Does anyone know what 'kind' of threads are on a typical portable gas can?

For reasons explained elsewhere, I would love to replace the 'spout' of about ten Blitz five-gallon plastic portable gasoline containers with a simple gas cap.
I called Blitz, who does not sell an alternative gas can spout - nor would they answer this question.
Do you know what 'threads' these cans use and what 'might' be used to replace the caps that would still handle the 22psi vapor pressure of gasoline & remain air & water tight?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/4/2011 5:52 PM, worker bee wrote:

Dumb ass gas cans such as this are mandated here. Real PITA to use and probably result in more gas spillage than old fashioned cans. When I needed a new can a few years ago, I learned that only the so called spill proof cans could be sold here. Doubt if manufacturer would sell you a spout to defeat the mechanism.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 04 Dec 2011 18:14:00 -0500, Frank wrote:

They won't. In fact, when I called Blitz, they couldn't understand 'why' anyone would 'want' to replace the spout.
If you've ever tried to pour five gallons of gas at about chest level, they'd understand why.
You have to use one hand constantly on the spout button (or else it closes), and the other hand has to be holding up the entire five gallon can at about your chest level to pour it out. In addition, you MUST add a hose to the end of the spout because it's too short to fit into any normal tank opening.
The only practical way to use the spout is to simply remove it. But what can I replace it with?
All I need is a cap that fits and holds 22 psi of vapor pressure.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The one I have...you unlock the spout, push the spout-in...and it stays open until you release the downwards pressure. I'm not sure if it's the same brand as yours'.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bee,
I'm pretty sure that the "blitz" is a USGI type fuel can. Look at fig. 1 in this pdf. and compare it to your cans. http://home.comcast.net/~sday77/binky/pdf/A-A-59592_Fuel_Can_Spec.pdf
Dave M.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 04 Dec 2011 18:40:40 -0500, Dave M. wrote:

I like that PDF. But it showed some weird things!
I thought it strange that the can only need handle 15 psi (since I'm told the vapor pressure of gasoline is 22 psi) but I guess it's close enough for government work.
Also, it seemed odd that a 'venting port' was allowed - since the whole point of the California gas cans is that there is no longer a separate venting port (it's in the spout now - but that makes the spout nearly useless as fuel flow is severely restricted).
However, the diagram of the threads seemed to be the wierdest feature.
1. At the top of the threaded neck, the diameter to the outside peak of the threads seems to be 3.400 inches (+- 0.030 inches). 2. Yet, the last thread of the threaded neck, 1.20 inches later, seems to enlarge that to 3.480 inches (+- 0.030 inches). 3. And, each thread seems to be 0.016 inches tall.
I wonder why they make the last thread bigger? Is it to make is super air tight? Wouldn't normal threads be just as air tight?
3. The pitch seems to be 1/4 inch between threads, comprised of a 0.100 inch (+- 0.20 inches) peak, and the rest is a funny shape of 10 degree and 32 degree angles.
Overall, that's a weird shape!
But at least we now know the shape.
I wonder if it has a specific name like most other threads do?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 4 Dec 2011 22:52:06 +0000 (UTC), worker bee

to make a plastic disc to take the place of the spout and seal very well to the top of the container.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Dec 4, 7:46pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

IIRC I have bought "Blitz" brand containers in the past, but don't have any anymore due to having to leave them behind every time I've moved (for some reason moving and storage companies don't like dealing with gas cans.) lIRC they came with such a disc, although likely it has been lost over the years. They probably won't sell you replacement spouts or discs now though because of the requirement for the annoying new style nozzles.
I bought an old surplus jerry can while I still could; I hope that I don't end up having to leave that behind.
nate
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Step 1: Play victim card.
That doesn't make any sense. At least one time you drove your car/s:
Newsgroups: alt.home.repair Subject: Re: Cross Country Moving? Date: Sat, 20 Feb 2010 09:04:06 -0500
"We drove the cars, because moving a car any significant distance tends to cost at least $1K ..." http://groups.google.com/group/alt.home.repair/msg/44d5a10c832d5adf?hl=en&dmode=source
No room in the trunk/s...?

That doesn't make any sense, either. Jerry cans aren't scarce...
Oh, wait... you must mean back when you could afford one... -----
- gpsman
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Non sequitur. Where did I say I was a victim of anything?

Didn't really want to carry gas cans in the same trunk with suitcases, coats, etc. - you know, the stuff you need immediately when you get to your destination. Plus a new gas can is what, $5? Makes far more sense to buy a new gas can at destination and not risk hundreds or thousands of dollars worth of clothes and other essentials.

I meant back before they became hard to get due to the new laws about gas can venting, just like I said.
nate
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
N8N wrote:

Not hard. There are almost 700 listings for jerry cans on Ebay right now (including parts like spouts and gaskets). http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_from=R40&_trksid=p5197.m570.l1313&_nkw=jerry+can&_sacat=See-All-Categories
Aside: Some are even free. About two years ago, while foraging through the neighborhood the night before heavy trash pickup, I spotted one. Zip, into the back of the truck.
I examined it when I got it home. Not only was is more than servicable, it had, stenciled on the bottom in fading white paint:
III Army SEP 44
It's possible my little can helped George Patton relieve the siege at Bastogne!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 06 Dec 2011 09:19:54 -0600, HeyBub wrote:

It's illegal for them to ship them to California.
I don't know about any other state though.
But you gave me an idea. I might be able to pick up those tall metal jerry cans at the army surplus store. I hear you can even pour them straight into the vehicle (or into a 55-gallon drum).
THAT would be an improvement over my siphoning transfer of fuel!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 04 Dec 2011 19:46:45 -0500, clare wrote:

You may be on to something here.
The threaded ring does spin separately from the spout itself.
So, I might be able to drill out the spout, to see if I can fit a disc inside yet still keep it air tight!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 04 Dec 2011 19:46:45 -0500, clare wrote:

Urgh, mine's like that and it never seems to seal properly.
I used to have a 5-gallon can which came with both a spout (threaded portion was part of the spout and not a separate ring) and a cap.
I've not seen one like that for a long time; maybe they stopped making them because too many people lost the spout while the cap was on (or vice versa).
Maybe I need to find another can like it and get creative with some gas- resistant glue, making myself a single-piece spout and a single-piece cap. cheers
Jules
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Well, you can't. CARB has made it illegal to sell anything but the CARB-compliant spouts to fit gas cans. Most other states have followed suit.
Even if you knew what thread it was, you couldn't legally obtain anything to fit it, except a replacement CARB-compliant spout.
The thread is a proprietary thread specific to Blitz's gas cans. I have a couple of Blitz cans, a few Sceptre cans, and one Harbor Freight special. All different threads.
The cap from one brand will cross-thread on to the others because they're close, but unless you use the original cap it leaks like a sieve.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 06 Dec 2011 07:52:53 -0800, dennisgauge wrote:

I haven't tried it so that is good information.
The Jerry Can Paper had a lot of good information. (http://www.survivalmonkey.com/portable-fuel-storage.html )
But it too excluded California: "California residents are no longer allowed to buy any of these jerry cans unless the corresponding spouts meet the new California Air Resources Board (CARB) spill-proof spouts."
Does that mean that if I do buy one of these Jerry cans, I'll have to have them ship it to another state?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

They cannot legally sell those cans to residents of CA, NY, any many other states that have CARB or CARB-like regulations on the books.
Like most people, I am simply happy to find a CARB-compliant spout that doesn't dribble gas. Slow? I don't care, as long as it doesn't dribble gas.
Tractor Supply has recently started carrying Scepter-brand gas cans. I bought one for $8 during their dollar days and so far so good.
If you can find the "No-Spill" brand cans, they're supposedly the best.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 04 Dec 2011 23:35:50 +0000, Red Green wrote:

It's not a preoccupation - it's simply a design problem.
Once every couple of months, I drive to the gas station and fill up ten five gallon cans of gasoline. Back at home, I siphon that gasoline into a 55-gallon drum. Then, for the next two months, I use that gasoline to fill two cars and various typical small engine motors. When needed, I return to the gas station, two months thereafter.
NONE of these operations requires the spout.
I simply use the spout as a cap. It's not a big deal but the spout is harder to remove and put back on than a simple cap would be simply because you can't grip it with your entire hand (because the spout is in the way).
So you can only grip it with the tip of your fingers. But it's on pretty tight (air and water tight).
So, it would be a bit easier if I simply replaced the spout with a cap.
Do you have any idea what the threads are and where we can get a cap? I'm sure I'm not the first person who wants to cap a gasoline can nowadays.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 07 Dec 2011 06:57:29 -0800, bob haller wrote:

That might work.
I'll go give it a try.
If it works, that suggestion is golden!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.