Do you think splicing 100' of wire onto a GTO exit wand would work?

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On Wed, 03 Feb 2010 01:50:11 -0500, mm wrote:

This is a wonderful find. 12 bucks + tax/shipping for a roll.
Thanks for this great idea. I don't have the wire yet, but the plan is to solder them and then tape them with this scotch 23 self-sealing tape.
Should work.
NOTE: Removed sci.electronics.repair due to a prior request.
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<Snip>
Why not just replace the whole wire from the control box to the sensor wand? Then theres no splices in the ground.
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wrote:

Considering the wand is burried, the only way that will happen is if you raise the splice above ground!
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On Wed, 03 Feb 2010 18:55:44 -0500, PeterD wrote:

Right. The only place the wand and wires comes up for air is directly at the control box attached to the gate.
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On Thu, 4 Feb 2010 02:16:19 +0900, Michael Kennedy wrote:

The sensor wand is sealed.
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On Feb 2, 10:10pm, Elmo <dcdraftwo...@Use-Author-Supplied- Address.invalid> wrote:

Elmo, believe me.
DON'T SOLDER YOUR UNDERGROUND CONNECTIONS. THEY WILL FAIL
see my other post
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On Feb 2, 10:10pm, Elmo <dcdraftwo...@Use-Author-Supplied- Address.invalid> wrote:

The overhead power lines provide a voltage disturbance [shorted out by shielding] and a magnetic disturbance, as a result of how much current is carried [most utilities companies provide free EMF surveys] but if those lines are low voltage, they are close together, so the magentic fields won't be as strong as from those 115kV lines, which are separated by more than 15 feet. If you measure more than 1 microtesla at your cable, I would be surprised. And, you can calculate the effect of such a field. Don't worry about it.
But as you know, make the shield a complete 'opaque' wrap, completely enclosing all wires. Do NOT break the shield and use a single wire to 'jump the gap' for any distance.
From reading the manuals, it appears GTO has active circuitry inside the wand. Power is supplied to it. Plus, from your comments with them, it appears the ONLY difference in the wand/cable is length of wire. Note they know the problems of splicing cable underground and provide you with a 'trouble-free' long run of sealed wire. A splice violates that seal, and believe me an underground splice can be challenging.
You have to retrieve your wand anyway, so I recommend trying the extra cable length. The cost of cable is small. And for this initial test, you can simply use any shielded cable containing more than two twisted pairs. Simply lay the cables out on the ground and test the system. Probably will work. If so, then as you reinstall underground, use a better cable and make sure your splice is placed inside a water-free zone, like in an upside down plastic tub covering the splice. Just picture how would you house such a splice if the whole system is underwater? That pretty much covers what rain soaking will do to you. Even so, still use amalgamizing coatings to seal the conductors, else they will deteriorate.
Sadly, William has the BEST suggestion, but it is much less challenging. Go to the vendor and ask them to upgrade you to a longer cable wand for a small charge. Or, if you feel wronged, no charge.
My bet says the buried part of the system will perform well for ten years spliced and for 25+ years with no splice.
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The wire sounds like two pair direct burial phone line. We use it on irrigation systems. Have you tried the local telephone company?
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Dean Hoffman wrote:

Direct burial telephone wire is solid, not stranded. It is usually thinner, like 22 gauge as well.
--
Greed is the root of all eBay.

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On Tue, 02 Feb 2010 22:16:34 -0500, Michael A. Terrell wrote:

I wonder if it matters. What is the fundamental difference between how a solid wire acts versus multi-stranded wire in this type of low voltage (8-32v) and very low current (1.5ma) application?
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On Tue, 02 Feb 2010 18:01:38 -0600, Dean Hoffman wrote:

Interesting. I don't know if the local phone company sells to people, but I can ask.
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On Wed, 3 Feb 2010 06:10:23 +0000 (UTC), Elmo

They sold to our organization once. Those half-round plastic tubes (half-tubes) 8 feet long that they use. But we had a more comprehensive arrangement with them before hand. And we had to buy a box at a time, maybe 100 per box.
Four conductor shielded wire shoudlnt' be easy to get.
In addition, what I said in another post, if you have a half inch with no shielding, I doubt it matters. Or you can take 2 or 3 inches from your 100 foot piece, and remove the shielding from that and wrap it around the splice area. Soldering it at both ends would be optimal. But it's not like there will be big metal things running over the splice area inducing the gate to open. Even bicycles are less likely to ride on the lawn than on the driveway.
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wrote:

Typo. I meant it shouldnt' be hard to get. But maybe only mail-order (internet).
And of course no one on any newsgroup is obliged to solve a poster's problems. People try because they want to be helpful and sometimes to show off their knowledge (or what they think is knowledge at the time of posting.)
And I too considered returning the original cable. I asked if it had already been buried and was too dirty to return.
And this question was definitely suitable for sci.eletronics.repair, because the only real question is at the electronics level. The question of how to connect two cables is just an inquiry about technique.
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I was told that if you contact customer service, they will make some sort of accomodation to help you.
Give 'em a call.
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This has gone on long enough.
As is true of most companies, the company selling this product is unable to give factual, useful information to the customer. (What else is new?) There is no reason why the people in this group -- or any other group -- should be obliged to make up for its failure to do so.
It seems to me that the manufacturer should have supplied information about selecting the appropriate length of cable, according to the vehicle, the vehicle owner's needs, etc. It apparently did not. If the customer makes a mistake, then the company should DO SOMETHING ABOUT IT, as I've suggested.
If the company won't, then the owner has no recourse but to purchase a new cable or sensor-wand system.
I don't see why this group should be expected to analyze an unfamiliar product and provide useful troubeshooting/modification/repair information, when the manufacturer won't. This problem cannot be new to the company. It ought to have some mechanism in place for resovling such issues. Apparently, it is too stupid to.
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On Wed, 3 Feb 2010 05:43:33 -0800, "William Sommerwerck"

I don't see the company at fault in the initial purchase. Also, only slightly at fault for conflicting advice from the telephone operator on splicing (which differed from the technician's advice, which is what I'd consider the be the accurate one...)
If you think that companies should cover all their customer's errors and mistakes then I'd suggest you start a company and make that a feature of your operation. Maybe you'll have great success. But my experience, as a business man, has been that some people make errors, and it makes little sense to expect someone else to pay for their errors.
As to not seeing 'why this group should...' realize that is the reason this group exists! After all, it is not called 'alt.home.repair.get.maker.to.replace.it' or 'sci.electroncs.leverage.the.company'. We concentrated on repairing the problem. Not trying to figure a way or justification to make the supplier (who did nothing wrong) to replace a product that was not defective or flawed.
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I don't. But I think it should make an effort.
See the posting "GTO wand problem resolved (???)". I might have solved the problem.
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wrote:

No no no....this is the most entertaining thread I have read today. I love the earnestness of the OP.
Mike
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IMPORTANT INFORMATION
I just spoke with a customer-service rep at GTO.
He said that they care about their customers and want them to be happy. You should return the wand to GTO to confirm that it's working correctly. If you need a longer cable, they will make some accommodation (he didn't say what, and I didn't press him) so that you can have the longer cable.
Sometimes it's just a matter of knowing how to present your problem.
I hope this resolves it.
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On Tue, 02 Feb 2010 08:39:31 -0500, PeterD wrote:

Great idea! If it works for the telephone company, it should work here.
On the 3M web site, I found a splice kit for 3-conductor "armored" cable, but not 4 conductor (and it was for 10-14 AWG, not 16AWG).
Here's the product information from: http://tinyurl.com/ybrgmlf http://solutions.3m.com/wps/portal/3M/en_US/3MElectrical/Home/ProductsServices/Products/?PC_7_RJH9U5230GE3E02LECIE20OES1_nid=PVQLFM5BXCbeGCC8VFQJBCgl
- 3M™ 3/C Low Voltage Splice Kit 5730, 14-10 AWG (UPC 00054007431718). - These kits are applicable for indoor and outdoor installations, - including direct burial, aerial and submersible applications. - This kit requires 1 roll of 3M™ Armorcast™ Structural Material.
Do you think I can find a 4-conductor shielded 16 AWG cable splice kit at ACE, OSH, or Home Depot? (I'll try later today.)
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