Does toilet mounting flange need to be mounted?

To make a short story long...
Problem was small leak at toilet base after every flush. I figured wax seal was leaking, and after removing bowl, I was right. What I noticed was that the metal (and plastic) flange that holds the bowl mounting bolts was only pressed into the drain pipe.
To make the bowl more solidly mounted, should I:
A: Bolt the flange into the concrete.
B: Use the other 2 mounting holes in the bowl with some washers, nuts, and red heads coming up from the concrete (a bad option should I change the toilet later to one with only two mounting holes).
C: Put a bead of silcone around the base of the bowl (also not a great option since it wont show leaks easily).
BTW, I replaced the wax seal with one of those Fluid Master wax-free bowl gasket kits. This is the second one I have installed and they work awesome.
Mike
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The flange should definitely be hard mounted to the floor. typically, there is a series of 6 holes around the ring that are for screws (or whatever is the right fastener - if your in concrete, you may want to use expansion bolts). the flange should also be conencted to the drain line. If its PVC, its easy - clean out the joint, prime and glue. If its a metal fitting, it needs to be soldered. In either case, make sure that the "keyhole" slots (where the toilet bolts on) are on the sides before you bolt everything down. that way the bowl will go on facing the right way. even though the rings rotate, they won't after its screwed to the floor. The wax ring may have failed because of movement in the joint. Once everthing is properly mounted, the toilet shouldn't move at all. The wax ring should pretty much last until the toilet is removed.....
--JD

was
and
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks JD:
It is PVC. But if I glue the PVC part of the flange to the drain pipe and have to change out the flange in the future, will not that be a problem?
Thanks again,
Mike
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<< if I glue the PVC part of the flange to the drain pipe and have to change out the flange in the future, will not that be a problem? >>
It will be unless you use some finesse in removing it. One way that works is to use a big hole saw like 3" or whatever your pipe I.D. is, and simply bore out the old flange. The inner shape of the flange makes it fairly easy to center your hole saw and the new flange will cement into the newly bored hole perfectly. Helps to have a slow speed VS drill that is pretty hefty. I use a 600 RPM 1/2" Milwaukee with nice big handles. HTH
Joe
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
yaeh, it could be, (but look at what Joe B says). However, there shouldn't ever be a reason to remove it. A good PVC install should last as long as the rest of the plumbing system, and should certainly last longer than a bathroom (they tend to get renovated evry 15 years or so...). Unless you're bouncing around on your toilet (or some other wierd thing like that), you prbably shouldn't worry about having to replace the PVC flange....
--JD

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
for good sex i alwayze mount it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks for TMI advice. I am then assuming you always mount with Red Heads?
Mike
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.