Does the washer create pressure when draining?


Hi,
I'm hoping to move my washer and dryer downstairs. In order to accomplish that, I will need to learn how run pipes, work with gas, run the exaughst from the heater and how to cut into the main drain stack. Since the last task seems the most daunting I'm hoping to be able to temporarily utilize a sink that is about 20 feet away.
I am wondering if I can run the drain hose from the washer up to ceiling, over to the sink and then down. So my question is this, does the washer create pressure when draining that will be sufficient to push the water up the hose?
Many thanks in advance!
Aaron
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Washer manufacturers generally specify a maximum height for the drain and I do not think it is likely to be ceiling height. Another problem would be the backflow of the drainage water in the pipe when the pump stops. Your best bet would be to install an open drain pipe just high enough to get the water in the sink. You may need a fairly large pipe to carry the needed volume at the low slope. You might get satisfactory drainage by leaving the hose down on the floor, connecting a floor level drain hose, and bringing it up to normal height at the sink.
Don Young
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My friend used to have her washer in a basemennt and I think her's went up about 10 ft. The water drained to her garden outside at the foot of the hill. I think what made it work is that after the pipe got out side it dropped about 10ft down the hill. I this is prevented the backflow by siphoning most of the water on out.
Jimmie
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Don Young wrote:

FWIW, I am pushing the capabilities of my brand-new 3 years ago low-end washer, using a 3-foot extension on the drain hose, to make it to the standpipe septic tank drain on the wall about 5 feet off the floor, 4 feet over. (Previous owner allowed the gray water stand-pipe the washer used to drain into to rust out, somewhere out in the dirt. I tested it with a hose when I moved in, and had a flooded basement an hour later.) It works well enough with normal loads, but if I wash pillows or something, it tends to back up and come out through the washer's overflow drain (top of the tub?) and end up all over the floor. So until when and if I feel rich enough to have a pro redo all the basement drains, looks like it is back to laundromat for all the big stuff a couple times a year.
-- aem sends...
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Googled ....
washing machine pump head
yielded
http://www.applianceblog.com/mainforums/showthread.php?t=5100
http://www.homerepairforum.com/forum/plumbing/4123-washing-machine-pump-strong.html
http://www.homerepairforum.com/forum/plumbing/4123-washing-machine-pump-strong.html
But as mentioned in these threads, there's more to this installation than just pump head. If you don't do it right you can have back flow problems & potential water supply contamination.
You can determine washer pump output vs discharge height by doing the experimentl yourself. As a limiting point, determine the outlet height that "stalls" the pump (ie, no output) and determine the flow at pipe height your installation requires.
cheers Bob
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"But as mentioned in these threads, there's more to this installation than just pump head. If you don't do it right you can have back flow problems & potential water supply contamination."
I don't think there is a potential contamination problem.
That would only occur if, somehow, the water supply connection were under water. But in most American type washing machines, the water outlet is above the rim of the outer "tank."
You just can't fill the tub high enough to put the fresh water outlet under the water level. The water will just overflow the tub and flood the room.
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John-
Despite what I commented & what those links contain, I would agree with you...........
the possibility of fresh water supply contamination is very remote.
Washer fill lines (at least on the washers that I've worked on) have some sort of air gap.
As do dishwashers......
so why do many jurisdictions require air gaps on dishwasher drains? I've often wondered about that.
OP-
Do the head experiment with your washer, install a sloped pipe, 3" diameter would be good (~at least 1/8" per ft, 1/4" per ft if possible).
Install a "Tee" near the high end of the drain line with a stub pipe going up into the joist space (this will give you "air gap" behavior).
Dump the drainline into the sink (you can go all the way into the sink, since back siphon will be impossible with the Tee in place)
cheers Bob
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wrote:

John-
Despite what I commented & what those links contain, I would agree with you...........
the possibility of fresh water supply contamination is very remote.
Washer fill lines (at least on the washers that I've worked on) have some sort of air gap.
As do dishwashers......
so why do many jurisdictions require air gaps on dishwasher drains? I've often wondered about that.
OP-
Do the head experiment with your washer, install a sloped pipe, 3" diameter would be good (~at least 1/8" per ft, 1/4" per ft if possible).
Install a "Tee" near the high end of the drain line with a stub pipe going up into the joist space (this will give you "air gap" behavior).
Dump the drainline into the sink (you can go all the way into the sink, since back siphon will be impossible with the Tee in place)
cheers Bob Air gaps in drains are generally to prevent siphoning of water from the traps.
Don Young
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traps.<<<<
But do dishwashers have traps? The water is pumped out......
Wouldn't the garbage disposal prevent siphoning behavior?
I'm just asking......I've seen lots of dishwashers without air gaps & they seem to work fine.
cheers Bob
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BobK207 wrote:

Don't most of them use high loops to serve the same function?
-- aem sends...
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Yes your washer will pump enough pressure to reach the ceiling. Ir you're draining into a sink, just make sure the pipe along the ceiling slopes towards the sink. Plus, the end of the drain pipe at the sink must terminate above the maximum water level of the sink. Code normally calls for a 2" pipe when a washer drains into a standpipe. But you should oversize the pipe along the ceiling to prevent backup--washers drain a lot of water very quickly. A long pipe will cause pressure loss.
If you were going to tap this pipe into the drain system, the washer hose would have to go into an air gap first to meet code. This is usually done by installing a P trap in the joist area of the ceiling and then running the line into the stack.
But if you can live with the drain running into the sink, you should be ok.
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Dear Elmer Fude,
Do I read that you're learning gas, exhaust, and plumbing for this job? And that the drain pipe worries you the most? I'd be more worried about the gas, which can explode, and blow down your house. Or the exhaust, which can kill your family with carbon monoxide.
Don't thank me, I do this for fun. Miss ray of sunshine, here. Wasketty Wabbit.
--
Christopher A. Young
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