Do you have better ideas for outdoor work gloves?

Do you have an idea for a more durable leather work glove that protects the entire hand and wrist than what I've come up with over the past year or two?
The best I can find are these three types of gloves:

1. For working outside, the best I can find are the TIG welder's gloves. They protect well, but they don't last long - so the goal is something more durable that doesn't cost much more (they're about $18 or so per pair).
2. For most chemical jobs, I use the Costco nitrile gloves by the boxfull (since they're single-use only).
3. For the easy jobs in between those two, I use the Costco set of rubberized cloth gloves (but they are also single use only as they're destroyed within minutes in most cases).
The nitrile and rubber-coated gloves work fine for the easy jobs - but the tough outside jobs are wearing holes in my skin because the leather gloves are torn within a few weekends.
I've learned NOT to buy any glove with a seam across the palm; nor any with thin leather at any location (and to get extra thickness of leather in the palms) - but even then they're worn out too soon.
If you have better ideas for more durable outdoor work glove that also protects well, that would be very useful advice indeed!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/29/2013 12:28 PM, Danny D. wrote:

Basically the type gloves I use. I'd probably have duct tape over the holes in the leather gloves until the gloves were useless.
Other gloves I like are bicyclists gloves with no fingers and padded palms when mowing the lawn. Keeps mower vibrations from running up your arms and feels more comfortable.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 29 Apr 2013 12:54:36 -0400 Frank wrote:

That's a good idea!
I have a hilly semi-wild lawn that has very tall grasses tucked away in all the myriad corners and edges which I mow infrequently:

My palms hurt for days after mowing ... so the padded bike gloves idea may be a wonderful addition to my work glove drawer.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Danny D." wrote in message
On Mon, 29 Apr 2013 12:54:36 -0400 Frank wrote:

That's a good idea!
I have a hilly semi-wild lawn that has very tall grasses tucked away in all the myriad corners and edges which I mow infrequently:

My palms hurt for days after mowing ... so the padded bike gloves idea may be a wonderful addition to my work glove drawer
One more thought. Try a thin coat of "shoe goo" (spelling?) That is tough stuff. Just coat the hardest wear areas. WW
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Danny D." wrote in message
Do you have an idea for a more durable leather work glove that protects the entire hand and wrist than what I've come up with over the past year or two?
The best I can find are these three types of gloves:

1. For working outside, the best I can find are the TIG welder's gloves. They protect well, but they don't last long - so the goal is something more durable that doesn't cost much more (they're about $18 or so per pair).
2. For most chemical jobs, I use the Costco nitrile gloves by the boxfull (since they're single-use only).
3. For the easy jobs in between those two, I use the Costco set of rubberized cloth gloves (but they are also single use only as they're destroyed within minutes in most cases).
The nitrile and rubber-coated gloves work fine for the easy jobs - but the tough outside jobs are wearing holes in my skin because the leather gloves are torn within a few weekends.
I've learned NOT to buy any glove with a seam across the palm; nor any with thin leather at any location (and to get extra thickness of leather in the palms) - but even then they're worn out too soon.
If you have better ideas for more durable outdoor work glove that also protects well, that would be very useful advice indeed!
Check and see what the rodeo riders use. They must be durable to withstand the ropes. WW
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 29 Apr 2013 11:04:10 -0600 WW wrote:

Interesting idea of Bull Rider Gloves, as it looks like they thought about not having any stitching in the palm (the palm stitches always come undone after a few hours simply because the stitches were through so I'm always gluing the palms back together).
This looks like a nice one, but it's $75 a glove: http://ranchco.net/servlet/the-5376/Tiffany-Rodeo-Leather-Bull/Detail
Here is also a nice one, but it's $50 a glove: http://rodeohard.com/Tiffany-Bull-Riding-Glove-_p_1788.html
It gets more reasonable with deer skin gloves at $40 a glove: http://petestown.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath 8&products_idd3&zenid=m718djdda0c5332ld871gutj70
This looks as good, but it's still high at $35 a glove: http://usrodeosupply.com/Gloves/bullriding-gloves
This gets us down a bit lower to $29 a glove: http://teskeys.com/discipline/bronc-or-bull-riding/gloves.html
Googling further, I can find them for $18 a glove: http://hayneedle.com/product/tough1menslefthandrodeoglovecowhide.cfm? source=pla&tid=JTIN1124-2&adtype=pla&kw=&ci_src588969&ci_sku=JTIN1124-2&gclid=CJX6mpa68LYCFYRfpQodyXQA3A
So now what I need to do, since size and fit are important, is to find a local resource in San Jose for rodeo or roper gloves.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 29 Apr 2013 18:11:55 +0000 Danny D. wrote:

Ooops. The stitches 'wear' through ...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 29 Apr 2013 16:28:26 +0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

Work gloves never last long, except for the heavy suede. You lose a lot of feel with them Better to develop some callouses, and wear gloves only for protection where burning, cutting, cold, chemicals, etc, might damage your skin. That's been my experience. If you do like them for common work, just buy some cheap cotton work gloves that you've found to be comfortable and last some. Then stock up when you find the cost suitable.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/29/2013 11:28 AM, Danny D. wrote: ...

What kind of work are you doing that qualifies as the tough jobs?
For general farm work (other than "bob wahr" fences and the like) I just use single thickness cowhide gloves and wear them until generally there is very little left--the protection is good enough w/ pretty hardened hands a few holes don't really bother that much. They're $6-8/pair at local farm supply.
For fencing and other really hard work generally just use heavier of the same, often w/ the rough exterior. Again, they're still serviceable long after a few holes even w/ barbed wire and the like. They're $8-10 a pair.
Never could see point in 2X-3X the asking price--as your post says, never found any that lasted enough longer to make the cost differential worthwhile.
The first failure I generally see in the smooth leather is the stitching along the forefingers...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 29 Apr 2013 12:30:41 -0500 dpb wrote:

I just slapped together a collage to show where work gloves fail:

These fail in what I would consider normal home maintenance, which includes felling trees, clearing (very) spiny brush, pulling thorny weeds, digging & filling holes, cutting & pulling nasty poison oak infestations, removing Scotch & Spanish broom weed bushes, etc.
Looking to see *where* they fail, it seems, as you noted, the right index finger stitching often fails, as does the right thumb stitching. By far, that's the main failure mode of these work gloves.
In some cases, the right index finger and the ring finger wore through the leather, but most of the damage, as you noted, was at the seams of the index finger & thumb.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/29/2013 1:58 PM, Danny D. wrote:

For that kind of thing I'd just continue as I do--use 'em up and go on. It doesn't seem to me worth the cost for anything as expensive as you're buying already and I expect half-the-cost will last nearly as long.
And, even if the finger is split along the seam they've got much useful life; cosmetics are of little matter.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 29 Apr 2013 16:28:26 +0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

been known to take them off and leave them "who knows where"
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Oh... was that you? . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
I buy the cheap kind. When they get dirty, I throw them away. I have been known to take them off and leave them "who knows where"
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

<...snipped...> These may not suit every project you have in mind, but I consider them a very good value:
http://www.harborfreight.com/mechanics-gloves-large-93640.html
They are often available with a coupon or on sale for $3 - $4 a pair.
--
Better to be stuck up in a tree than tied to one.

Larry W. - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar.org
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.