Does it matter where the tap for a mid-circuit rececpticle is?

I have a mid-circuit recepticle box. Most of the wiring I've seen has the tap for the recepticle in the recepticle box itself. I was wondering if it's OK practice to make the tap in an accesible junction box about 18 feet away from the recepticle box? This way I'd only have to run 2 wires instead of 4 from the junction box to the recepticle box. I don't see my 2002 NEC addressing this.
(More detail here if you need it: All concrete house. All wiring is in IMC with the conduit itself acting as ground. The branch circuits are run in exposed conduit along a concrete ceiling. To get to wall boxes the conduit branches off, penetrates the concrete block wall, and drops down (concealed) thru the cores until it connects to the outlet and switch boxes embedded in the wall. The recepticle box I refer to is one of these. The junction box I refer to is on the ceiling.)
One disadvantage I can see to it this is: to anyone servicing the outlet, it might look like an end-of-circuit, rather than mid-ciruit outlet.
I'm not splitting hairs. There are many outlets to which I have to apply this decision.
What I describe about the tap might be allowed, but is it good practice?
--wahzoo
(PS. Unrelated, but I've yet to decide whether install a grounding wire. I understand it's redundant in my situation, but safer.)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes, it's OK provided the box is large enough to accommodate more wires. You may have to put an extension ring on it.

If someone can't follow an exposed conduit, I'd say that they don't have any business messing with the outlet the first place.

When running conduit, it's not uncommon. Installing 4 wires as you stated would be strange. Unless the house is very old or a prison, I also find it unusual that the conduit is IMC. EMT will suffice and will be much easier to install.

If you install an equipment grounding conductor (egc), it needs to be bonded to each box also. If the conduit and fittings are installed wrench tight you should be OK without the egc. Steel fittings are much more reliable for conducting a ground-fault than the diecast zinc fittings.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.