Do you need a GFCI outlet?

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Years ago, I found GFCI breakers much more expensive than sockets. And there is some way to wire it, so that sockets "downstream" are also protected.
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On Apr 22, 10:54 am, The Daring Dufas <the-daring-

If it were only a few circuits only a few GFCI *outlets* would be needed, too. A GFCI outlet can protect all outlets downstream of it.
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Correct. That is how I did my basement. Feed goes to a GFCI outlet with 5 other protected outlets on the load side and one non-protected dedicated outlet on the line side.
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Limp Arbor wrote:

If you use one GFI receptacle for that, make sure it's not a cheap one.
TDD
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keith wrote:

If I believe there is a chance of a GFI outlet corroding, I'll go with the breaker. Replacing a standard receptacle that has corroded is much cheaper. I was working for an electrical supply house in the early 1970's when GFI breakers first became widely available and this was during the CB radio craze. GFI breakers were mysteriously tripping for no apparent reason. It turned out to be RF from CB radios, especially those with illegal linear amplifiers attached. A lot of PA systems in places like churches were blasting out "BREAKER ONE NINE!", automobiles with early electronic fuel injection systems were stopping in their tracks when illegally boosted CB radios transmitted near them. I had so much fun back in those days.
TDD
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On Thu, 22 Apr 2010 06:16:04 -0700 (PDT), Limp Arbor

I wouldn't even consider placing an order without knowing *exactly* what the total charge was. Particularly since most companies seem to overcharge on shipping to make up for an artificially low item-price.
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Why don't you use the cheaper 15A outlets? I seriously doubt you need many 20A GFCI's.
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Just to make it clear, all GFCIs are rated at 20A, though some have contacts that are rated at 15A. IOW, they're just like a 15A outlet. They work fine in a 20A circuit (i.e. they will "pass thru" 20A).
BTW, the $.59 stuff should be avoided like the plague.
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On Fri, 23 Apr 2010 08:34:29 -0700 (PDT), mike

They are the same price at Home Depot. A 20a GFCI and a 15a GFCI were both around $12 last week when I bought a couple of them.
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