Does having multiple RJ45 jacks degrade the Internet signal a lot?

Page 4 of 12  
On 12/25/2011 8:17 PM, Jeff Liebermann wrote:

them going through the house, much like what the OP wants. I don't know if he ever checked them for speed.
I might just get a Dlink router and chalk the Linksys box (not a cheap one) up to experience. The one time I needed support from D-Link, it was excellent. I can't say my experience with Linksys is the same.
I fired up some Dlink WAPs about two years ago. Old B stuff I no longer used, but wanted to do a quick bridge. They still worked. I've had Netgear stuff fail under two years. Twice. However, they may not suck anymore. Or maybe I got junk. People complain about Netgear power supplies, but mine were fine. I saved the wall warts and trashed the rest.
Netgear used to have a different name. It was a product of a merger IIRC>

Ah yes, Bay Networks.

According to wiki (which of course doesn't mean much), Netgear is outsourced and D-Link is not. I don't get too bent out of shape regarding OEMs, but I ODM-ing is another story. Support on ODM gear tends to be poor. When you use ODMs, then you are just shipping black boxes.
I'm just appalled at the crappy service I got from Linksys on a box close to $200.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Being in the business, I have had more D-Link consumer equipment failures than any other brand. Their commercial grade stuff is so-so. The only one's I've used have failed within 5 years. I'm currently using an Airlink NIMO router in the basement of my 2 storey house and the signal is useable throught the whole house and 15 feet behind the house on the patio as well.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Is this the Airlink 101 stuff that Fry's practically gives away?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/26/2011 9:14 AM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I've got their stuff for free or maybe a few bucks, but I'd have a hard time suggesting anyone consider Airlink 101 for anything serious. I did set up two of their routers for other people. Documentation is slim, but thus far no failures, so I guess I could recommend Airlink 101 over Netgear, but I'd sooner take Dlink over Airlink 101 any day, simply due to better documentation and easier to use firmware. I've haven't had any dlink failures, if a sample of 5 means anything.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 24 Dec 2011 13:36:12 -0800, Jeff Liebermann wrote:

I don't currently have any coaxial cable.
The Ubiquiti Bullet M2 radio is actually screwed directly onto the back of the antenna at the top of the mast. (Later, I'll add a ten-foot pigtail coaxial cable to bring the radio to the bottom of the antenna for ease of maintenance.)
From the radio at the top of the antenna, it's all outdoor cat5 cable (twisted pair, UV protected, 24 AWG, solid conductor, $75 for 500 feet at Home Depot).
The only reason the antenna is about 75 feet from the house is that's the highest point. The roof is clay and I keep breaking the tiles when I go up there so I vowed to not put anything on the roof itself!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 24 Dec 2011 13:36:12 -0800, Jeff Liebermann wrote:

You're clever.
I had not mentioned it, but, you noticed I went to a lot of trouble to locate the drill hole next to a stud so that I could attach the cat5 box to the stud.
I actually drilled DOWN from the wall to the crawl space even though the picture shows the drill bit coming up (so I could show the drill bit).

I haven't drilled the entrance hole to the house yet - so that's EXCELLENT ADVICE!
I don't plan on putting anything "in the wall" - but - I might put the POE and/or the suggested ethernet switch in the crawl space (there is power cabling all over the crawl space but no actual outlets).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/25/2011 12:09 AM, Chuck Banshee wrote:

Besides the drip line, you might want to google waterproof cable entry
There a probably a thousand schemes for cable entry. I've even see hacks of the cable entry used to get mains into the house. I got a bunch of Andrews cable entries that showed up an a surplus shop. Andrews is what they use in repeater sites, cellular sites, etc.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 24 Dec 2011 13:36:12 -0800, Jeff Liebermann wrote:

Thanks; that's what I needed to know!

I have plenty of cable (I bought 500 feet of Home Depot outdoor rated cat5 cable for $75) and the entire run is only about 100 feet to the newly drilled hole in the office at the center of the house.

That's good to know!
That means if I put the POE & ethernet switch on an indoor shelf in the garage where the outdoor cat5 enters the house, I can then connect two female ports of the ethernet switch to two male RJ45 connectors on a single run of 25 foot cat5 cable to the center of the house under the crawl space and up through the hole I already drilled, and then put TWO female jacks at the center of the house in that wall (both using the same cat5 cable).
I had not realized this was a possibility until you mentioned it just now. Thanks.
PS: Thanks for admonishing me on the 'wire' versus 'cable' (I'll use the term "cable" as there are no wires involved).

Again, very good information.
That means I probably want the POE earlier on in the star topology rather than later on if I plan on using a single cable to serve two connections.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 25 Dec 2011 08:18:33 +0000 (UTC), Chuck Banshee

it right and run 2 cables - which will allow you to move to gigabyte ethernet later if technology dictates. Gives you redundancy too.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 25 Dec 2011 14:34:36 -0500, clare wrote:

I understand and agree.
Home Depot didn't have anything between 100 feet (which was too short) and 500 feet (which is probably three times what I need).
Here's a picture of the box of cable that I bought: - $75 cat5e 24AWG solid core indoor/outdoor "tan" -

Here are 6 pictures of the current (abomination) setup: http://groups.google.com/group/alt.internet.wireless/msg/e153f219bb15302a
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 24 Dec 2011 13:36:12 -0800, Jeff Liebermann wrote:

Just a little? :)
Based on the advice, I think I'll go with the star topology.
I think I'll add the active ethernet switch (although I'm confused whether the Linksys WRT54G router is 'already' an ethernet switch).
I think I'll double the amount of wall jacks that I think I need.
And, if the POE isn't involved, I'll put two jacks on a single cable.
This is how I'm leaning - now that I've been given the Christmas gift of all this great advice:
1. 19 dBi WISP antenna 2. Ubiquiti Bullet M2 router (Radio mode, DHCP server, NAT turned on) 3. No pigtail currently - but a 10-foot N pigtail would bring the radio down to ground level for ease of maintenance 4. From the bullet, out comes RJ45 outdoor cat5 cabling 5. That goes to a 15 volt Ubiquiti POE which must be located inside the house (it's not an outdoor POE) 6. I'll drill a hole (upward at an angle) into the garage wall to enter the house. 7. At that point, I can add an inexpensive 10/100 four-port active ethernet switch (any recommendations on which one?) 8. From that central point of the star, I can send one cable with two connectors on it to the office in the center of the house so that there are two female ports in the wall where I've already drilled a hole. 8a. At the office, I'll connect one of those two ports to a Linksys WRT54G router to serve the wireless devices in the household. 9. From the ethernet switch, I can send another cable to the game room where another two ports can be placed in the wall. 9a. From one of those game room ports, I can connect a cat5 cable to the WII
Total equipment: - cat5 cable (outdoor rated, 24 AWG, solid conductor, 500 feet available) - basic 10/100 active Ethernet switch (to act as the center of the star) - one cable with two plugs going to the office - two-port wall plate at the office (one port connected to WRT54G router) - one cable with two plugs going to the game room - two-port wall plate at the game room (one port connected to Wii game)
One question that remains is that with this setup, all the devices except the game room devices will be on the other side of the home WRT54G router.
But, the game room will be only on the other side of the radio/router at the antenna.
I think that means they'll both be on non-routable networks - but that the game room will be behind only one router (the one on the antenna) while the office equipment will be being two routers (the antenna radio plus the Linksys WRT54G).
Does my understanding of the recommended setup make sense given all the advice provided?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Maybe I'm missing something, but I don't see the need for another switch. From the description, you add a switch where the WISP enters the house, then run two ethernet connections from there to the office where the wirless router will be going. But that router will have 4 ports, so why the seperate switch?
I'd do a run straight from the antenna to a suitable location for the wireless router which sounds like the office. Then I'd do any wired runs that are practical from the router. Typical router supports 4 wired connections. Do you need more than that? If you want 3 or 4 in the game room, then I'd put a switch there.
I'd power the WISP where the router is, or split it off near where it enters the house if that is more practical.
Only other issues I'd be concerned with is that the wire used for the low voltage power is of sufficient gauge for the length. Perhaps somewhere in the instructions it says it's good for distance X, etc. Or if you're just using the total length of wire came that with it, then you know it's OK.
The other issue is lightning protection. That outdoor antenna should be directly grounded. And there should be lightning protection on the wires that enter the building. Curious, presumably the WISP setup came with instructions. What do they say about this?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 25 Dec 2011 06:25:33 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

That was the original plan.

I only need ONE in the game room.
What you are saying hits on the original design objective. I wish my command of English were better because I confused everyone (I think) because I'm confused HOW to wire from the router to the game room in this scenario.
Is this the correct scenario for the sum total of the house wiring? 1. Cat5 cable enters house at lowered garage at the near end of the house 2. Cat5 continues into crawl space & into office floor in house center 3. Cat5 ends at a single female RJ45 in the (centrally located) office 4. Another cat5 cable starts at another single RJ45 in the office wall 5. That (inactive) cat5 goes down into the crawl space to the game room 6. That (inactive) cat5 ends at a single RJ45 jack in the game room
If that is the correct wiring sequence, then I can do that relatively easily.
Now comes the active connections.
In the office - this is what I was planning: a) The POE sits in the office, one end connected to the wall plate. b) The other end of the POE connects to the Linksys WRT54G broadband wireless router (which also has four LAN ports in the back) c) One LAN port of the WRT54G goes to the desktop computer d) Another LAN port of the WRT54G goes to the Belkin VOIP desktop phone
At this point, everything but the game room is now working. The problem is that the game room is too far away for a good signal out of the WRT54G.
I have two options (I think) for the 'game room' at the far end of the house: I. Add a wireless "repeater" of some sort (the purchase & setup of which I am unfamiliar) II. Add a cabled connection
THIS IS THE PART THAT WAS CONFUSING ME IN THE BEGINNING:
If I go with the cabled connection to the game room, is it 'this' simple? A. I attach a jumper from the LAN port on the back of the WRT54G to the second office wall plate ...(this 2nd office wall plate is just a connection to the game room wall plate through the crawl space) B. I attach a jumper from the game room wall plate to the Wii
My original (I agree confused) question was: Is it 'that' simple to add the game room as a wired connection?
NOTE: It seems weird to me to have a 'dead' wire simply going from the office wall plate to the game room wall plate.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 26 Dec 2011 03:48:11 +0000 (UTC), Chuck Banshee

Yes, it's that simple. That's exactly how I've done it myself.

It's not dead once you connect devices to each end of it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Why do you have to add another cable connection between the wireless router in the office and the game room? In your house wiring plan above you clearly stated that you were installing that wiring. Otherwise what you've layed out makes sense to me.

Yes!
Now we're back to confusion land again. The line isn't dead if you're using it to connect from a port on the wireless router to an X box in the game room.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 25 Dec 2011 06:25:33 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

The salmon colored Home Depot outdoor-rated solid conductor cat5 cable ($75 for 500 feet) is 24 AWG.
I'm guessing it's ~100 feet to the office in the center of the house (including zig zags inherent in routing the wire).
The POE is 15 volts (but I have no problem buying a higher-voltage POE if that is what is needed).
I guess I 'could' go up in size to 23 AWG cat5 cable - but the initial comments intimated this gauge solid wire should be find for three times the distance I'm calculating. (I think.)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

24 gauge wire has a resistance of 2.6 ohms. If the eqpt at the far end is pulling 1 amp, you'd have a voltage drop of 2.6 volts, meaning your 15 volt source delivers 12.4 volts, which should still be OK. If it's powered from a typical wallwart power supply, I doubt it's anywhere near 1 amp so you should be fine. The label will tell you what the actual rating is

That's one thing you don't want to do!

Check the power supply and it's probably rated at a couple hundered milliamps at most and you have no problem to worry about.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 26 Dec 2011 05:19:33 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

Double your resistance and voltage drop numbers, since you have two 100' lengths of wire.
<...>
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Dec 26, 6:37pm, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

Dooh! Good point!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 26 Dec 2011 17:24:49 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

I only belatedly realized the Home Depot cat5e outdoor cable has the length printed every two feet.
It turns out that the 'estimated' outdoor 100 feet turned into 224 actual feet of cable! (The printed numbers start at the antenna at 017350 feet and end at the office wall plate at 017526.)
Personally, I'm amazed I put that much wire in the house! I made a lot of mistakes!
For one thing, I put a LOT of wire in loops in the floor rafters (for future use) but I must have put way too much there. Also I left quite a lot outside so that when I bury it, I can route around obstacles - but - again, I left quite a lot.
The main mistake I made was buying 500 feet of the expensive outdoor wire. In hindsight, I 'should' have bought 150 feet of the tan outdoor stuff, and the rest indoor blue plenum stuff because half the wire I bought will be inside the house.
But I made a LOT of other mistakes!
For example, look how CLOSE I came to cutting the electrical wire in half!

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.