Does anyone make a STURDY Tire Wrench

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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I'll be in the market for a new set of shoes before the summer tires go back on. They're not down to the wear bars, but the bars seem very optimistic. I'm not impressed by the OEM Potenzas though so some shopping will be required.
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The cheap 4-way wrenches I had were fairly bendy too, but the main issue was their length. Each arm was only 6-8" or so and didn't provide much leverage. A 16" breaker bar makes easy work of a lug the 4-way wouldn't budge.
Add my 230 pounds to the end of that 16" bar and a stubborn lug doesn't stand a chance! :)

An extra bar would be handy but I've never gotten around to getting one. I just grab the one out of the trunk when I need it. Generally, lug nuts are the only thing I need it for anyway.

My used cars never came with wrenches or jacks either. I got my standard equipment screw jacks at the salvage yards. It doesn't take much to lift my 1976 VW Rabbit anyway. That said, I did have a bearing fail on a screw jack years ago and the car came crashing down. Scary. Thankfully there was no harm to me or the vehicle, but it taught me never to trust those jacks for anything more than an emergency tire repair. I use my floor jack and jack stands when the car is in the garage.

I've been thinking about picking up a cordless impact wrench, mostly for the speed than anything. Taking snow tires on and off twice a year can take a while. More of a luxury than something I really need. :)

The only thing I need the extra leverage of a pipe for is removing the axle nuts when changing drivelines or wheel bearings.
However, if you live in an area where the roads are salted each winter, you may have more issues with corrosion than I do.

I always carry a full size spare, even though I have only had one flat in 30+ years. I heard a noise while driving and pulled over to find a key sticking out of the tire. I don't know how a key ended up on the road or how it managed to poke into my tire, but I had the spare on in less than 10 minutes and was on my way.
Unfortunately, the tires on my utility trailer seem to blow out every year or two. They just degrade over time, crack, and fail. So, I always carry a spare trailer tire, and replace the tires every few years.

I still drive a 1976 Rabbit and at 51 I'm no spring chicken either. :) Anthony Watson www.mountainsoftware.com www.watsondiy.com
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On Thu, 25 Dec 2014 07:09:37 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

    Stand on one end while you use your pipe on the other end, or get someone to pull on the pipe while you stand. You might have to do some gymnastics till you get it right if you are alone, but then there will nobody watching. Giving the nut a few "jerks" in the wrong direction might loosen it. Try that.     It bends if force is applied on only one side. I have snapped a wrench, once. Bad material.     []'s
    Reference : changing tires for 40 years.
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On Sun, 28 Dec 2014 06:53:59 +0000 (UTC), HerHusband

My 4-way is 2 feet long, thick, and has no noticeable flex. You can't beat a 4-way for speed, as you can spin off the nuts fast. I've used short ones in the past, and had no trouble with them. When I carried my tools with me, I used a 1/2 breaker to break them, and a speed wrench to crank them off. The 1/2 breaker flexed more than any 4-way I've used, and the speeder is more work than a 4-way. The only downside of a good 4-way is the space it takes. I've kept my lugs oiled with 30 weight until the last 20 years, when I started using anti-seize. I still wire brush them occasionally. But honestly, I haven't had a flat in at least 15 years, so only take wheels off for brake jobs or suspension work. When flats were more common, I carried a 1 1/2 ton hydraulic jack in my trunk. More compact than most jacks, just heavier. Now I just carry the jacks the came with my cars, but carry the big 4-way for trips.
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snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com posted for all of us...

NAPA usually has better grade equipment.
You may wish to invest in a torque wrench so the nuts are tightened properly. I would also avoid where you had the car serviced or wheels were touched.
Depending on how much DIY you perform an impact wrench may be an investment.
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Tekkie® wrote:

I bought a Harbor Freight electric impact wrench specifically to remove a couple of damper tube bolts during a motorcycle fork project. It worked well and saved my bacon a couple of years later when I found The Hulk had torqued down the nuts on my new rims. It also came in handy to remove the sprocket nut that Suzuki installs with red Loctite.
High quality professional tool built for day in and day out use? Hell, no, but $50 well spent.
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On 12/28/2014 5:53 PM, rbowman wrote:

I've also gotten good services out of the electric impact wrench. First was Wel Bilt, and that broke. Since that time, I've had one or two HF, which do the job fairly well.
- . Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
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No longer.
I've shopped NAPA for over 40 yrs. Once an industry leader, now they're jes another crappy cheapo auto parts chain. All their tools are made in China, along with most everything else. You can't even buy windsheild wiper blade refills, anymore. Gotta buy the entire wiper blade assy. NAPA=CRAPA! ;)
nb
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wrote:

what auto supply store meets the grade these days?
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On Mon, 29 Dec 2014 08:54:08 -0800, "Pico Rico"

Well, I'm finding I can often buy OEM from the dealer for the same price or less than I'd pay for the crap at Napa or Parts Source or Car Quest - so I usually go to the dealer to start with.
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I usta go to the dealers. That is, until they started saving overhead by reducing parts invantory. Not all, but definitely Chrysler products. Last time I went to my Dodge dealer, they told me they no longer carried that part and recommended I try NAPA. So I was at the NAPA store and waiting in line with other customers and doing some grousing about dealers, when I noticed the guy I'd jes spoke to at the Dodge parts counter was in the back of the line I was standing in at the NAPA store. Ford seems to have all their parts, but at great cost. I don't like Fords.
nb
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On 12/30/2014 11:17 AM, notbob wrote: ...

Not sure if it's corporate or not; I presume it's all local dealership option of what they want to spend their $$ on but certainly the GM dealership here has virtually nothing on hand any more. It's exceedingly annoying that virtually no repair can be completed owing to them not having parts in stock so must wait for them on top of the other shop time.
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My local Napa store can usually have what I need next day. So can my Ford dealer. I've had better luck with the dealer actually having the part on hand for my older model Fords than Napa or Parts Source - and at as good or better price. I usually know pretty well what I am going to need before I get too deep into a job, so usually order the parts ahead
I do some work on friends' and family's cars as well and have found the same (actually have bought more parts for friends' cars than my own over the last 10 years) - Ford, Chrysler, Toyota, and others.
Oh, I forgot one repair I needed to do on the Taurus. The rear wheel bearings got noisy. I cheaped out and ordered the bearings on-line from parts discounters - first ones were no good - didn't fit, second were not the right ones, and the third set - from Rock Auto finally did the job at half dealer price. The first 2 were from different suppliers. For the hassle I went through I could have bought them locally and had the job done a week earlier. Live and learn, I suppose.
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On 12/30/2014 6:38 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote: ...

If doing one's self, that's generally so; the dealership waits until they've got it all torn down before ordering anything and since most dealerships will only install OEM parts and they don't keep much of anything in stock it's at _least_ the next day if not two whereas if were in stock could've been done that day.
Fortunately we have enough vehicles except for the one 4x4 with the field transport diesel tank that can do without any single one for a day or so but still it's a pain.
NAPA can generally get stuff overnight but we're far removed from large distribution centers out here so it's not guar-on-teed for certain, depending on what it is.

...
I'm to the age and I've done enough repair on enough that I'd never even consider taking on somebody else's at this point--with a dozen various vehicles from the cars thru the light-, medium- and heavy trucks not counting the tractors, combines, swather, etc., etc., as well all the other implements there's more than enough to keep me in all I care to/needs must do. I've gotten where except for the tractors and trucks larger than the light-duty it's quicker and as cheap to have them all done in town for even just oil/lube...
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Yes. The Ford dealership, here, is very good. If they don't have the part today, they'll have it, for sure, tomorrow.
nb
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On 12/31/2014 12:01 PM, notbob wrote:

Maybe, but it'll still be a Ford that day, too!!!! :(
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True dat! ....which is why I hate Fords and will never own another.
nb
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On 12/31/2014 1:29 PM, notbob wrote:

My Ford "hate" goes back to that we always had Chevy trucks on the farm going up...neighbor had Fords and while they did the job, inevitably every one of them was totally rusted out on bodies...and not just the light trucks but the grain trucks as well.
Had a '55 for a while in HS; it served the purpose of a school car. Managed to snag a '63 Impala 2D HT in '66 while in uni...another that I shoulda' kept as it's a classic collector's item now...
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On 12/31/2014 4:01 PM, dpb wrote: ...

...
Added to the period in which was doing online coal analyzer installation/support throughout the eastern KY/western VA/WVA coal region and driving rentals _a_lot_. Only thing could get thru corporate were the stinkin' Ford Taurus; the most awful handling and uncomfortable thing to drive on local windy mountain roads and absolute torture on the lower back...
Some have since improved since but the hate lingers...
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I always thought Fords were tough, I jes didn't like the way their engineer's brain's worked. It's like, if you're a home mechanic, Ford does everything it can to frustrate you. For example:
The transmission rod linkage to my Ford E150 was basically the same as on my Dodge van.... except! Whereas Dodge jes had a bent rod going thru a hole, Ford hadda add a little plastic collar to take up the slack between the hole and the rod, to make it --quieter?-- whatever. In my Dodge, took about two shakes to remove the cotter key and then the rod. The Ford? Howzabout the plastic used for the little collar turns diamond hard after a few yrs and the tool to remove said collar costs $70 from Ford! Hey, I'm a DIY'er. Outta my way!
Silly me. Took me and a hacksaw and an elect drill almost one hour to get that damn piece of plastic out. When I re-assembled, I merely left the plastic collar out. Worked fine.
Also, a Ford Galaxie is the only vehicle I've ever done a spark plug change on and come away from the job with bloody forearms.
That's why I hate Ford.
nb
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