Door framing question

I am gutting my house and need to frame a few new doors and remove a few doors.
In close examination, the way the existing doors are framed is very different from what I have seen typically done. Here is a picture of the door frames of two adjacent doors.
http://i173.photobucket.com/albums/w67/143house/P1010217.jpg
The right side is the rough frame of the door, looks typical.
On the left side I removed the piece of wood that is vertical. Normally those are just 1x6 nailed onto the 2x4 stud right? I pryed out one piece and was surprised it is a piece of 2x6 routed on both sides to form a "T" section. So the wider part is on the outside and the drywall stops short of it.
The house is 35 years old, I wonder why it was done this way, and whether there is any advantage of doing it this way. If I have to frame new doors should I use this method to be consistent?
Thanks,
MC
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I am sorry I forgot to include a picture of what the piece look like. Here it is:
http://i173.photobucket.com/albums/w67/143house/P1010221.jpg
MC
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All the doors were roughed in like that? It would provide a better nailer for the trim around the door than drywall does, but I don't think it is a big deal. I haven't seen anything like that before either. That isn't a stock trim profile you can get from any lumberyard I have seen, so the GC or lead carpenter put some hours into creating those.
aem sends...
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Yes they are all rough in like that. It's just that I am taking down 7 doors and building 4 new doors, so I have those pieces left over to use if I pull out all the nails in it. Just wondering if there is any advantage of reusing those profiles.
MC
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Hey, if they are clean, dry, straight, and non-rotted, any piece of wood you can reuse, is a piece you don't have to buy. Old wood like that will be harder to nail into, but you can be pretty sure it isn't gonna warp any more, or change size. 45-year old framing lumber will be like trim grade today. In this 1960 house, to block a hole where a wall furnace came out (long story), I had to drill freaking pilot holes in the studs to install the blocking for the drywall patch. The old studs kept bending the cheap 16d nails I was using. Since the piece will be buried, you can likely just clip off many of the nails instead of fighting with them, unless they will get in the way of the new nails.
aem sends....
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