Does coating stranded copper wire with solder cause any issues or break any codes?

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Their appearance varies from maker to maker. Most have an insulating sleeve on them, but they can be bought without it as well.
Screw terminals that have a removable screw can have "ring lugs" used on them. Screw terminals that have a "captivated" screw need a "spade lug" used on them. The type with the forked, open front section. Clamp lugs can use bare wire, or a "pin lug" for assemblies that cannot have wire shards around.
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Screw terminals that have a "captivated" screw need a

By far my favorite line from this knave.
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On Sat, 04 Feb 2006 02:57:22 GMT, "Long Ranger"

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Wow, you sure told him off, Numby.
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I can tell you off now, if you really want.

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Hey Dark Matter, You sure told him!
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You still should not blob the end of the wire or you'd lose surface area and increase heat. Tinning strands leads to creep problems, which was an enlightneing thing to read in here.
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Crimp terminals are designed to work on stranded wire without a solder backfill or pre-tinned wire of any kind. Of course this does not include wires manufactured with tinned strands. The bundle of wire needs to be a bundle where all the strands are NOT melded together. The whole key to a gas tight crimped fitting relies on this form of malleability. This is why crimping onto a single solid strand is less reliable from the industry's POV.
AFAIR that is a mil spec. There are several reasons.
One is that 8 out of ten solderers has very cursory skills at it. It is hard enough getting them to solder a standard through hole lead in place correctly. That is why mil spec has such numerous inspection steps.
When tinning the end of a stranded wire, the entire "hot" portion of the operation only lasts a couple seconds. If one tins for too long, or at too hot a temperature, the solder leaches (see capillary attraction) up the wire, stiffening the wire over a half an inch up its length.
It requires long learned repetitive skills to tin properly, and the first person in here that trivializes it is one of the eight out of ten, I guarantee it.
Another reason is, of course, solder creep.
Adding solder to a crimped connector AFTER it has been placed on the wire is the least mutative, most integrated method, but it is still unacceptable, IIRC.
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Soldering Aluminum is not easy to start with, and requires special solders and usually higher temperatures.
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My question has actually nothing to do with aluminum wiring ... it's just the research I've been doing on aluminum wiring that made me wonder about solder and copper wiring. Sorry if that confused anyone.
Thanks, Harry
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First, I do not have a copy of the current Canadian Electrical Code. I would call a Provincial or local building official for a proper answer. But in the USA.... Using solder on stranded building wire used in building electrical systems is not a normal trade practice. First, it is not economical, and secondly, there are too many different methods and materials that can be used to solder. Soldering can be more damaging than helpful if not done properly. For instance wicking can cause wires to become brittle and permit breakage. There are many alloys of solder some requiring the use of resin core others the use of acid for soldering. Soldering, in short, introduces a whole range of variables that cannot be controlled in the field. But the main reason it is not done is it simply takes too much time and is not necessary. For splicing, wire nuts are commonly used. For terminations, buy receptacles and switches that are listed for use with stranded wire. If you have to use solid wire for terminations, then attach a pigtail then wire nut the solid wire to the stranded wire. Better yet, replace the stranded wire with solid. The NEC Section requiring that the listing instructions be followed is 110.3(B). This has been in the (USA) National Electrical Code for as long as I can remember.
References:

110.3(B) Installation and Use. Listed or labeled equipment shall be installed and used in accordance with any instructions included in the listing or labeling.
110.14 Electrical Connections. Because of different characteristics of dissimilar metals, devices such as pressure terminal or pressure splicing connectors and soldering lugs shall be identified for the material of the conductor and shall be properly installed and used. Conductors of dissimilar metals shall not be intermixed in a terminal or splicing connector where physical contact occurs between dissimilar conductors (such as copper and aluminum, copper and copper-clad aluminum, or aluminum and copper-clad aluminum), unless the device is identified for the purpose and conditions of use. Materials such as solder, fluxes, inhibitors, and compounds, where employed, shall be suitable for the use and shall be of a type that will not adversely affect the conductors, installation, or equipment. FPN: Many terminations and equipment are marked with a tightening torque. (A) Terminals. Connection of conductors to terminal parts shall ensure a thoroughly good connection without damaging the conductors and shall be made by means of pressure connectors (including set-screw type), solder lugs, or splices to flexible leads. Connection by means of wire-binding screws or studs and nuts that have upturned lugs or the equivalent shall be permitted for 10 AWG or smaller conductors. Terminals for more than one conductor and terminals used to connect aluminum shall be so identified.
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Thanks for the post, 'lec', that's good info.
: First, I do not have a copy of the current Canadian Electrical Code. I : would call a Provincial or local building official for a proper answer. : But in the USA.... : Using solder on stranded building wire used in building electrical : systems is not a normal trade practice. First, it is not economical, : and secondly, there are too many different methods and materials that : can be used to solder. Soldering can be more damaging than helpful if : not done properly. For instance wicking can cause wires to become : brittle and permit breakage. There are many alloys of solder some : requiring the use of resin core others the use of acid for soldering. : Soldering, in short, introduces a whole range of variables that cannot : be controlled in the field. But the main reason it is not done is it : simply takes too much time and is not necessary. For splicing, wire : nuts are commonly used. For terminations, buy receptacles and switches : that are listed for use with stranded wire. If you have to use solid : wire for terminations, then attach a pigtail then wire nut the solid : wire to the stranded wire. Better yet, replace the stranded wire with : solid. The NEC Section requiring that the listing instructions be : followed is 110.3(B). This has been in the (USA) National Electrical : Code for as long as I can remember. : : References: : >From the 2005 NEC : : 110.3(B) Installation and Use. Listed or labeled equipment : shall be installed and used in accordance with any instructions : included in the listing or labeling. : : 110.14 Electrical Connections. Because of different characteristics : of dissimilar metals, devices such as pressure : terminal or pressure splicing connectors and soldering lugs : shall be identified for the material of the conductor and : shall be properly installed and used. Conductors of dissimilar : metals shall not be intermixed in a terminal or splicing : connector where physical contact occurs between dissimilar : conductors (such as copper and aluminum, copper and : copper-clad aluminum, or aluminum and copper-clad aluminum), : unless the device is identified for the purpose and : conditions of use. Materials such as solder, fluxes, inhibitors, : and compounds, where employed, shall be suitable for : the use and shall be of a type that will not adversely affect : the conductors, installation, or equipment. : FPN: Many terminations and equipment are marked with : a tightening torque. : (A) Terminals. Connection of conductors to terminal parts : shall ensure a thoroughly good connection without damaging : the conductors and shall be made by means of pressure connectors : (including set-screw type), solder lugs, or splices to : flexible leads. Connection by means of wire-binding screws or : studs and nuts that have upturned lugs or the equivalent shall : be permitted for 10 AWG or smaller conductors. : Terminals for more than one conductor and terminals : used to connect aluminum shall be so identified. :
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Yeah, it essentially states that you are wrong.
Oh yeah, the TOFU was retarded as well.
Don't know what TOFU is?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Top-post
about a third of the way down...
http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc1855.txt
So on top of being a miffed idiot because someone pointed out how wrong you were, you also are a retard about Usenet posting protocols and conventions. Why am I not surprised?
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Ed. note: this is a top-posted reply solely because it causes immediate Numby Genius meltdown.

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You have bored me stupid.
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On Sun, 5 Feb 2006 15:17:30 -0000, "Billy H"

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absolutely correct in almost all applications including large commercial applications.
In industrial and marine applications and of course with electronics the practice is common and on corrosive environments, necessary.
here are some links
220,000 hits... lots of good articles on the first page. http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=Crimped+and+soldered+wire+connectors&btnG=Google+Search
There is a time and a place to solder crimped or non crimped terminals and bare wire ends to be fit under a screw head.... and a time when that is not a good idea (hot running situations, although Ive seen pure silver or brassed connections in those locations)
Phil Scott

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Copper wires melt at a higher temperature to any solde you may use.
If there is a lot of heat generated in the circuitry you could melt the solder.
The orders of magnitude of *linear* expansion of the metals you refer to
Aluminium (pure) alpha = 23*10^-6 (20 at 200K, 23.2 at 300K, 24.9 at 400K, 26.4 at 500K, 28.3 600, 33.8 at 800K you could graph it from that)
Copper (pure) alpha = 13.7 *10^-6 (15.1 at 200K, 16.8, 17.7, 18.3, 18.9, 20 at 800K)
per deltaKelvin.
melting point Al= 933K, Cu56.
if you find the data for the solder you use you can calculate your expansion characteristics (absolute and relative) and also check to see if your solder will melt.
Using the data for the thermo-electric effects and the dimensions of the lines inquestion you cna calculate the heat evolved by the current in the lines, terminals and all.
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On Sun, 5 Feb 2006 13:56:21 -0000, "Billy H"

Bullshit Copper has a higher melt point temperature than any solder you may use. You MIGHT have been attempting to refer to the insulation on SOME types of wire. If so, you failed miserably.

Odd statement there. If there is that much heat generated at a connection node, the wiring installation has much more deeper seated problems than melted solder.

Jeez, you are so far off base. It is truly pathetic. Solder creep has to do with physical, mechanical stress, not temperature.

The heat in ANY properly installed circuit will never reach the melting point of ANY metal used in the industry.
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