Does anyone make a STURDY Tire Wrench

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Try a 3.8 liter TransSport. Or a Grand Caravan. Or a (Ford) Aerostar. There really isn't a car made today that is designed to be easily serviced. From ANY manufacturer. If you are talking Galaxy you are talking ANCIENT history.
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On Thu, 01 Jan 2015 16:36:32 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

On a Chevy, 307 engine, I had to loosen a motor mount on one side, jack the engine up a bit just to get one spark plug out/in. PITA.
I'll take my Fords - owner of previous Broncos (302 & 351 Windsor engine), My 1994 Bronco needs a cosmetic fix and a few repairs I can do myself. Can't find them in the junk yard :)
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What kind if Chevy? A Monza is the only Chevy I've ever had to loosen a mount on, and I've been wrenching sing 1968. Unless you had a really shitty set of headers on it or were changing the plugs with a monkey wrench.

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On Thu, 01 Jan 2015 19:57:39 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

IIRC a '68 Impala? Many years ago. I may be wrong on the model and year but I took the motor mount nut off the frame and then lifted the engine with a floor jack a bit - not damaging the oil pan.
Easy greasy
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well, there is enough space under the hood of a '68 impalla to camp in it, and nothing in the way of removing the plugs - they stick basically straight out about 8 inches from the upper control arms, between the 3 "horns" of the manifold. They have heat sheilds that can bark your knuckles if you are not carefull, and the motor mount bolt goes through the mount front to back.
I doubt from your description you ever changed the plugs on a Chevy V8
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On Thu, 01 Jan 2015 21:21:40 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I forget. Maybe it was a '67 Chevy 307 engine. Point being - installing one plug was difficult. Pissed me off! I did lift the engine a tad from the frame and motor mount. I still prefer my Fords.
You can doubt me all you like - no worry. My oldest Chevy was a '36 pick-up truck.
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You are just pulling it out your rear as ALL Chevy small block V8s from 1955 on to the early 80s were virtually the same. Some of the easiest engines/cars to work on ever made _ EXCEPT when they stuffed the 265 into the Vega/Monza body.
And my oldest Chevy was a 28 National sedan - Also had a 35 Master sedan. And a 67 Chevy Nova sedan. Also drove a 63 Impala SS for several months.
I also prefer my Fords. Currently own 1996 and 2002. Have only owned 4 fords previous to these 3
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On Thursday, January 1, 2015 11:52:49 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I have a Chevy Lumina. You have to loosen the motor mounts and tip the engine forward to get anywhere near the plugs on the back side.
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On Thu, 01 Jan 2015 23:52:35 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Call it what you like Clare. I'm not trying to convince you, just that _once_ I had to loosen a mount to get a plug in (307). Maybe it was a fluke, I don't know. Maybe I needed a different socket. I spent plenty of time trying to get the one plug started to not avail. It pissed me off so I jacked the engine ~ inch for some clearance. It was the ONLY time I ever had to do that.
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OK, you were putting the plug IN. I'll share a secret. Get yourself a piece of vacuum hose about 8 inches long and put it in your tool box. When you need to install a plug, put the hose on the end of the plug and use it to guide the plug into the hole and spin it to start it in the thread. You will never crossthread another plug, and it will save your knuckles and a lot of swearing - plus save you resorting to removing engine mounts. Your problem wasn't access, it was alighnment.
I use the same trick for removing plugs in tight quarters. Get the wrench on and break tt loose, then get the hose on and you don't have to reach the plug or swing the ratchet in an almost impossible spot.
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On Fri, 02 Jan 2015 17:09:03 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Nice tip. Thanks. In the case I mentioned I only loosened one mount to lift the engine on one side...did not remove it but got some clearance to get the plug started. Worked for me when I was 17 with many fewer tools.
I love it when people share "secret" nuggets to solve problems.
Got any for window regulator motors so I don't rip the hide off my arms in a door panel - where I can't see? <G>
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What make and model??
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When I was young, in my first job, and trying to learn how to do my own aut o repairs because I couldn't afford to pay somebody, I had a strategy.
It turned out the best garage in town was the dealer, and they were also th e highest priced. But they had more business than they knew what to do wit h, and didn't much care about mine. So I would get them to diagnose the pr oblem and sell me the parts. They made money on the parts, I'm sure they h ad plenty of markup in there, but my labor was free, they didn't usually ch arge shop time for a quick look, and their diagnosis and advice was a heck of a lot better than mine.
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On Fri, 02 Jan 2015 23:28:30 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

'94 Ford Bronco. I repaired one motor by replacing the nylon 'nubs' and used white lithium grease. Had to drill out rivets and replace them with nuts and bolts. PITA to use a ratchet on the inside of the interior door panel. I did by HF Thumbwheel Ratchets for the next motor fix, but I lost some hide and blood on the first repair :)
<http://www.harborfreight.com/3-piece-thumbwheel-ratchet-set-94011.html> <https://tinyurl.com/on9bgpq
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You just have to RIVET the darn things back in! There are "rivets" made that have a pin in them that you drive in to expand them that work pretty good if you don't have a heavy enough rivet puller.
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On Sat, 03 Jan 2015 21:01:00 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

The one single rivet wasn't the real problem. I 'doubled nuttered" a small bolt with a star washer to replace the rivet. Holds up very well. Two dimples in the interior door panel had to be drilled out to 1/2" to allow access to the bolt mounts for the regulator motor, as did the one rivet having to be drilled. The hide removal and blood letting is trying to mount the motor on the regulator inside the panel when you have to "feel" your way and can't see what is going on. Trying to get the motor gear line up. Now days they sure make it difficult on a DIY type person. The back window motor is the same, for the most part. PITA. I bought the thumb rackets after the first fix. Still have two motors to fix <sigh>
--
Somtimes you just have a bad day at the dungeon

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Would sure help if they used better punch presses when they punch the holes out of the sheet metal. Sometimes I think the auto companies use surplus equipment from Gillette!!!!
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca posted for all of us...

Where do you think Gillette gets the blades from? The scalpel makers get first divs, then Gillette, then Ginsu knives.
--
Tekkie

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Well, I used to be a died-in-the-wool Mopar man and Ford Hater. I still have a bit of a soft spot for Mopar - some would say it is somewhere in the middle of my skull but that's beside the point (and that wouldn't show if I combed my hair the other way!!) but I've taken a real liking to the Ford products. I had 2 Aerostars,a Pontiac Trans Sport then a PT Cruizer, and I'm now driving a Ranger. For my wife we had 2 Chryslers (LeBaron and New Yorker) then a Mystique and now the Taurus. The only one I'd likely never buy again was the Trans Sport. Try as hard as I could to like that vehicle, it still leaves a bad taste in my mouth. I liked the PT but it didn't really suit my requirements for a "truck" so I found someone who liked it enough to give me a reasonable price, and found my current Ranger at a price I couldn't turn down. The only problems my last 3 fords (before the current two) had were minor electrical glitches and some transmission maintenance - plus a bit of expected body rust -they were far from new vehicles even when I bought them. My current 2 have given virtually no problems in the 3 plus years I've owned them. One is 13 years old, the other 19, with 90 and 327 thousand killometers respectively., purchased with 54 and 307 thousand. The aftermarket ar-starter on the Taurus has had a couple minor issues, and I put U-Joints in the Ranger. Other than that, not even a light bulb. Both are virtually original except for front brakes, and on the Ranger, a clutch (installed when I bought it)
So I really have no complaints with either Mopar or Ford. The darn Pontiac on the other hand, was a painfull experience from beginning to end - with stupid little things acting up every time I turned around.
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Similar to my experience. I loved old mopar vehicles and despise Ford products. I've worked on both and the later has been a nightmare to work on for 50 yrs! My Honda Civic was so small, I hadda change out the starter motor by braille!! Yet, my full sized Ford E150 had a straight six in it and it was so difficult to change the no. 1 spark plug, I hadda take it to shop that had lil' Vietnamese working there that were small enought to even reach the no. 1 spark plug cable (which has a special 6" handle to grab)! Despite all my efforts and contortions, I couldn't even reach the cable's handle.
It was even worse was my Lincold Mk IV (pimp car!). Sucker had a hood long enough to hide an entire Honda Civic inside. But, when I had a pwr steering hose fail, I hadda change it out and replace it. Woulda been a piece of cake if Ford engineers had not routed the 1/8" steel brake lines outta the master cylinder right across the only working space around the left side of the 460CID V8. The coulda routed it down and across, which woulda given me all kindsa room, but nooooo! Hadda route that steel line straight outta the M/C right dead center into the middle of said open working space, then down, making removing the P/S hose a freakin' nightmare.
Thanks for nothing, Ford engineers! :|
nb
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