dog crap makes lawn green

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What is is that makes the lawn green around the edges of dog crap? Nitrogen? I wonder if anyone has ever stirred up some crap diluted with water and spread it on a lawn. It seems to be better than whatever else people use and the green seems to stay for a long time around the dead center of the ex-crap.
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AKA Gray Asphalt wrote:

Google "manure".
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I thought that you meant that dog shit was also called 'google manure', funny but dumb, on my part.

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On Thu, 8 Jun 2006 13:06:17 -0700, "AKA Gray Asphalt"

Dog waste poses threat to water By Traci Watson, USA TODAY
http://www.usatoday.com/news/science/2002-06-07-dog-usat.htm
Pick up and discard dog droppings from turf areas. The droppings will burn grass plants if left for an extended period of time.
http://www.hgic.umd.edu/content/lawns.cfm
Make it a habit of regularly picking up your dog's droppings, or harmful bacteria will grow on it.
http://www.hgtv.com/hgtv/ah_pets_training/article/0,,HGTV_3155_1398526,00.html
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snipped-for-privacy@xxoptonline.net (Cue) wrote in

Besides drawing flies and stinking.
The flies that land on your dog's shit also land on you,your kids and your food(if picnicking,barbecuing).
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Jim Yanik
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If you spray the crap with water and it disintegrates there aren't any flies, imo.
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No,they've already left to hang out by your screen door,and in your garage. So they can enter your house when you open a door.
Besides,flies can still land on tiny bits of shit.Just spraying it with water only keeps it fresher for the flies.
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Do you use manure on your lawn?
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Apartment;my discourteous neighbors often leave dog crap around. The managers take care of the grounds,I believe the lawn maintenance company uses commercial fertilizer.
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AKA Gray Asphalt wrote:

Andy writes: Same effect as the grass being really green over your septic tank drainfield (if you have one).
You can harness this effect by using a porta-potty instead of you bathroom toilet, and emptying it on your yard where you want to enhance the grass.... Just don't tell anyone.....
">)))) Andy
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Sure mix it with water and spray it on everything, you your neighbors and flies will love the smell.
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They won't have to be told.
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AKA Gray Asphalt wrote:

Hi, Now you know. Your own crap will do the same, LOL.
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On Mon, 5 Jun 2006 22:57:43 -0700, "AKA Gray Asphalt"

They sell manure at the garden shop. And if you drive by many farms at the right time, you can smell it.
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You can always use your own manure:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Humanure
Humanure

"Humanure" is a neologism designating human waste (feces and urine) that is recycled via composting for agricultural or other purposes. The term was popularized by The Humanure Handbook, a 1994 book by Joseph Jenkins that advocates the use of this organic soil amendment.
Humanure is not traditional sewage that has been processed by waste-treatment facilities, which may include waste from industrial and other sources; rather, it is the combination of feces and urine with paper and additional carbon material (such as sawdust). By not disposing of feces and urine through the typical use of a flush toilet, nutrients can be returned to the soil instead of polluting the water table.
Humanure is deemed safe for humans to use on crops as long as it has been composted properly. This means that thermophilic decomposition of the humanure must heat it sufficiently to remove or destroy harmful pathogens, or enough time must have elapsed since fresh manure was added that biological activity has killed most pathogens. To be safe for crops, a curing stage is often needed to allow a second mesophilic phase to reduce phytotoxins.
Humanure is different from night soil, which is raw human refuse spread on crops.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Night_soil
Night soil

Night soil is a euphemistic term for human feces in regards to waste management, especially in developing nations or in areas that lack adequate infrastructure to have a sewage system, running water or septic disposal. In this policy of waste management, the human feces stays in its solid form, and is excreted into a honey bucket, together with urine and other waste. Often the deposition occurs within the residence, such as in a shophouse faced with overpopulation or heavily isolated rural areas.
The deposition is however generally temporary. In urban areas, usually slums, a night soil collector will arrive regularly, at varying time periods depending on the supply and demand for night soil collection. Usually this occurred during the nighttime, giving the night soil its name. In isolated rural areas such as in farms, the household will usually dispose of the night soil themselves, but this practice is generally not referred to as night soil, though the eventual fate of the night soil, and style of handling, is similar.
Even particularly wealthy families in some parts of the world during the 1800s were forced to use the practice of night soil because of the lack of adequate infrastructure. The term is particularly known, or even particularly infamous among the generations that were born in various parts of China or Chinatowns (depending on the development of the infrastructure) before 1960. Post-World War II Chinatown, Singapore before the independence of Singapore heavily utilised night soil collection as a primary means of waste disposal, especially as much of the infrastructure was damaged and took a long time to rebuild following the Battle of Singapore and subsequent Japanese Occupation of Singapore. Following the subsequent development of the economy and the standard of living after independence, the night soil system in Singapore is now merely a curious anecdote of colonial rule, as well as most parts of the People's Republic of China although still present in some parts of it.
The collection method is generally very manual and heavily relies on close human contact with the waste. During the Nationalist era when the Kuomintang ruled mainland China, as well as Chinatown in Singapore, the night soil collector usually arrived with spare and relatively empty honey buckets to exchange for the full honey buckets. The method of transporting the honey buckets from individual households to collection centres was very similar to delivering water supplies by coolie, with the exception that the item being transported was not at all potable and it was being delivered from the household, rather than to the household. The collector would hang the full honey buckets onto a pole he carried on his back and then proceeded to carry it through the streets until he reached the collection point. This was not unreasonably an unpleasant occupation, and was often done by manual labourers who had become used to the stench.
After arriving at a collection point, usually as a special treatment centre within the city, or perhaps an open cesspit, methods on dealing with the waste varies. The waste may go on being shipped to another larger centre to be ultimately taken care of, or be disposed of at that particularly juncture. Generally, the human waste is very attractive as fertiliser and is used for this purpose because of the high demand for fertilizer and the relative abundance of night soil. This is a highly hazardous practice because of the human disease microbes in human feces. Nevertheless, in developing nations it is a common practice. Worm infections, such as Ascariasis in these countries are linked to Night soil, since the larvae are in feces. There have also been cases of disease-carrying tomatoes, lettuce, and other vegetables being imported from undeveloped nations into more developed nations. However, night soil does not necessarily need to be reused as fertiliser and may be merely be disposed of and remain unused.
The safe reduction of human waste into compost is possible, but fairly complex. Many municipalities create compost from the city sewage system, but then recommend that it only be used on flower beds, not vegetable gardens. Some claims have been made that this is dangerous or inappropriate without the expensive removal of heavy metals.
India's ancient caste system assigned untouchables with the disposal of night soil. This "manual scavenging" is now illegal in most Indian states, although the practice undoubtedly continues in many rural areas.
The proper disposal or recycling of sewage remains an important research area that is also highly political
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wrote:

I can get all I need (mostly from cows) from my farm outside town.
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Thanks for all of the technical analysis. I kinda knew that crap was manure.
Crap seems to work better though. And diluted dog crap won't stink worse than steer manure ... as if lawns don't already have dog crap on them.
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On Mon, 5 Jun 2006 22:57:43 -0700, "AKA Gray Asphalt"

Too much crap makes the grass turn yellow and die, but the right amount does make it greener.
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Yep
The folks in Milwaukee have been doing it for decades, as "Milorganite", which is a favorite (see Carl in Caddyshack) of golf course grounds keepers everywhere.
Good for flowers and other things that grow as well as grass.
-- If I had something to say, this is where I'd say it.
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wrote:

Probably not -dog- crap,though. Perhaps "zoo-doo",which I hear is in high demand these days.

One thing about animal feces,you can spread parasites and diseases around easier by using it. Google "zoonosis". It's dust is also not healthy to inhale.
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Jim Yanik
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