Does coating stranded copper wire with solder cause any issues or break any codes?

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Good jump, paradoxical, but good.
Musta made a whole six foot by now!!

Agreed. Possibly bad design, hence design for terminals and build them correctly.

If you design with inherent flaws and then install it it'll be flawed. Period.
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Bullshit.
The only true understanding is a true interpretation.
Corinthians 2:36
My apologies
2 corinthians chapter 3 line 6.
"Who also hath made us able ministers of the new testament; not of the letter, but of the spirit:for the letter killeth, but the spirit giveth life."
http://www.bible-sermons.org.uk/bible/2-Corinthians_3 /

All statutes are open for interpretation, a judge in court interprets the statute when he passes judgement, he can do no more.

It's the only due reason I give to politicians who wish to change the present law if it is old but correct. Old English language is more difficult for the lay person to interpret and hence to understand than modern language.
But then we are not all of the same intellect, patience or will.
I'm cross posting to uk.legal.moderated and uk.legal. just for a laff!
--

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On Sun, 5 Feb 2006 15:20:27 -0000, "Billy H"
Yet you piss and moan about the way folks argue?
Did you have to requote 111 lines for this CRAP remark?
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Where is you other post, that'd sit well in here too.
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On Sun, 5 Feb 2006 19:24:42 -0000, "Billy H"

"here"? Where is "here"? Are you new to Usenet?
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uk.legal
yes my first time!!
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LAR DEE FUCKIN DAR
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On Mon, 6 Feb 2006 23:45:46 -0000, "Billy H"

That would be:
La Di Dah
Lar dee dar is from the movie "Blazing Saddles"
Does the "H" stand for "Hill"? as in Hillbilly...
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No It is Russian.
Noshart is it's pronunciation. Means 'one who shakes the sphere.'
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Harry Muscle wrote:

Before I retired I was an electronics design Engineer. I remember one time I ran into a situation where I was wondering if the wires ought to be soldiered before being placed into a connector. I checked with both the vendor (probably Molex) and our manufacturing department. I remember the answer was a resounding NO. You never soldier wires that are going to be placed in a connector.
However, sometime around 1980, after I had just moved into the house I'm in now, I had a problem with a three-way switch that didn't work in my basement and the basement was completely sheet rocked. The previous owner/amateur electrician had fouled up on the wiring. A couple of years later, I had to remove the sheet rock underneath a cold air return to facilitate the addition of a new room and I was able to fish some wire through the ceiling and fix the problem. However, this necessitated a connection that would be covered by sheet rock (no lectures please). So I put the wires in an electrical box and twisted them and put a light coat of soldier on them. Then I put wire nuts on top of that. That was 25 years ago and I have never had any problems.
In regard to aluminum house wiring (single-strand), aluminum wiring is very dangerous when used inside of a house. It's one of the easiest way I can think of to get your house burned down. Putting copper and aluminum together causes a corrosive chemical reaction. It's use should be restricted to service entrance wires only and even then you should double check to make sure the connector is marked for aluminum. As I recall, these special connectors are marked "AL/CU".
If you happen to be unfortunate enough to have single-strand aluminum wire inside your house, then you need to make sure that all of the connectors (switches and outlets) are marked "AL/CU". These special switches and outlets are relatively expensive. If you need to connect an aluminum wire and copper wire together, there are special wire nuts available for doing that (also expensive). There is also some antioxidant cream available that you can use for copper/aluminum connections.
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On 6 Feb 2006 23:47:50 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.co.uk Gave us:

You won't see a solder creep issue with that scenario. For one thing, the twisted SOLID strand wires cinch together fairly tightly even before they are soldered. Then, the CONICAL wire nut will likely always have more than enough pressure on the union for solder creep to never be a problem. Finally, the joint itself, by your own description only has a very light fill. For the solder creep to become a big problem, there would have to be so much of it that the cross sectional area of it is thick enough that solder creep could even be an issue. Also, solder creep also likes some constant stress be on the joint. The twisted SOLID wire bundles likely have no mechanical stress on them in several locations throughout the twisted assembly.
Though not spec, I see a very carefully constructed union like this as not being a problem. That is a personal view though, and an actual inspection would be required for me to conclude that the joints are truly integral.
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On 6 Feb 2006 23:47:50 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.co.uk Gave us:

I agree with this. I hate Al wiring as the connections are not gas tight, and heat more than copper nodes do.
I have also seen many folks die in Al wired commercial establishments. The AL was not the immediate culprit. loose, improperly install unions were. However, copper unions sporting the same issues don't heat up as much, and would likely have never generated the fatal problem.
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On 6 Feb 2006 23:47:50 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.co.uk Gave us:

Yes, and ALL nodes being very tight is paramount.
Running an all copper refit will improve the house value, and be safer and better, however.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.co.uk wrote:

The best information I have seen on making aluminum wire branch circuit connections and fixing old installations is at: http://www.inspect-ny.com/aluminum/alreduce.htm It is based extensive research, primarily for the Consumer Product Safety Commission, which looked at causes of failures of aluminum connections. The paper gives detailed procedures for making different kinds of connections and also other advice. A common theme is that aluminum oxide is a major cause of failure and aluminum wires should have antioxide paste applied then the wire abraded to remove oxides before making a connection. The author specifically does not like the Ideal #65 wire nut which, as far as I know, is the only wire nut that has been UL listed for aluminum wire.
Aluminum oxide, an insulator, forms very rapidly on a clean aluminum surface. Its formation is produced by the high reactivity of aluminum, not aluminum to other metal contact.
Devices for aluminum wire are marked CO/ALR.
bud--
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Correct...you do not solder wire before it goes into a crimped connector...but you do after it goes into a solder socket connector and there are crimped connectors made to be soldered as well of course.
. In corrosive environments, stranded wire will corrode into the crimmped terminal and around the wire, insulating the wire from the terminal slightly causing it to burn, then fail.. thats common.
Accordingly battery cable manufacturers most often solder their wire into the crimped terminal ends.
This practice is seen pervasively in marine environments on both low amperage control circuits, and on power circuits.
Use of solder on power circuit terminals however has many problems, namely the solder melting out of the joint if the wire warms too much...and extrusion of the solder under compressive stress if screw connectors are used.. the military specs some are referring to cover that aspect... but not the other aspects.
Use of solder in an already crimped terminal serves to increase the electrical contact area, thats good, and to preclude corrosive gases, vapors and oils from the joint (by wicking up the bare wire).... that is seen commonly be the cause of failure in those situations.
For the last 100 years... and currently.... most if not all controls systems and component manufacturers dip wire ends in solder that are to be fit under screw head connectors... the practice is at least 90% common.... thats with *control circuits.
The practice is not common with power circuits for the reasons mentioned but is still seen in some situations (primarily corrosive environments... anyone can purchase NEC approved soldered connectors of course for those purposes... those are also pervasively common, especially in the electronics industry.)
Phil Scott Mechanical/ Electrical engineer and industrial controls contractor since 1852 (I'm very old)

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On Fri, 10 Feb 2006 12:56:19 -0800, "Phil Scott"

Nope. There are solder cup connectors that DO get soldered, and there are crimp type connectors. Find ONE crimp style connector that is meant, by design to be soldered. CITE!
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Those in the link you snipped.... any crimped connector can be soldered or not soldered.. they are not specifically designed to be soldered... but are solderable, and in many corrosive environments are soldered to keep the wire from corroding inside the crimp.
If you want the links refer to most my posts you chose to snip or new threads Ive begun on the subject.
Phil Scott
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On Fri, 10 Feb 2006 15:23:09 -0800, "Phil Scott"

NOT TRUE! Stop spreading FUD, you fucking retard.

OMG, the first thing you have said that is true!

Wrong.
If the environment is corrosive, then the parts need to be different. Got clue?

Your link was lame, dipshit.
This is ALL that applies in your touted industrial setting:
IPC/WHMA-A-620
Whenever there is a soldered connection, ther must also be a cable clamp right near it. You need a clamp around your neck. With you, it would likely help. As it stands right now, your lifelong acquired brain death doesn't cut it.
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On Fri, 10 Feb 2006 12:56:19 -0800, "Phil Scott"
Why did you cut and paste the same tired old CRAP several times?
ONCE is enough, chucko.
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Roy... you have been a combination of nasty, abusive and ignorant.... you can do better. At this point the issues of soldered connections has been fully covered in the links provided... you have made your abusive and ignorant nature fully evident.
Not too many people Roy will be interested in further association with you... again there are new threads on this issue, with links and my existing posts with links on all of these issues. Your spinning and screaming is only making you look bad.
better that you understand no one knows everything...and that this is merely one tiny area that you were unfamiliar with and could or still can easily learn the new information instead of defending your fly spec of error...we all err... it is defending our error that ruins us.
If you spin your head around so that in your mind you are justified with all the vile language etc, you will have rationalized your own insanity and that will ruin your entire life and that of anyone connected with you. Bad mistakes Roy...
you have a chance to see that and maybe just let it drop...and do things differently in the future...your entire life will improve if you do..and if you study up on industrial electrical issues your income could easily double or triple.
Phil Scott
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