Does Fix a Flat work?

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Does Fix a Flat work?
I was told by a guy that he used it when he got a flat and it did not pump up his tire completely, but got enough pressure to get to a gas station with air. However, he said that was 6 weeks ago, and the tire never leaked again.
While I do think the stuff will pump up a tire with a small leak, I tend to question the permanence of the repair. I know I would have had the tire in the shop the next day. I just can not see how this stuff can make a permanent patch on any tire.
What is your opinion and experience?
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It's not intended to fix anything permanently. If a person can read the label on the can they will be aware of that fact. It will not fix rim leaks or larger leaks. The major advantage is that it will put a bit of air in a flat tire and perhaps enable a person to get to a repair station. It's easy to use and a non-technical person can use it. On the downside it throws the tire off balance, can be flammable, and is very messy when the tire is finally fixed. A better idea for the person who can do so is to carry one of those little 12V compressors to blow their tire up in an emergency. A further step would be to learn how to plug a flat tire from the outside with a kit.
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Didn't know that was possible. Please explain.
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Toller wrote:

Go to your local autoparts store. Buy a kit $5. Read instructions. I keep a kit in my truck at all times. It amazes people :P Of course youll need the pump too.
--
Respectfully,


CL Gilbert
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Buy a tubeless tire plug kit. Very inexpensive. Consists of a tool which resembles an awl with a slot in the pointy end, a couple of cylinder shaped rubber plugs, and a tube of cement. Tread the plug through the slot in the tool and coat it with cement. Yank out the nail you ran over, and quickly shove the plug into the hole. The tool is designed so that once the plug is inserted, you can work the tool free and pull it out, leaving the plug in place. It's not a permanent repair either. You will still need to go to a repair shop and have a patch applied on the inside. The problems with plugs is that sometimes they can work their way out, and sometimes they get cut in half by the wire mesh used in layers of the tire tread.
rusty redcloud
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wrote:

I get a lot of flats. Just unlucky I guess. In my experience it's best NOT to use the rasp that comes with some plug kits because it can further damage the steel belt inside the tire. I only use the plug applicators that are closed on the end--some have a slot cut into the end and I've never understood why. I use a lot of rubber cement, push the plug all the way into the tire, and back it out carefully until it is exposed and then cut it off with a razor blade. I then add a small amount of Fix-A-Flat and drive on it soon. I have a 12 volt compressor/tire inflater (they only cost about $10-$12) which I use to fill the tire. I have had many plugs last the life of the tire with this method. But I agree it is still better to have the tire profesionally repaired.
For the most part Fix-A-Flat or whatever is really great for getting you out of a bad spot and to a place where you can either safely put on the spare of get your tire repaired. It's also good for bicycle tires and small wheels that won't hold air for very long.
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On 08/24/05 09:37 am Red Cloud tossed the following ingredients into the ever-growing pot of cybersoup:

I've read that steel-belted radials *must not be* plugged.
Perce
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I've plugged them many, many times, and never had one fail. Always have driven them until time to replace the tires. However, I only use the plugs that are like a pipe cleaner covered with tar. I don't like the rubber plug style. The pipe cleaner style do not need adhesive, other than the tar saturation.
-- ******** Bill Pounds http://www.billpounds.com
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Pounds on Wood wrote:

glue also. I always do use plenty of glue as it helps the plugs slide in the hole. There are occasions where it takes more than one plug and it can be hard to push through. As I clean the hole I decide whether a single or multiple plug is needed. As with another poster I prefer to use the closed loop tool so I can push through and pull back the nose of the plug.
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On Wed, 24 Aug 2005 10:42:05 -0400, "Percival P. Cassidy"

That's basically true, although they can be plugged as a temporary measure to get you somewhere that can effect a real, and more premanent repair.
rusty redcloud
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You read wrong. It happens all the time.
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Not in NC. Tires must be patched from the inside.

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On Wed, 24 Aug 2005 03:46:03 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@invalid.com wrote:

I've used it several times, and it always got me home. Your friend is correct that it didn't fill the tire to full pressure. Once you get going, you need to find a gas station with an air pump. The best practice is to then deflate the tire and refill it to blow any of the glue out of the valve, where it can cause problems. I do not and would not consider it a permanent repair, although I wouldn't be surprised if it held permanently. There is no substitute for a real patch on the inside, other than replacement of the tire.
Be sure to give the tire mechanic a good tip, as he is going to use up half a roll of paper towel wiping that crud out when he does the patch job.
rusty redcloud
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I always carried a can on my motorcycle treks. Had to use it once. It worked great and kept the tire full until it needed to be changed because it wore out. I agree it's only a temp fix on a car tire.
--
yustr
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snipped-for-privacy@invalid.com wrote:

Sure, most of the time. However it IS NOT a fix, it is a trip home or to the tyre store. It is not intended for long time use. It also can be a pain for anyone working on the tyre after you use it.

--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
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flat.
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wrote:

I have a spare tire, but it's a lot safer when pulled over on the shoulder to quickly apply flat fix and get going, rather than start jacking things up, struggling with stubborn lugnuts, and walking around the car as you swap tires. It's also nicer in bad weather, or if you are in a less than pleasant neighborhood. The spare tire is reserved for a real "blow out" that flat fix can't handle because the tire is split wide open or shredded.
Using the spare tire is generally not the safest option. For my diminutive wife, it's not an option at all. I would rather she didn't flag down some stranger to "assist" her.
rusty redcloud
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I tried it once and it didn't. However, the nail was still in the tire when I tried the fix-a-flat.
I'm guessing it might have worked for a nail puncture if the nail was removed.
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On 08/24/05 09:09 am Red Cloud tossed the following ingredients into the ever-growing pot of cybersoup:

I've read that in some European countries changing a wheel is part of the driving test.
Perce
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On Wed, 24 Aug 2005 10:40:02 -0400, "Percival P. Cassidy"

And????
rusty redcloud
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