Does a capital ship sinking actually SUCK a swimmer down to drown?

Page 3 of 4  
Back then, the reason to get away from the sinking ships was not the suction but the boilers exploding.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dne 22/12/2015 v 07:06 O napsal(a):

I agree it is the best to get far from a wreck independently on if whirl sucking is a danger or not.
--
Poutnik ( the Czech word for a wanderer )

Knowledge makes great men humble, but small men arrogant.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dne 22/12/2015 v 01:04 M. Stradbury napsal(a):

I suppose there are many eye witnesses.
My not confirmed idea is,
that for very most time is sinking too slow to be dangerous in this way.
But in final stage, the one ship end is often submersed and the ship is sliding down fast, or the ships turns upside down, or horizontally positioned ship accelerates sinking toward the bottom.
In such scenario the motion is fast, causing vertical streams and vertigos.
--
Poutnik ( the Czech word for a wanderer )

Knowledge makes great men humble, but small men arrogant.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Per M. Stradbury:

Dunno what a capital ship is but am guessing it's big.
I saw an interview clip in which Lord Louis Mountbatten told of surviving his destroyer's sinking - along with a senior NCO who said at the time something like "Well sir, the scum always rises to the surface" so I am guessing that both were in the water when the ship went down under them.
--
Pete Cresswell

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 22 Dec 2015 08:53:14 -0500, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

My bad for not defining it, but you, sir, are correct, although in looking it up, I realized I was not correct:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capital_ship
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Per M. Stradbury:

Then I guess my little anecdote is moot because a destroyer looks much smaller than an aircraft carrier or battle ship...
--
Pete Cresswell

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 22 Dec 2015 11:41:02 -0500, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

What I had meant, in the OP, was "big ship" (not a life raft or tugboat, for example, which is what the MythBusters seem to have tested).
To "me", a destroyer qualifies as a 'big ship' (when it's sinking out from under you); but I was wrong in the definition since the Wikipedia article said a Capital ship is an "important" ship (so to speak).
What I meant though was a "big" ship (big enough to suck you so far down, if it's gonna suck you, that you'd drown before coming back up).
I think the most reliable things that came out of this quest so far were:
a) Mythbusters said busted - but they tested what amounts to a very "tiny" ship. b) People swim away for *lots* of reasons (all good) not the least of which are explosions, fire, oil slicks, rigging, falling objects, etc.
So, the mere fact they're taught to swim away doesn't really tell us whether or not they're sucked under at the time of sinking.
I don't actually know if we have a definitive answer that most of us would agree fits the typical definition of 'scientific' evidence yet, either way.
But the capital-air-bubbles-aren't-buoyant theory does sound plausible (it seems to me it would be easy to test with ants and toy ships or something).
I'll keep reading and looking and observing ... until we find out the answer.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dne 22/12/2015 v 22:50 M. Stradbury napsal(a):

Be aware of surface tension.
--
Poutnik ( the Czech word for a wanderer )

Knowledge makes great men humble, but small men arrogant.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related to the familiar word "sputnik"?
Mike.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dne 23/12/2015 v 00:07 MJC napsal(a):

sputnik had original meaning traveling companion, so yes.
http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=sputnik
sputnik (n.) Look up sputnik at Dictionary.com "artificial satellite," extended from the name of the one launched by the Soviet Union Oct. 4, 1957, from Russian sputnik "satellite," literally "traveling companion" (in this use short for sputnik zemlyi, "traveling companion of the Earth") from Old Church Slavonic supotiniku, from Russian so-, s- "with, together" + put' "path, way," from Old Church Slavonic poti, from PIE *pent- "to tread, go" (see find (v.)) + agent suffix -nik.
--
Poutnik ( the Czech word for a wanderer )

Knowledge makes great men humble, but small men arrogant.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
says...

How about "KAPUTNIK"? Which I first heard in the Coen Brothers' " Miller's Crossing" - do you know its meaning?
--
bg



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dne 23/12/2015 v 19:31 Robert Green napsal(a):

I do not think it has Slavic origin. It is probably related to kaput .
http://etymonline.com/index.php?allowed_in_frame=0&search=kaput
--
Poutnik ( the Czech word for a wanderer )

Knowledge makes great men humble, but small men arrogant.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 23 Dec 2015 13:31:36 -0500, "Robert Green"

It refers to the ill fated US Vanguard program where the US Navy tried to build a rocket to launch a satellite that was NOT an ICBM design Sputnik was circling the globe while Vanguard rockets were blowing up on the pad. They finally got it going after a few highly publicized failures on TV. In the mean time they dusted off a Redstone missile, painted NASA colors on it and lobbed one up there.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
M. Stradbury wrote:

If you can simulate ocean, not just a bath tub with water in it.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dne 23/12/2015 v 00:25 Tony Hwang napsal(a):

That is not needed but it is very difficult to maintain similarity.
--
Poutnik ( the Czech word for a wanderer )

Knowledge makes great men humble, but small men arrogant.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tuesday, December 22, 2015 at 8:53:20 AM UTC-5, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

This is a ship: ship
This is a capital ship: SHIP
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
DerbyDad03 posted for all of us...

What about UPS or FedEx, they Ship!
--
Tekkie

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/22/2015 10:33 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

An extra-large capital ship: SSHHIIPP
An extra-large capital ship that sprung a leak: SSHHIIPPpppppppppppppppp
--
2 days until the winter celebration (Friday December 25, 2015 12:00:00
AM for 1 day).
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
hah wrote: "An extra-large capital ship: SSHHIIPP "
Yeh, let's define the orig. post "capital ship".
Minimum 500' long, 30,000 gross registered tons? Or over 1,000' and 80,000GRT?
Titanic was 880'x92', 46,000GRT - rather narrow for her size, and mostly all hull - compared to the floating projects circling the Caribbean today. The fears of being sucked down with her proved unfounded.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/21/2015 07:04 PM, M. Stradbury wrote:

Yes. The main mechanism iirc is that air escaping from the sinking ship causes enough bubbles that the swimmer can't stay afloat, and sinks too deep to get back to the surface.
Cheers
Phil Hobbs
--
Dr Philip C D Hobbs
Principal Consultant
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.