Does Bleach Really Kill Mold?

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http://livinglifeforce.tripod.com/mold.html
<<Laundry bleach is not an effective mold killing agent for wood-based building materials and NOT EFFECTIVE in the mold remediation process. OSHA is the first federal agency to announce a departure from the use of chlorine bleach in mold remediation. In time, other federal, state and other public safety agencies are expected to follow OSHA's lead. The public should be aware, however, that a chlorine bleach solution IS an effective sanitizing product that kills mold on hard non porous surfaces and neutralizes indoor mold allergens that trigger allergies.>>
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I'd be interested to know why chlorine bleach has suddenly become ineffective in the control of mold, particularly since it's been used quite effectively for over a century in the food industry. I worked in canneries waaay back in my youth and industrial strength chlorine bleach (definitely NOT yer mother's Clorox) was our main mojo. Even on wood, it kept mold at levels that killed all food toxins.
We'd run those food lines 3 shifts per day for 6 days per week. On Sunday, those who wanted overtime came in and knocked down the mold on the processing lines. I'm talking long strands of slime hanging off the food conveyor belts which had been growing for a week. I'd knock off the big slime and mold with a 50 psi pressure washer and legions of bucket/brush carrying workers would follow up with this burn-yer-eyeballs-outta-yer-skull strength bleach. Even the pine 2X4s covering the waste drains were deslimed and bleached. Why has this now suddenly been rendered non-effective? Is bleach now really not working or did some slimey chem company with a lotta lobbyists come out with a new sanitizer that's gonna save the industry and it needs the feds to turn the tide in their favor. Or has all our toxic chems created a new super-mold that renders chlorine bleach impotent? Seriously.
nb
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Mold?:

It's cheap, safe, effective and easy to use. Professional mold-treatment companies hate that, so their Washington lobby is pressuring the feds to switch to something that can only be applied by licensed professionals. This is the prelude.
We've seen it work this way before.
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I alluded to same. The only diff is the instigating faction. No surprise whatsoever.
nb
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Think: FREON. If it works, someone will ban it.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .

It's cheap, safe, effective and easy to use. Professional mold-treatment companies hate that, so their Washington lobby is pressuring the feds to switch to something that can only be applied by licensed professionals. This is the prelude.
We've seen it work this way before.
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On Wed, 13 Mar 2013 19:26:34 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"
Think about work itself. Obama is doing everything he can to ban it.
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wrote:

Bleach (and other chemicals) kill mold. However some dead mold can still cause physical reactions in people.
Even if you do kill the mold you have to remove all traces of the residue.
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First hit on startpage search: http://www.certifiedmoldstrategies.com/nobleach.htm
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
I'd be interested to know why chlorine bleach has suddenly become ineffective in the control of mold, particularly since it's been used quite effectively for over a century in the food industry. I worked in canneries waaay back in my youth and industrial strength chlorine bleach (definitely NOT yer mother's Clorox) was our main mojo. Even on wood, it kept mold at levels that killed all food toxins.
We'd run those food lines 3 shifts per day for 6 days per week. On Sunday, those who wanted overtime came in and knocked down the mold on the processing lines. I'm talking long strands of slime hanging off the food conveyor belts which had been growing for a week. I'd knock off the big slime and mold with a 50 psi pressure washer and legions of bucket/brush carrying workers would follow up with this burn-yer-eyeballs-outta-yer-skull strength bleach. Even the pine 2X4s covering the waste drains were deslimed and bleached. Why has this now suddenly been rendered non-effective? Is bleach now really not working or did some slimey chem company with a lotta lobbyists come out with a new sanitizer that's gonna save the industry and it needs the feds to turn the tide in their favor. Or has all our toxic chems created a new super-mold that renders chlorine bleach impotent? Seriously.
nb
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On 3/13/2013 8:48 AM, Robert Green wrote:

This false claim is contradicted by the the following statement:

So yeah, bleach kills mold. However, it can damage porous materials, and improper use, especially in confined spaces, can be hazardous. OSHA makes the point that disposing of soaked porous materials is generally the best solution, and mold can be cleaned off hard-surfaced materials with any cleaning solution, including soapy water. Therefore, the use of bleach isn't required. That's not the same as saying it is ineffective.
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So can the stuff you use to clean soap scum outta yer tub, not to mention stepping off yer front porch.
Starting to sound like the insurance industry has their meddling fingers in this.
nb
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in

It's a matter of degree.
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OSHA

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YES!!! and very instantaneously.
You can even wash mold off bread or cheese. However, with porous surfaces like edibles, or wood; the mycelium goes a LONG way down inside. So, washing with bleach kills, ...but not completely. Plus, and here's the real downside, the carrier of sodium hypochlorite is WATER. So you've just dampened a moldy surface, better dry it quickly.
Bleach is so active that it will even break up virii molecules. Therefore, Veterinarians, between patients when confronted with unknown epidemics, traditionally wash down their examining tables with bleach and even dunk their hands into a tub of bleach...a big OW if you've ever done that all day long. There are less caustic chemicals available now, but it is my understanding that bleach is still the most reliable method of sanitizing. It's kind of like burning, without the flame.
By the way, my grandfather, who worked in heavy chlorine environments at a water preparation plant once told me the antidote for excessive chlorine exposure is caffeine (?) I always questioned that especially after I was 'overexposed during a mold remediation process. I opted for cream/mil products to make the mucosa tissues activate. Worked better for me.
As to why the sudden interest in removing bleach [which quickly deteriorates with time] from use, is unknown to me. Like, trying to get the industry to quit bleaching paper products even with recycled paper. SAY WHAT?! Hey, I use paper products during food preparation. I want that stuff clean as possible.
Any theories as to why the sudden attempt to dismiss bleach, remove it from the shelves?
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OSHA

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The problem with bleach is that it is neutralised by virtually any organic substance. So often it is neutralised before it can penetrate things such as textiles. Also whatever is to be disinfected, has to be cleaned first.
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On 3/13/2013 7:48 AM, Robert Green wrote:

Collected FUD from the "Living Life Force Institute" "a group of like-minded alternative healthcare practitioners"
Among the wisdom: "Chlorine is a key component of DIOXIN" It is also a key component of table salt.
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So is sodium.... Dirt is a key component of steel bridges.... Water is a key component of bourbon. Urine contains key components of fertilizer... Obama is a key component of socialism. Metal is a key component of bullets.....
... Big Damn Deal
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. OSHA

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LOL, good find! How about this one:
"What potential mold 'killing' power chlorine bleach might have, is diminished significantly as the bleach sits in warehouses, on grocery store shelves or inside your home or business 50% loss in killing power in just the first 90 days inside a never opened jug or container. Chlorine constantly escapes through the plastic walls of its containers. "
I guess all the pools that use liquid chlorine are unsafe because the chlorine isn't any good and incapable of disinfecting a swimming pool. Yet a gallon or two poured into a 30,000 gallon pool establishes a level sufficient to kill germs in pools, consistent with all pool authority water standards. And that you measure the active chlorine with a test kit and see it shows that the chlorine is there.
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Most of the chlorine now says concentrated. How much ? I wonder if you can tell by the color poured in a beaker. I'm going to look, cause I'm using some in the drains.
Greg
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Comparing new bottle with old, the new was greener liquid.
Greg
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d

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Pointless.
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gregz wrote the following on 3/13/2013 4:10 PM (ET):

Clorox - 6.% sodium Hypochorite Clorox Clean-Up spray - 1.84 %

--
Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
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