Does it matter if kitchen floor cabinets are not level?


The floor has a gradient. I built on this floor a cement base( or you can call it a raise platform usually for placing a kitchen cabinet on it, so that the cabinet footing will not come into contact with water when I wash the floor)
Now my resulting cement base follows the gradient of the orignal floor. I intend to tile it up. That means that I have the final chance to change the gradient to a perfect level. This can be done when I put on the tiles on the cement base and level the tiles to a perfect level instead of a gradient.
I am tempted to just opt for whichever provide the most ease of work. Any advise?
Thanks?
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A wooden platform would have been easier to build -- and easier to change in the future. Somebody's going to want to remodel that kitchen some day.

Yes. It does matter if the base cabinets are not level. The cabinets themselves don't really matter, but your cooking surface matters very much.
The cooking surface needs to be as close to level as possible, so that sauces, and oils for frying or sauteeing, cover the bottom of the pan to a uniform depth. If the cooking surface is not level, it's very difficult to prepare sauces properly: while waiting for a sauce to thicken on the low side of the tilt (where it's deeper), you're burning it on the high side (where it's too shallow). Same goes for frying and sauteeing.
Any cooktop that mounts directly onto the countertop will be only as close to level as the countertop.
A free-standing range can be levelled independently of the countertop, of course -- but if the countertops are not level, and the range is, it will be obvious. It'll look like a sloppy, amateur job of installation.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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I think I'd try leveling shims 'till you finish it
jvm
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Assuming countertops are going on top of the cabinets, they should be level. That means either you have to have the cabinets level, or else screw around shimming the countertops, which doesn't sound advisable. Plus, we don't know what the "gradient" is. Why didn't you make the cabinet base level when you poured the concrete?
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Doing it right is not always the easiest, but it is always "right". Get it level. You'll appreciate it later.
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I had an addition put on, and they didn't get a floor level. It didn't much matter, but it drove me crazy until I had it leveled.
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a1esta wrote:

Sounds like a plan. Be sure you have all tiles at same height. I watched a neighbor carefully check the level of all the pavers he cemented to the sidewalk - unfortunately, he had each at a tad different height so he gets puddles.
You could just run a bead of caulk along base of cabinet, or wring out the mop; so much easier :o)
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