Does a Bedroom require a Bed to be called a Bedroom?

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What is a Bedroom?
Does a Bedroom require a Bed to be called a Bedroom?
What if you remove the bed from a bedroom, what does that bedroom become? What do you call that room, once the bed is gone?
And what about people who dont use beds? Like those who sleep on a futon, or couch? These people dont have beds, so they cant have bedrooms in their home!
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Then too, why are the rooms that contain toilets in them, called Bathrooms in homes and Restrooms in public buildings? And, what about bathrooms that dont contain a bathtub or shower? By the way, does anyone really Rest in a Restroom? Most people just take a shit or piss and move on..... And "taking a shit" is really false wording. No one TAKES a shit..... They LEAVE a shit!!!
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On 08/31/16, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo said the following... Pa> What is a Bedroom? Pa> Pa> Does a Bedroom require a Bed to be called a Bedroom? Pa> Pa> What if you remove the bed from a bedroom, what does that bedroom Pa> become? What do you call that room, once the bed is gone? Pa> Pa> And what about people who dont use beds? Like those who sleep on a Pa> futon, or couch? These people dont have beds, so they cant have bedrooms Pa> in their home! Pa> Pa> ---- Pa> Pa> Then too, why are the rooms that contain toilets in them, called Pa> Bathrooms in homes and Restrooms in public buildings? Pa> And, what about bathrooms that dont contain a bathtub or shower? By the Pa> way, does anyone really Rest in a Restroom? Most people just take a shit Pa> or piss and move on..... And "taking a shit" is really false wording. No Pa> one TAKES a shit..... They LEAVE a shit!!! Pa>
This is way too deep for me right now
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snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo says...

Around here (NC) a room is counted as a bed room if it has a closet in it. I think there has to be a door and window for exit incase of fire to be called a bedroom also. Atleast two ways out of the room.
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On Wed, 31 Aug 2016 10:17:38 -0400, Ralph Mowery

I have to agree that normally, all bedrooms have closets. However, I have been in homes that have closets in other rooms, such as the living room.
I dont think I have ever been in any rooms without a door. (Would be kind of hard to get into the room without a door). Except for closets, and sometimes rooms in basements or attics, all rooms usually have windows. Which I can agree should be a fire code....
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On Wednesday, August 31, 2016 at 11:03:00 AM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo wrote:

You do not need a door to get into a room. In fact, it is the door that might actually *prevent* entry. To get into a room, you merely need an opening in a wall, floor or ceiling.

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snipped-for-privacy@eznet.net says...

Maybe a bad choice of words on my part. Would you call it a doorway or what ? Several rooms in my house does not actually have doors, but there are walkways or whatever you want to call them so one can just walk into the rooms.
Anyway, it may or may not be some fire code that bedrooms need 2 ways out.
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On Wednesday, August 31, 2016 at 1:44:22 PM UTC-4, Ralph Mowery wrote:

The general term is "opening".
It could be a rough opening, a cased opening (a doorway with trim), a finished opening (no trim), a sash opening (window opening), a masonry opening, etc.
Some openings are called "portals" but that term is usually only used for very fancy openings. An archway is an opening with an arched top, but some people use the term archway even when the top is flat.
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On Wednesday, August 31, 2016 at 2:28:39 PM UTC-4, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Correction:
re: "a cased opening (a doorway with trim)"
I should have said "an opening with trim".
A "doorway with trim" *is* a cased opening, but a cased opening might not be a doorway.
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On Wed, 31 Aug 2016 13:44:16 -0400, Ralph Mowery

It is actually in article 1029 of the ICC building code. This is called "Emergency escape and rescue" and refers to basements and sleeping areas. It defines the required size and exterior access to the openings required. (short answer 5 sq/ft with floor at grade and 5.7 sq/ft with floor above or below grade).
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On Wed, 31 Aug 2016 13:44:16 -0400, Ralph Mowery

You're right, you dont need a door, just a doorway. Some trailer houses dont have interior doors except the bathroom. Some people just hang some sort of curtain or similar thing. Personally, if I lived in one of them, I'd put on real doors, but that's just my preference.
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On Wed, 31 Aug 2016 10:17:38 -0400, Ralph Mowery

The closet requirement is something the real estate people came up with. The building code just says "sleeping area" or words to that effect. If the words "bed room" shows up on the plan it does trigger the sleeping area requirements tho and they usually do that so the real estate listing matches the tax records (from the plan). If you put a bed in your "den" after the final inspections, it is between you and your insurance company if this is not a room you rent out (hotel, motel B&B etc)
A "bathroom" is defined. It is "An area including a basin with one or more of the following: a toilet, a tub, or a shower".
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On 08/31/2016 10:32 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I don't know how things are there now or how things were in the USA then, but in another country some 50 years ago, master bedrooms usually did not have a built-in closet (only the additional bedrooms did). The master bedroom would be furnished by the occupant with a bedroom set: matching wardrobe, headboard (often with attached "night stands"), and dresser.
Perce
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says...

Years ago in the US many homes were built with out any closets in the bed rooms. The house I grew up in had 2 bed rooms and no closets in them. One closet was in a hall and the other was in the den. Later a third bed room was added (around 1960) with a closet in it.
Not sure when the bedroom closets came in to many of the new homes. Now almost everyone wants the closet,and really 2 in the master bedroom. One and part of another for the woman and part of one for the man. I guess that people have many more clothes now than they had years ago.
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On 8/31/2016 11:02 AM, Ralph Mowery wrote:

I recall colonial Williamsburg where clothes closets were sparse and small. People in those days did not have a lot of clothing and wore all they had.
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I recall that my grandmother's house (which was built in the very early 1900's) had no closets in the bedrooms. There was one closet next to the front entry door. That was all they had for closets. I have been in other homes built around that same time period and all were much like that. Some had no closets at all.
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wrote:

Property taxes are based on the outside envelope of your house. You have no obligation to let anyone come inside to look around. The exceptions are a warrant or a building permit and that only allows inspection within the scope of the permit.
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On Thursday, September 1, 2016 at 7:46:12 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Please read the last 2 posts in the following thread and tell me what you think:
http://www.bulbs.com/learning/roughservice.aspx
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On Thu, 01 Sep 2016 19:45:42 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

They can easily determine what is inside your home using thermal imaging. Just fly a drone over your house and take an "xray" of it. All walls will be seen, as well as other objects inside.....
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I think in many areas in those days, there were no closets.
But people who today would want a closet used wardrobes (furniture) or armoire, although I think the latter are really for muskets and rifles. Nope, I'm totally wrong about it being related to armour or armormy.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wardrobe
When I lived in Brooklyn and rented my living room as a bedroom, I had two there, that I had found on the street. Now I have 4 of them in my basement, none of them expensive, one for camping equipment, one for miscellaneous, and I can't remember what is in the other two!!! Not only that, there's a ladder, scrap wood and a box of scrap metal in front of them so it's not that easy to open the doors. The box has gotten wet during one of my floods so I don't like to move it. It's had 5 years to dry out, but I'm not sure if that made it strong again. I know I didn't buy the warddrobes, and I doubt I found them on the street in Baltimore, where I live and spend most of my time in a newer n'hood, so I must have brought them from Brooklyn too, but where did I keep them before I moved, and how did I find two of them just before moving? I used to be able to remember everything I'd ever said, every place I'd ever been, and everything I'd ever done, and now I can't even remember this. I must have gotten them in Baltimore, but I don't remember doing that. My first 5 years here I drove a full-size convertible, so if I saw one, I could just put it on the rear seat and trunk and take it home. I should be able to remember where I found them. One has sliding doors, the other 3 hinged doors. The floor of each is about an inch off the floor so they don't get wet in a "flood".
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Ralph Mowery posted for all of us...

Hey Ralph, how about removing the Avast ad?
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