door bell not ringing

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Hello..
My door bell has stopped working correctly. Need some advice before tearing everything apart..
The button outside is illuminated.. When pressed, light turns off, but does not trip off door bell unless I press and hold multiple times. (when doorbell goes off and depress button, the button stays off until chimes end.. times when doorbell does not go off while holding down and release, light goes back on..
Don't think it is switch because light works, and turns off when press down.. so, I think the circuit is being completed to the door bell..
My guess is either transformer or bell itself.. But, if transformer is not working correctly, no current would be going to the switch, correct??
Transformer is about 5 years old.. Door bell is OLD..
thanks.
Chris
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*Remove the button and short the wires together momentarily to see how well the doorbell operates.
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you need to press the button.
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In typed:

Not necessarily correct, no. Kill pwr to the xfmr and ohm out the wires & contacts. A relay is probably not working correctly.
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On Sun, 19 Dec 2010 12:47:24 -0500, "Twayne"

No relays. The switch contacts are likely bad - shorting the switch will confirm. If shorting the switch doesn't work, most likely cause is a bad chime, since power is getting to the button light.
I'm betting onr a bad button though
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On 12/19/2010 10:12 AM snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca spake thus:

Yes, really: where do you figure a relay is here? Now, if it's some kind of mil-spec doorbell, maybe it has a relay ...
--
Comment on quaint Usenet customs, from Usenet:

To me, the *plonk...* reminds me of the old man at the public hearing
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In typed:

It's one of a set of possibilities; if there is no relay, well, think hard now<g>!
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Couple of possibilities: First, it sounds like you have a motorized 4-8 note chime, and not the typical ding dong. Some of these old models require 24 volt transformers to work properly, not the typical 16 volt. Check inside the chime for the specs. Second, many of these old motorized chimes don't work properly with lighted push buttons. Do what John Grabowski recommends and shunt the two push button wires to see if that makes it work properly. you may have to eliminate the lighted PB
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Chris wrote:

It's the button.
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If it's the button, why does the light go off when pressed? Seems to me it's a high impedance somewhere, the transformer perhaps.
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It goes off because it breaks the light contact, but does not make a good enough contact to ring the bell. BTDT
My doorbell was broken for 20 years and I finally fixed it. Thankfully it broke again; this time it will stay broken. People that I want to see know to come to the side door.
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That's not how doorbell switches work. There is only one (normally open) contact with the light across it (there is no "breaking" of the light contact). When the button is pushed the circuit is closed, causing the bell to ring and the light to go out. If the light goes out, the switch is closed.

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Maybe, but it is still not good enough to ring the bell. At least it was in my case. Replacing the button fixed it. Easy enough to check rather than the OP insist it is not without doing the simplest check first.
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That's true enough.
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On Sun, 19 Dec 2010 16:21:48 -0600, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

Don't bet on it. All it has to do is pass as much current as the light needs to turn the light off - which may not be enough to run the chime. The ONLY way (well, the simplest, anyway) to know is to short the button.

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On Sun, 19 Dec 2010 14:51:00 -0600, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

Read my other post.

Yes, high impedance, in the doorbell button. :)
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snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

Excellent analysis. After due consideration, it is my opinion that your problem lies with the button.
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Agreed. It's the part that's exposed to the elements and skin oil and whatever else people have on their fingertips when they push the button. (Eeeewwwwuuuu!) It's the most likely point of failure and very easy to test. It's where I would start to look unless I knew that something had changed elsewhere in the "chain."
If that didn't improve things, I would then disassemble and clean the chime module since that's the only other moving part and could have accumulated dust and pet hair inside the mechanism. I'd probably measure the resistance of the wires at the doorbell button before I took apart the chime to see if there was a problem in the wiring.
-- Bobby G.
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On Sun, 19 Dec 2010 09:26:33 -0800 (PST), Chris

It's not the transformer. They dont' break like "this" whatever this is.
I'd pull out the doobbell button and touch the wires together. That's better than the assumption you've made.
I think the button is dirty inside. It's the only part of this system that is outside, and who wants to live outside? Would you put your children on the front porch year after year, never letting them come in? Would you do it? Yet you do it to your doorbell button. You should be reported to the police. Button-abuser!!
You deserve all the troubles it's giving you, considering how you treat it.
It's dirty enough to not let the bell work, but not so dirty that the light doesn't go out. That's not hard. The neon light has a fairly high resistance. The button when closed will have a resistance lower than the light, so most of the current will bypass the light. But not enough will pass to power the doorbell, which has to move the hammer, the rod inside the solenoid, fast enough to make the plate vibrate when it hits it (and also against a spring, a weak spring for sure, but it makes the power requirement slightly higher).

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On 12/19/2010 8:19 PM, mm wrote: <snip>

<snip>
What neon light? I thought we were talking about a doorbell button.
No neon light I've ever seen will fire on 24 volts.
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