Do they make Outdoor GFI outlets

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On Mon, 24 Dec 2012 08:26:19 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"

Come on now...... Metal boxes have been used for electrical stuff for ages as well as metal cover plates on sheds, garages, industrial, etc. That's what the ground wires are for, and I'm sure the cover is connected to ground somehow, knowing how the NEC operates. Even switches have ground screws now, and I really dont know what good they do.
Not to mention that many outdoor boxes are still metal, unlike those blue plastic boxes they use indoors for almost all new wiring now.
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On Mon, 24 Dec 2012 07:19:57 -0600, Dean Hoffman

Hey, that looks like the ticket.... Thanks!
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wrote:

There are different plastics used. 10 years is what I've gotten out of my Polycarbonate (Lexan) "bubble covers" They've yellowed a bit, but the strength remains fine. Polycarbonate is what's used for street light refractors too.
Tomsic
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That's not bad at all. But it depends on how extreme your weather is. In my part of the country, the winters are brutal, and last summer proved to test everyone's extremes with heat.
Is that the same plastic used for some car headlights too? That stuff seems to hold up well, but gets foggy, causing the light output to dininish after years.
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hammer and it won't break; but it does yellow due to UV exposure over time. There are UV-stabilized versions that will slow down the process and, for headlight lenses, kits that will renew the surface.
Tomsic
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I don't think car headlight covers get foggy so much as scratched up from debris hitting it at 70 mph...
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On Tue, 25 Dec 2012 09:54:16 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@brainchampagne.com wrote:

Right. That's why he said there are "kits that will renew the surface".
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Thus the passage of time isn't what ruins them, so making an outlet cover out of this isn't a problem.
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On Tue, 25 Dec 2012 14:57:54 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@brainchampagne.com wrote:

Becoming opaque isn't a problem for an outlet cover, is it?
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On Sun, 23 Dec 2012 10:46:51 -0500, "John Grabowski"

Ok. so they do make them... Thanks This is just the common flat cover. It's only used in winter, so the door on the cover is open, but in the warm weather the cover is closed, which is when rain could get in. I suspect that water gets under that door on the cover and gets in around those push buttons on the GFI. That's all I can think.
Maybe for this application, I will buy a GFI breaker, or as I mentioned earlier, just use a portable cord type GFI. Having to keep replacing them is costly and a big pain in the ass during the winter, which is the only time I use this particular outlet.
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For about 10 years, I've had several GFCI-protected outlets in my yard and on the outside of my house. Only one has failed. They're mounted in standard boxes (the ones in the yard are weatherproof boxes on a ground stake). But instead of a cover plate, there's a sturdybox (clear polycarbonate) with a hinged cover to protect the plug and GFCI from snow and rain. All outlets are used fairly often for yard tools, holiday lights, gutter heaters, etc. so I don't see that outdoor use causes failures. And, I agree with the other posters. You have to have the power on to test or reset the GFCI.
Tomsic
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snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote in

Same thing here. Outdoors they don't last long.
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Noahbuddy has brought this to us :

Had an idustrial situation where no matter what we did with silicone etc, it would get water in the box and eventually something would arc over. Left a bolt out of the bottom of the box and had no more trouble because instead of th water steaming into every nook and cranny, it just drained out the bottom.
--
John G



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John G wrote:

Sounds like condensation - it's often a good idea to have a tiny[1] hole in the lowest point of conduit runs or fittings.
[1] Tiny enough so it is not a hazard and also not to allow all and sundry from the bug world in. However, not so advisable if the fitting is likely to be subject to strong jets of water, eg hoses or pressure washers.
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Tim Watts Personal Blog: http://www.dionic.net/tim /

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