Doerr 1/2 HP electric motor. Replacement Cost?


My septic aererator motor went out. I can tell its getting juice because I can hear it trying to move, but it seems to be frozen.
I am considering buying a new one and fixing (getting it fixed) the broken one later for use as a replacement.
I'm wondering what a replacement might cost.
Here is the info on the plate;
Doerr LR-2213Z D271X 1/2 HP Hz 60 Fr J56Z Duty: Cont. Rise: 40 degrees C Type K Ser. Fac. 1.25 Model PR 69827DE743 Code: L Insul Class: A
V. 115 V. 230 A. 8.4 A. 4.2 Line Line
R Comp: A
Anyone have any idea?
This motor injects air into the Cavatett System for treatment of home sewage. Its gone out before, last time about 10 years ago.
Thanks
Brian
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 18 Sep 2009 13:56:52 -0700 (PDT), usethisone2007

Dag-Nabbit! I don't have a clue about cost.
-- The thing is, when I don't know what the problem is, I do a lot of experimentation...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
usethisone2007 wrote:

Are you sure that is the model? There is a Doerr LR22132 new on eBay for $95.00
MikeB
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yep that's what I was gonna ask too. If that Z is really a 2, there are lots of hits on google for Doerr LR22132 However it appears to be a 3/4hp motor.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

True! Probably not the same motor. Emerson bought Doerr a few years ago.
What is important is the "Fr J56Z" That is the frame, any motor with that frame will physically bolt in as a replacement, just match the volts & RPM.
It has been my experience that if the problem is not a start or run cap, then it is usually cheaper to just replace the smaller motors.
MikeB
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

The Emerson site is a place to look for motors. At least recent years ago for me...replacing a pool pump motor.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri 18 Sep 2009 01:56:52p, usethisone2007 told us...

I'm sorry, I can't answer your question, but it raised a different question in my mind. We have a small 3 year old home with a new 900 gallon septic system. There are only two residents in the home. The system has no pump, nor do any of our neighbors' systems, AFAIK. At what point does one need such a pump in a system? Is it based on size, type of soil, or other factors? If it makes any difference, we live in the AZ desert with typical desert soil and no freezing temperatures.
TIA
--
Wayne Boatwright
************************************************************************
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

There are two different approaches to residential septic systems. The simplest and more common system by far, which you have, relies on bacteria that don't need oxygen. The OP has one that relies on bacteria that need oxygen to work and break down the sewage, hence the need for the aerator.
I'm not sure what the relative tradeoffs are, but I think one is that with the latter system, the effluent is cleaner, the leach field can be smaller, etc. So, for some applications it can be a good fit.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

To Mr. Boatwright:
Your system should be fine unless Arizona goes under water. The non- aerating (sp?) systems are most common. The only caveat is to never flush anything that will not decompose. Examples are paper with lots of clay, such as magazines and some high-end paper, and metals, and sand and dirt and things that you would not put into a compost pile. Toilet paper that says it is safe for septic systems is preferred. If you are reasonably careful, you should have the holding tanks pumped out every 4-5 years to make sure nothing gets out into the drain field that could clog the field tiles/plastic pipes.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.