Does coating stranded copper wire with solder cause any issues or break any codes?

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Unlike yourself. You ARE dirty every morning, noon, and night.
Your stalking baby bullshit proves it.
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On Mon, 06 Feb 2006 02:18:51 +0000, Roy L. Fuchs wrote:

Nope, I always take a shower after trying to teach you something about engineering. Actually I don't care a shit for you, but others deserve better.

Stalking? You are some fuk'n pot.
--
Keith

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... : : Otherwise, you aren't any better than anyone else, and particularly : not any better than anyone you deride here.
Well, I dunno 'bout that: if you're included, then he's certainly better than you, that's a given. Fuchsy is a closed mind with a large bowel, I'm afraid. Nuff said
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Gave us:

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well ...maybe Fuchsie is a closed mind etc... or maybe he is a romex wiring house type electrician... there are about 200 of those for everyone doing industrial contols and automation (where soldering stranded ends is pervasively common).
So...we get on the ng, this 200 to 1 ratio of insightability. Im sure Roy will respond appropriately to my posts on the topic... gentleman that he is, and realizing that the way to become an idiot is to defend ones current position...
As a consulting engineer the first thing I tell my clients is that they know more about their situation in many aspects than I do, and that I will be learning from them and formatting much or most of my recommendations based on what they know and have learned about their systems.. that works...and I am not then immune to learning myself.
. In corrosive environments, stranded wire will corrode into the crimmped terminal and around the wire, insulating the wire from the terminal slightly causing it to burn, then fail.. thats common.
Accordingly battery cable manufacturers most often solder their wire into the crimped terminal ends.
This practice is seen pervasively in marine environments on both low amperage control circuits, and on power circuits.
Use of solder on power circuit terminals however has many problems, namely the solder melting out of the joint if the wire warms too much...and extrusion of the solder under compressive stress if screw connectors are used.. the military specs some are referring to cover that aspect... but not the other aspects.
Use of solder in an already crimped terminal serves to increase the electrical contact area, thats good, and to preclude corrosive gases, vapors and oils from the joint (by wicking up the bare wire).... that is seen commonly be the cause of failure in those situations.
For the last 100 years... and currently.... most if not all controls systems and component manufacturers dip wire ends in solder that are to be fit under screw head connectors... the practice is at least 90% common.... thats with *control circuits.
The practice is not common with power circuits for the reasons mentioned but is still seen in some situations (primarily corrosive environments... anyone can purchase NEC approved soldered connectors of course for those purposes... those are also pervasively common, especially in the electronics industry.)
.
220,000 hits... lots of good articles on the first page. http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=Crimped+and+soldered+wire+connectors&btnG=Google+Search
There is a time and a place to solder crimped or non crimped terminals and bare wire ends to be fit under a screw head.... and a time when that is not a good idea (hot running situations, although Ive seen pure silver or brassed connections in those locations)
Phil Scott Mechanical/ Electrical engineer and industrial controls contractor since 1852 (I'm very old)

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On Fri, 10 Feb 2006 13:23:15 -0800, "Phil Scott"

Goddamned cut and paste retard!
Just so you know, in many circles what you did is considered SPAM.
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Dang Roy... abusive language and a failure to address the issues is not doing yer cause any good... can you address those. Others will be you know.
Soldering crimped connections is standard in many aspects of industrial wiring... I just posted the technical links.
Phil Scott
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On Fri, 10 Feb 2006 15:00:03 -0800, "Phil Scott"

You're an idiot.

No, you retarded twit, you pasted the same shit into several posts. You are about one of the most retarded Usenet posters going. BONE UP, dipshit!
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wrote in message Gave us:

Maybe our friend Roy will.
. In corrosive environments, stranded wire will corrode into the crimmped terminal and around the wire, insulating the wire from the terminal slightly causing it to burn, then fail.. thats common.
Accordingly battery cable manufacturers most often solder their wire into the crimped terminal ends.
This practice is seen pervasively in marine environments on both low amperage control circuits, and on power circuits.
Use of solder on power circuit terminals however has many problems, namely the solder melting out of the joint if the wire warms too much...and extrusion of the solder under compressive stress if screw connectors are used.. the military specs some are referring to cover that aspect... but not the other aspects.
Use of solder in an already crimped terminal serves to increase the electrical contact area, thats good, and to preclude corrosive gases, vapors and oils from the joint (by wicking up the bare wire).... that is seen commonly be the cause of failure in those situations.
For the last 100 years... and currently.... most if not all controls systems and component manufacturers dip wire ends in solder that are to be fit under screw head connectors... the practice is at least 90% common.... thats with *control circuits.
The practice is not common with power circuits for the reasons mentioned but is still seen in some situations (primarily corrosive environments... anyone can purchase NEC approved soldered connectors of course for those purposes... those are also pervasively common, especially in the electronics industry.)
.
220,000 hits... lots of good articles on the first page. http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=Crimped+and+soldered+wire+connectors&btnG=Google+Search
There is a time and a place to solder crimped or non crimped terminals and bare wire ends to be fit under a screw head.... and a time when that is not a good idea (hot running situations, although Ive seen pure silver or brassed connections in those locations)
Phil Scott Mechanical/ Electrical engineer and industrial controls contractor since 1852 (I'm very old)

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On Fri, 10 Feb 2006 13:18:17 -0800, "Phil Scott"

Fuck you , retard! You have now posted the SAME cut and paste CRAP seven times or more. You need to bone up on Usenet, you retarded fuck!
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errrr Roy? You are labling yourself badly with such language, then refuse to address the issues, not impressive.
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Some people don't know any better. We must pity them.

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If you *get inside* a soldered or tinned end and think of the strands, how the electricity actually *moves* then the concept begins to open up. Electricity travels on the surface of the circuitry. For wires the area of travel is the surface area of the cable, Length*Pi*diameter. Adding solder changes the surface areas and if you blob the terminal rather than tin the strands you change the surface area of the wire and hence the physical characteristics of the cable.
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On Sun, 5 Feb 2006 14:28:48 -0000, "Billy H"

No, it does not. High frequency AC current moves the travel toward the surface, but low frequency AC and DC does not.

Where are you getting this crap? Skin depth at 60Hz is huge.

You are trying to get too deep into a mechanical structure here.
The term "blob" also has little technical depth. The tinning action of a metal by tin lead solder is called "wetting". The "blob" you refer to would be called a "dry solder joint" where the wetting action failed to take place. Still a rather inappropriate term to use here.
Wetting itself is the result of the action of the solder flux. It de-oxidizes the metals on the surfaces involved, and allows the molten solder to make a cohesive "inter-metallic" bond with them. The wetting action then works by the physical mechanism known as "capillary attraction". The surface tension of the molten solder alloy gives the final solder joint its shape. Any REAL soldering personage can tell by the appearance of this finished solder joint whether or not it was done properly. The REAL soldering inspector can tell at a mere glance.
So, even the use of the term "coating" in the topic header is incorrect. It leans toward the description of a failed solder joint. A good solder joint has an integrated appearance.
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But reduced area for the electricity to run along all the same.
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wrote in message

Thats interesting... and at the least reasonably valid possibly. Id like to hear more about that.
in the controls business of course the amperage very small so thats not an issue and we can solder the ends of the wire.
The idea you present on current flow being possibly less at a soldered in connection would make a good google search.... If I find anything on that I will post it.
Here is what I have so far though. but that could and may well be all related to electronics or control circuits...
. In corrosive environments, stranded wire will corrode into the crimmped terminal and around the wire, insulating the wire from the terminal slightly causing it to burn, then fail.. thats common.
Accordingly battery cable manufacturers most often solder their wire into the crimped terminal ends.
This practice is seen pervasively in marine environments on both low amperage control circuits, and on power circuits.
Use of solder on power circuit terminals however has many problems, namely the solder melting out of the joint if the wire warms too much...and extrusion of the solder under compressive stress if screw connectors are used.. the military specs some are referring to cover that aspect... but not the other aspects.
Use of solder in an already crimped terminal serves to increase the electrical contact area, thats good, and to preclude corrosive gases, vapors and oils from the joint (by wicking up the bare wire).... that is seen commonly be the cause of failure in those situations.
For the last 100 years... and currently.... most if not all controls systems and component manufacturers dip wire ends in solder that are to be fit under screw head connectors... the practice is at least 90% common.... thats with *control circuits.
The practice is not common with power circuits for the reasons mentioned but is still seen in some situations (primarily corrosive environments... anyone can purchase NEC approved soldered connectors of course for those purposes... those are also pervasively common, especially in the electronics industry.)
.
220,000 hits... lots of good articles on the first page. http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=Crimped+and+soldered+wire+connectors&btnG=Google+Search
There is a time and a place to solder crimped or non crimped terminals and bare wire ends to be fit under a screw head.... and a time when that is not a good idea (hot running situations, although Ive seen pure silver or brassed connections in those locations)
Phil Scott Mechanical/ Electrical engineer and industrial controls contractor since 1852 (I'm very old)

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I totally agree with you, however Roy Boy does not.

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Roy has some other issues going on.. some who do only houses, with romex etc are unaware of the high end issues. that seems to be his situation. With the kind of approach Roy shows to life he wouldnt do well in the high end markets... if he cleaned that up though and studies some, he could probably double his wage by learning something about controls and industrial applications.
Phil Scott

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=Crimped+and+soldered+wire+connectors&btnG=Google+Search
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On Fri, 10 Feb 2006 15:06:13 -0800, "Phil Scott"

You are about as retarded as it gets, boy.
You are not only insulting electricians, but you think that I am one of them.
I have been working in manufacturing, in the electronics industry for 28 years, you stupid, retarded bastard. Mainly in military, space, medical, and industrial applications, so you can go fuck yourself... oh that's right... you just did.

Said the total retard that thinks "electrons travel on the wire surface" and "stranded wire has a higher ampacity than the same size solid wire because it has more surface area"
It is you that needs to get a clue, dipshit Phil.
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I didnt say that... someone else posited the notion when asserting that soldering stranded wire into a terminal would reduce its ampacity for that reason... I merely noticed that the NEC didnt have a different rating for stranded or solid wire of the same alloy etc. even though the stranded had a greater surface area...which was the point of this persons remark.
Roy.... your behavior, trashing and spin is doing you imensely more damage than those you target, and it is doing more harm to those around you than anyone else... you are a carrier of dis-ease. ..your behavior is abusive, not the mark of a sentient person.... and the entire NG notices that....
We have posted good links and you have ignored them, chosen to spin and issue abuse, this speaks to your own lack of self respect... you have marked yourself, and its not with a badge of honor or decency..
That will not work out well for you or anyone close to you over time.
Now Roy .. I will have to leave you to your own devices.
Phil Scott

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