Does my UPS work?

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On 8/21/2015 6:09 AM, micky wrote:

In general, you should be able to replace the batteries and extend the "life" of the UPS. The UPS manufacturer would like you to purchase the batteries from *them* -- at a highly inflated price!
Most batteries are standard case sizes (sometimes there are ~0.1" differences). Virtually all used in UPS's are 12V -- though some UPS's will use 1, 2 or 4 such batteries (12, 24 or 48V).
If yours uses more than one battery, it is usually wise to replace ALL at the same time; a "weak" battery will alter the way the charge is shared among the batteries, typically shortening life.
If you opt to replace batteries, be sure to salvage any wiring harness that is present. For a single battery, sometimes there is just a "fancy connector" that transitions from the battery to the UPS. Other times, there are wires (possibly including fusible links) interconnecting the batteries within the "battery pack" (the batteries are sometimes fastened together -- tape? -- to form a single unit).
Almost all UPS batteries (at least SOHO units) have "spade"/faston terminals. These come in two typical sizes -- 0.25 and 0.187 (IIRC). Obviously, you don't want a battery that has a larger terminal than the mating cable can accommodate (it won't fit on!). But, you also don't want a battery with a smaller terminal (you'll end up with a tenuous fit that could end up being a high resistance connection).
For battery "packs", you can also fabricate your own from discrete batteries held together with 2" cellophane packing tape.
It is often tedious to extract the battery pack from many UPS's. They are designed for a tight fit -- don't want the battery flopping around in there as it represents a significant mass.
Often, failed batteries will "bloat" -- you will actually see that they have EXPANDED/bulged during use. In this case, it is often hard to extract the batteries ("tight fit"). Rather than dismantling the UPS itself (which will leave you with a bunch of DANGLING parts as they are "fitted" into the plastic case; not held with fasteners!), try to loosen the appropriate screws as if you were going to disassemble the case. This extra "slop" usually makes it easier to remove the battery -- esp if it has "bulged".
Of course, don't short the battery (new or used) as they are capable of delivering a fair bit of current (e.g., hold your wedding band across the battery terminals and feel it get HOT! :> )
Dispose of defective batteries responsibly. They contain lead so represent hazardous waste. There are usually places in town where these can be recycled -- the lead is extracted, "cleaned up" and then reused (to make NEW batteries).

Typically, you size the test load at 1/3 the nameplate rating of the UPS. Too small and you aren't really checking to see that it can handle a *reasonable* load. Too large and you'll probably get failures from "old batteries".
Some UPS's will not turn on unless AC mains power is available.
Many (esp APC units) UPS's will do a battery test on startup (and then periodically, thereafter). If the UPS complains after/during this test, chances are your battery (or battery connections) are faulty. (it's looking to see how much and how quickly the battery voltage "sags" under that known test load)
Some UPS's will omit the test cycle if they detect a *missing* battery pack -- but will perform the test if they detect a present but "dead" battery pack! The former is useful: it allows you to use the UPS as an "outlet strip/surge protector" even if the backup function is not available (because the battery is missing).
[I have a dozen UPS's here that primarily serve as "outlet strips" -- I can turn off a computer and its monitor plus any peripherals with that one button/switch -- instead of having to turn off the individual items]
For UPS's that test batteries periodically, a failing battery can screw you unexpectedly: the UPS goes to test the battery at some "random" time by essentially switching to backup power. If the battery is toast, your computer will now crash! (i.e., when the battery is known to be dying/dead, just remove it until you get a replacement)

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In alt.home.repair, on Fri, 21 Aug 2015 10:54:57 -0700, Don Y

I tihnk you're right. I noticed that the $7 UPS had replacement dates written on it 2002 and 2007, so maybe it was first used in 1997. It's not that it lasted 8 years this time. The battery has probably been bad for years.
However I tested it, and the DVDRt turned off when I unplugged the UPS. It didnt' forget the list of programs to be recorded and that's the most important thing. It takes me a long time to rebuild that list.

Okay.

I have a roll of 2-sided carpet tape, but haven't seen it in years. It's not where it's supposed to be.

One of the three had instructions to push the On button for 10 seconds and it would turn on, so you can squeeze a few minutes out of your equipment if you have to.
They call the APC instructions manuals, but theyr'e only 2 pages long, and some are arranged funny, sort of horizontally, so when you enlarge the PDF file to be big enough to read, I at least found it hard to read, left to right, up and down.

I'd hate that.

To answer my own question, No. The problem was that the batteries inside were dead. Two different model UPSes wouldnt' do a thing, not even light up the Online light (which only means it has AC power), when the batteries inside were dead. Not a design I approve of. I almost thought one was totally broken, and I might have wasted time testing the outlet, etc.
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Try asking in http://forums.apc.com/ as well.
On 8/21/2015 6:09 AM, micky wrote:

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