RG listed, sticking locks can have various causes (from damage to wards to a doorframe's shifting) so a persistent one should be diagnosed specifically.
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
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Too bad it's worthless for displacing Mormon trolls.
nb
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...or NutjoB morons.
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I must disagree. In sufficient quantity surely it would be as effective as water.
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Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar.org
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wrote:

Get some "lock eze" - it is made specifically for locks and contains colloidal graphite. WD 40 and locks are NOT a good combination.
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