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wrote:

it is a tax that just gets passed through, except for places that "bury" the tax in the cost and charge markup on the tax too.....
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On Tue, 23 Jun 2015 04:42:54 -0500, Vic Smith

I learned you, a customer, can't do that when I was in my 20's. And I figured out why the same day.
If you bring your own parts, and maybe you get to because it's an antique car and you're the only one who has the parts. (You've been hunting for them for years), then he has to charge more for labor. )

Sounds right to me.
And except for fixing tv's as a hobby, i've never been in business. But I understand their pov.

I thought everyone charged 100% markup and still did. No?

I would have taken that advice to mean that he liked you, his cousin. Not that he disliked the practice. Is it too late to ask him?

Indeed, you save an awful lot of money doing your own repairs, and some take no more time than taking the car to the shop, or waiting for the repairman to come to your house. Even if you lose time from your paid job, if you lose 50 from work but don't pay 50 to someone else, you save the money you would have spent on income tax on the money, had you earned it. Plus the satisfaction, plus it takes much less time the second time you do it (although there's a good chance I'll screw up the third time I do something.)
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On 6/23/2015 5:42 AM, Vic Smith wrote:

I used to do my own work. Just had brakes done and I saw what I was charged for the pads. I know I could have gotten them cheaper, but I don't get down on the ground so easy any more so I paid to have them put in.
I also understand the shop had to either stock them or go get them etc. He has to get a markup, he has to make a profit. What is the difference if I pay $50 for pads and $50 for labor or if I pay $25 for pads and $75 for labor? End of the day, the shop has to bring in a certain amount of money to exist.
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That's right. These guys are not getting rich, or Clare would still be doing that. The mechanics make a good middle income living, I hope, and the owner makes an upper middle income income, but he has lots of money invested in the franchise and/or the building, the land, the inventory, the tools that the mechanics don't bring, the commitment to pay salaries, etc.
I don't feel that way about dealers, however.
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micky wrote:

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wrote:

Many make more money with their pen than with their tools.
In my years as a mechanic , mechanics went from being the lowest paid trade to being the lowest paid profession.
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wrote:

franchise fee, and then are REQUIRED to spend on facility upgrades on a regular basis to keep the franchise - and if they loose the franchise for not doing what the manufacturer requires, they do NOT get their franchise fee back - it is GONE. They are required to buy all the "special service tools" and to provide "factory training" for their technicians over and above what the independents need to do.
I spent half of my life as a mechanic as a dealer service manager. Sure, there are bad dealerships out there - but in my experience, the big name chain shops - whether muffler, shock, transmission, or tire related, have a much higher proportion of "crooks", and while there are many good "independents" (and I worked for a few) there are lots of inept grease monkeys willing to rob you blind, either purposely or through their ineptitude, too.
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On 6/23/2015 10:53 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Sounds accurate from my experience. If you find a good shop, stick with them. They may not be the cheapest on every job, but they will save you a bundle if they are honest, knowledgeable and fair.
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When I was working many hours I found a good mechanic only because my wife's car stopped in front of his shop on a busy street. First time I had a car in a shop in 27 years. Frankly, it was scary. They pushed her right into the shop. Lucky place for her fuel pump to fail. Used him until my son became a mechanic. He wasn't cheap and wasn't expensive, and did every job one time only. Never had to take a car back for something he did wrong. There's good ones out there. You just have to find them.
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A good shop may cost a bit more for the repairs you need, but will save you a lot more on the repairs you do not need, because problems were found and nipped in the bud. A properly maintained vehicle requires a lot less in repairs - the maintenance more than pays for itself in the long run.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca posted for all of us...

+1
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Tekkie *Please post a follow-up*

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$29.00 or as much as $180.00. (wholesale from about $26 to $135.00)
Definitely not the same pads!!!!
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My cousin (by marriage) was just screwing people on parts. That was the gist of what the mechanic told me. He wasn't adjusting the labor charges. It was simply added profit. Most independents don't stock many parts. Parts stores deliver them as needed. Where I live there's parts stores all over the place.
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On Wed, 24 Jun 2015 07:21:54 -0500, Vic Smith

provided parts to the trade only - and 2 or 3 auto parts stores, plus Canadian Tire, who would sell anything to anyone - but at "retail".
Now there are about 12 or 15 that will sell to anyone - and to almost anyone at way below list. Even the jobbers sell more crap than high quality parts, just to make a price point.
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On Tue, 23 Jun 2015 04:42:54 -0500, Vic Smith

but also remember the old saying about price and quality.
"If you want first quality oats, be ready to pay first quality price. If you are willing to settle for oats that have already gone through the horse, they do come a bit cheaper".
There are parts, and then there are parts - and there can be a LOT more difference than just the price!!!!
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On Tue, 23 Jun 2015 22:03:16 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

This was the late sixties. So he would charge you 20 bucks for a 10 buck wire set. It was simple gouging.

Back then it was all AC Delco, FoMoCo and Mopar. All OEM. You didn't have the choices you have now. Different world.
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On Wed, 24 Jun 2015 07:22:08 -0500, Vic Smith

Mabee. Mabee the wire set he'd sell you was a set that he paid 15 or 18 dollars for at trade - not the cheapassed set you could buy for $10.
I know the service station where I served my apprenticeship was part of a "buying group" that handled products the average guy could not buy. Quality stuff like Silver Beauty magnetic suppression wire ignition cables. That was back in 1969. The technology has now trickled down and is even used as OEM now - but back then it was really something. You could take a 3 foot cable and stretch it to 5 feet and the resistance didn't change. I could hose down a dodge flathead, a slant six, or a Vauxhaul Viva with the carwash and it wouldn't miss a beat. Sure couldn't do that with the cheap set from the local auto parts store. The volume of parts we went through gave us good buying power - translate that to good discounts - which allowed us to make pretty good profit on parts without gouging.

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Vic Smith posted for all of us...

What is your definition of gouging?
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On Tue, 23 Jun 2015 04:42:54 -0500, Vic Smith

Modern "well run", i.e. highly profitable, shops push parts. There is far more profit selling lots of parts rather then selling labor. If they can sell you an "assembly", like a complete lower control are with ball joints and bushings already in it rather then just putting bushings and ball joints in your old arm, that's what they want to do. Even if the total bill is the same they make far more profit on THAT job plus they can move more jobs thru the shop for the same labor hours. The real money to be made is parts markup.
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Now I understand why the local Chrysler dealership charges $15 for each spark plug.
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